Lesson Strategies

Critical & Creative Thinking Skills – Activity: Would I Lie to You?

Would I lie to you?

 

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Introduction
Preparation
Rules
How to Start
Resources
Examples within On the Job website

 

Would I Lie to You? A Comedy Show

 MiddleMiddle High SchoolSecondary

LiteracyAustralian Curriculum General Capability: Literacy

CriticalAustralian Curriculum General Capability: Critical and creative thinking
Personal and social capability
Australian Curriculum General Capability: Personal and social capability

 

 

Introduction

This game is based on the BBC TV Game Panelist Show of the same name - sometimes abbreviated to #WILTY 

The host of the show is Rob Brydon. The show is unscripted and has won numerous Comedy Show Awards.

The team captains are comedians David Mitchell and Lee Mack. For each show, two celebrity guests join each of the team captains. The teams compete as each player reveals unusual facts and embarrassing personal tales for the evaluation of the opposing team. Some of these are true, some are not, and it is the panellists' task to decide which is which.

Rounds
In all rounds, the scoring system is the same: teams gain a point for correctly guessing whether a statement is true or not, but if they guess incorrectly the opposing team gets a point.

Current rounds
  

"Home Truths": Panellists read out a statement about themselves. The opposing team has to decide whether it is true or false by asking the panellist questions. The first series used all six panellists; from the second series onwards, the round tended to focus on the four guests. In series two a 'possessions' element was introduced, in which the panellist takes an item out of a box and reads a statement from a card, and has to convince the opposing team that the possession genuinely belongs to them.

"This is My...": A guest comes onto the set and is introduced by first name, but remains standing in silence as the round continues. Panellists on one team tell the opposing team about their relationship to the guest; only one account out of three told is genuine, and the opposing team has to work out which it is. At the end of the round, the guest reveals their true identity, and which of the panellists they have a genuine relationship with.
  
"Quick-Fire Lies": The second questioning round, with the panellists chosen at random. In earlier series, the panellists were ostensibly under a time limit although no on-screen indicator of the time limit was ever present. The notion of a time limit was eventually dropped in the later series, making the round identical to "Home Truths" in practice. This round usually features – but is not exclusive to – Mitchell and Mack. From the fourth series onwards, Brydon also became an occasional participant, with both teams questioning him at once.


For the purposes of education, the show is replicated with a similar format. The Teacher becomes the Host  and two team captains are chosen along with 4 other team members - two for each side.

The presentation is simple - one main chair in the middle for the Host and 3 chairs on each side for the teams.

 

This is a great exercise in getting students to speak confidently about a topic they know best - themselves. The students can then graduate to other topics once they know the game.

 

TeacherTeacher

You only need to watch one episode to get an idea of the show.

Recommended:

True or Lie: Owls freak me out! Would I Lie to You? - BBC
https://youtu.be/bLNVdrwqrlY
 

 

You can pause the show just before the reveal of a Truth or Lie and ask the class to vote on a Truth or Lie.

Another great episode is the one below but it can't be embedded. View on TubeTube:

Mortimerian Tales - Bob Mortimer on Would I Lie to You? - Part 1
https://youtu.be/1vE8ExuuNZQ

 

Preparation

Print out the following Would I Lie to You card - one for each student on the panel.

 

Rules for students

1. You are to write up 5 statements about yourself - that is either truthful or a lie - on the card given to you. Make sure that there is at least two lies. A true statement has to be entirely true, a false statement can be based on a true story so long as the actual statement is false.

Select only one to read out each time you are selected by the teacher. 

2. Each time the other team is fooled, your team scores a point. /span>

 

How to Start

1. The Teacher is to select one student to read out one of their statements.

2. TThe team members on the other side are to question the student,  who read out their statement, to find out whether the statement is a truth or a lie.

3. Opposing team is to make a decision - truth or lie. 

4. The Teacher asks the student "Is it a truth or a lie?" The student replies. /span>

5. At the end of the game, tally up the scores.

 

Resources

1. Teachers you could use the following to include the whole class - maybe at a camp or as an introductory activity at the start of a year. NB. You will need to carefully look at the suggestions and only use the appropriate ones.

Ice Breakers or Party Games - Would I Lie to You?

 

2. This resource is to show young people about how difficult it is to discern the truth online: text message, email or instant messages.

TES - original resource

Resource - image of Lesson Plan

 

3. ESL Lesson using Would I Lie to You - original source

PDF

 

Examples of "Would I Lie to You?" within On the Job website

#TC means that The Conversation is used as stimulus material.

Entertainer
Sean Choolburra

Life on the Job
Would I Lie to You - A Comedy Show

MiddleMiddle High SchoolSecondary

Lesson Strategy:
Would I Lie to You?
Insurance Claims Investigator

Insurance Claims Investigator
Can you be a fraudster?

PrimaryPrimary MiddleMiddle  High SchoolSecondary

Lesson Strategy:
Would I Lie to You?

 

 

Materials sourced from

Wikipedia
TES

 

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