Spraypainter

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Industrial Spraypainter
Metal Surface Finisher
Vehicle Painter

 

Related Jobs or Working with these Jobs

 

Clerical or OrganisingPractical or MechanicalArtistic or Creative
Skill Level 1Skill Level 2Skill Level 3

 

Industrial Spraypainter
   Manufacturing & Production

Practical or MechanicalSkill Level 1

Industrial spray painters operate spray-painting equipment to apply protective coatings to manufactured items or structures. Future Growth Static

ANZSCO ID: 7112

Specialisations: Powder Coater, Rust Proofer

Alternative names: Powder Coater

Knowledge, skills and attributes  

To become a spray painter, you would need:

  • to enjoy practical and manual activities

  • good hand-eye coordination

  • to be neat and precise

  • normal colour vision

  • no breathing-related problems or no chest complaints

  • no allergies to thinners, solvents, dust or paints

  • a good level of physical fitness - able to cope with the physical demands of the job

 

Industrial Spraypainter at work
Industrial Spraypainter at work
(Source: Sydney Painters)

Duties and Tasks

  • prepare surfaces to be coated by removing dirt, grease and rust by using various methods (abrasive blasting, high pressure water washing or power wire brushing)

  • mix and match paint or chemicals to meet the requirements of the job

  • apply primer and finishing coats using spray guns

  • rub down painted items surfaces between coats as necessary

  • operate paint dipping baths and lifting equipment

  • respray or touch up any defective areas of painted or coated items

  • clean nozzles, containers and hoses of machines

  • monitor extractors, drying fans and heaters

  • mix chemicals to meet the requirements of the customer

  • spray coatings (such as paint, lacquer, enamel, silver or copper solutions) onto manufactured products to provide finished surfaces

  • move items to drying areas and unload and stack them for further painting or packaging

  • clean work areas and spray equipment.

Working conditions

Most spray painters are employed full time. In a full-time job you would work a standard number of hours per week. Industrial spray painters usually work in factories, workshops, vehicle crash repair businesses, or on building sites. You would spend most of your time standing or bending over. You would wear protective clothing, including masks and goggles when handling chemicals and paints.

Industrial spray painters usually work in noisy factory or construction environments. Most of their time is spent standing or bent over.

 

Career Pathways
Career Pathways
(Source: Apprenticeships R US)

Tools and technologies

The following components are utilized in commercial and industrial painting applications.

Applicator A nozzle, gun, or wand utilizes the Venturi effect to coat a surface. The tools are meant to be handheld or used in an automated paint spraying system. These dictate the pattern, droplet size, angle, and intensity of the spray. Some spray systems support multiple applicators.
Power source A powered paint sprayer is supplied by either a gas-powered or electric motor, whose operational strength is rated in horsepower.
Pressure source An air compressor or pump feeds the surface coating through the painting system. This contributes to the flow rate of the paint and pressure is represented in PSI. Turbines are also commonplace.
Media A variety of surface finishing liquids can be applied by a spray system, though latex or oil-based paint is most common. Other agents may require thinning to be used in spray systems.
Reservoir The system's integrated basin for paint awaiting application. These range in size from small cups to paint drums.
Handling equipment Large, heavy-duty paint spraying systems, or systems meant to paint outdoor terrain, often require a truck or cart for transportation or operation.
Application enclosures Since between 20 to 40 percent of the spray can be lost due to overspray and droplet drift, spray booths keep wayward particles within an enclosure. These range in size from cabinets to garage-like environments to accommodate a variety of components.
Ventilation equipment Due to the airborne concentration of minuscule paint droplets, respirators and ventilation equipment are often legally-required components in the spray painting process. Spray booths often incorporate a blower or overhead hood.
Electrode An electrode is immersed in the reservoir, attached to the applicator, or used to create an electrostatic field. This charges the paint, and the component to be sprayed is oppositely charged or grounded. The paint is attracted to the component to greatly increase coating efficiency.
Curing units Convection and infrared ovens are used to expedite the drying process of certain paints and surface coatings.
Spinning bell/disc A spinning bell or disc is used to atomize and electrically charge the paint particles via centrifugal forces. An airstream directs the paint towards the part, which has been charged or grounded.
Part feeder In high volume spray applications it can be beneficial to have a conveyor or part placement system to assist in moving unfinished and finished components between processes.

Industrial Spraypainters at work
(Source: Sydney Painters)

 

Generally speaking, there are four methods utilized to produce droplet-sized particles and impart direction upon the spray agent. This technology in conjunction with the applicator determines if the spray pattern and intensity.

Airless: Paint spraying or application system using high fluid pressure to atomize paint by forcing it through a small orifice. Paint under high pressure is passed through a nozzle and broken down into droplets, or "atomized," where it enters the lower pressure region outside the gun tip. (Less air is used than in conventional air spraying so that the problems of dry spray and paint bounce-back is reduced.)

Airless (air-assisted): Air-assisted airless spray process is used to alter the spray fan shape pattern, but not to atomize the paint.

Air atomized: Paint application system wherein paint is atomized by combination with compressed air. System of applying paint in the form of tiny droplets in air, i.e., paint is broken down into droplets, or "atomized," by a spray gun as a result of being forced into a high velocity air stream. Shape and paint density of the resulting droplet cloud can be controlled by air pressure, paint viscosity, and gun tip geometry.

Rotary cup/disc: Rotary spray guns or applicators use a rapidly spinning cup/bell or flat disc to project powders or atomize paint. Rotary cup or bell rotary applicators produce a fan pattern, which is closer to a nozzle spray gun. A rotating head is shaped to deliver paint forward in a circular pattern. The bell may be directed at any angle and be moved on robots or reciprocators, just as nozzle spray guns are. Disc rotary applicators spin the coating media out radially. Rotating heads that deliver paint horizontally 360° around the head are useful on omega loop conveyor finishing lines. A disk is usually mounted horizontally on a vertical reciprocator. Disc rotary spray guns are also useful for internal or ID coating applications.

In an effort to reduce energy and material consumption, many spray painting operations systems utilize high volume, low pressure (HVLP) or low volume, low pressure (LVLP) systems to spray coat items with large surface areas. These spray techniques are often driven by turbines, not compressors.

 

Did You Know?

Sydney Harbour Bridge gets a fresh coat of paint — again
Daily Telegraph 3 January 2015

SYDNEY Harbour Bridge has an annual $20 million maintenance budget, with its exposed surfaces needing to be repainted every five years, while other parts of the structure last 30 years without a new coat.

IT’S one of Sydney’s great urban myths — when the painters on the Sydney Harbour Bridge get to the end, they go back to the beginning and start all over again.

Wrong.

The reality is that there are sections of the 52,000-tonne structure that have not felt the tickle of a paint brush for up to 30 years.

Justin Buhs
Justin Buhs, a senior painter on the Sydney Harbour Bridge, paints rivets by hand.
Picture: Chris McKeen
(Source: Daily Telegraph)


Matt Fleming
Matt Flemming stands on a metal grill above the harbour as he prepares to spray paint the bridge.
Picture: Chris McKeen
(Source: Daily Telegraph)

Robot
‘Sandy’ the sand blasting robot under internal support beams in the Sydney Harbour Bridge.
Picture: Chris McKeen
(Source: Daily Telegraph)


With close to 500,000sq m of steelwork to be painted and kept free of rust, a crew of 15 workers is needed to help what its builder John Bradfield called the “blue arch of Heaven” looking her best.

The bridge’s owners, Roads and Maritime Services, even use two robots to blast away the old lead paint from internal sections of the Bridge.

Sydney Harbour Bridge works manager, Waruna Kaluarachchi, in charge of the bridge’s annual $20 million maintenance budget, said its exposed surfaces need to be repainted every five years while others last 30 years without a new coat.

“We can’t start at one end of the Bridge and start painting until we get to the other end,” Mr Kaluarachchi said. “It doesn’t work like that.”

It would take about 30,000 litres of the traditional “Sydney Harbour Bridge Grey” paint to do just one coat. The paint is a registered trademark colour and not for sale on the open market.

Support Beams
Support beams under the Sydney Harbour Bridge, on the northern approach.
Picture: Chris McKeen
(Source: Daily Telegraph)


FACTS AND FIGURES OF SYDNEY HARBOUR BRIDGE

Travel Sydney, Australia - Visit The Sydney Harbor Bridge
https://youtu.be/KXZlMuKNCro



Sydney Harbour Bridge - Megastructures: World's Greatest Bridges - Australia Engineering Documentary
https://youtu.be/oxBLGtfwZPc


■ Highest point is 134m above sea level

■ Arch is 503m long

■ Main deck is 49m wide

■ There is 49m clearance underneath for shipping

■ Pylons are 89m high, and its total length (including approaches) is 1149m

■ Road surface is replaced every 10 years

■ Flags on top of the bridge are replaced every four to six months

■ The Bridge took almost nine years to build at a cost of close to £10,000,000 ($300,000,000 in today’s money)

■ 1400 workers involved in building the bridge

■ It is made up of 52,800 tonnes of steel

■ It has 6,000,000 rivets weighing 3200 tonnes

■ There is 95,000m³ of concrete

■ 272,000 litres of paint was used to give the bridge its first three coats

■ The arch can rise or fall as much as 18cm due to heating and cooling


Education and training/entrance requirements

You can work as an industrial spray painter without formal qualifications, but employers usually require Year 10. You will probably get some informal training on the job.

Once you are employed, you may be able to develop, and have recognised, additional skills under the Manufacturing or Metal and Engineering Training Packages that will expand your career opportunities within these industries.

Employment Opportunities

Industrial spray painters work for engineering firms, appliance manufacturers, furniture makers, foundries, motor vehicle manufacturers and sheet metal and railway workshops. They may also work in structural engineering, marine and Defence industries and in the resources processing industry.

Job opportunities depend largely on the level of manufacturing activity.

Did You Know?

Air spraying
. Using atomization, air sprayers apply color through a fine mist or spray. They also gives a smoother finish compared to other methods.

Airless sprayers. These sprayers use higher blowing pressure, so they're more efficient for covering large areas. However, they also require the user to wear personal protective equipment (PPE).


Spray painting equipment refers to the collection of devices used to apply a surface coating to objects by the means of atomized liquids that are propelled through the air, usually by compressed air. It also refers to a series of devices used to optimize the coating application.

A paint, stain, ink, varnish, lacquer, or polyurethane is pressurized and forced into droplets or aerosol by a high-velocity airstream that also serves to distribute the coating on a surface. The spray is patterned onto the workpiece by an applicator, and cleaning and curing equipment helps perfect the paint's adhesion.
(Source: GlobalSpec)

Vehicle Spraypainter
   Manufacturing & Production

Practical or MechanicalClerical or OrganisingArtistic or Creative
Skill Level 1Skill Level 2Skill Level 3

Vehicle Painters prepare surfaces of vehicles, match and mix colours and and apply primer and finishing coats of paint. They may paint new or damaged cars or apply designs or signs. Spray painters prepare surfaces of vehicles, match and mix colours, and apply primer and finishing coats of paint. Powder coaters apply paint and other industrial coatings to vehicles and a range of other manufactured items. They inspect the vehicle or surface they will be painting, clean and prepare it, remove rough spots and sand or treat the surface, apply an undercoat to the surface, and mix and prepare the paint for application. They may use computerised paint mixing technology to do this. They spray-paint or powder coat the vehicle or article, check the quality and depth of their paintwork and polish the finished product. Future Growth Static

ANZSCO ID: 3243

Specialisations: Classic or Vintage Car Painter,

Alternative names: Vehicle Refinisher, Powder Coater, Auto Painter, Automotive Painter,

Knowledge, skills and attributes     

  • enjoy practical and manual activities

  • good hand-eye coordination

  • normal colour vision

  • no breathing-related problems

  • no allergies to thinners or paints

  • able to stand or bend for lengthy periods

At work
(Source: Automotive Training Centres)

Duties and Tasks

  • removing rough spots on vehicle panels

  • sanding surfaces by hand and with power sanders

  • masking areas not to be painted with tape and paper

  • colour matching and mixing paints to match paint shades, and selecting pre-mixed paint - mix and match paint by eye or by using computer technology to ensure correct colour match

  • applying primer and finishing coats using spray-guns, and sanding or rubbing down surfaces between coats

  • touching up paintwork and applying polish to vehicles

  • removing masking papers, and waxing and polishing finished paintwork

  • painting signs and artwork on vehicles

  • treating vehicles with rust-proofing chemicals

Working conditions

Powder coaters either work in automotive body repair shops and panel beaters, or in industrial workshops, factories and paint shops. Conditions may be noisy, and they may be on their feet for extended periods. Some Powder coaters may travel to perform their work on-site. They work regular hours but may be required to work overtime depending on their workload. They are exposed to paint in particle form, which can be highly toxic, and requires that they wear protective gear such protective clothing and face masks.

At work
Manual Dexterity Is Important in Auto Painting Careers
As most of the work is done by hand, good manual dexterity is an important trait in auto painting careers.
A steady grip and good hand-eye coordination will go a long way.
Being in good physical shape is important as well, as auto painting can require long periods of standing, crouching, bending, or kneeling.

(Source:
Apprenticeships R US)

Tools and technologies

Powder coaters use a range of different paints and spray guns, including powder-coat and electrostatic spray guns and metal arc spraying equipment. They also use sanding and grit-blasting machines, cleaning and rinsing materials, pre-treatment tanks and a range of chemicals. They are usually required to wear protective clothing including masks. Some spray painters may be required to drive fork-lifts, cranes and trucks to travel to jobs or reach areas to be painted.

Education and training/entrance requirements

You can work as a Vehicle Painter without formal qualifications if you are able to demonstrate your technical competency to employers. However, a certificate III in Automotive Refinishing Technology or another relevant vehicle painting course is usually required. This course is often completed as part of an apprenticeship.

To become a spray painter you usually have to complete a VET qualification in Automotive Refinishing Technology or Surface Preparation and Coating Application. You may need to be employed as an apprentice or trainee in vehicle or industrial spray painting to undertake these courses. Employers generally require junior secondary school certificate or equivalent.

Vehicle spray painters may need to be certified, have a motor vehicle repair licence, or work under the supervision of a licensed repairer.

You can also undertake a traineeship in surface preparation and coatings application. The traineeship usually takes 36 months to complete.

To work as a powder coater within the motor vehicle industry you usually need to undertake a vehicle painting apprenticeship. The apprenticeship usually takes 42 to 48 months to complete and is available as a school-based apprenticeship.

To work as a powder coater in the motor vehicle industry in Australia, you will need to obtain a Motor Vehicle Repairer's Certificate. An Australian Police Certificate is required to gain a Motor Vehicle Repairer's Certificate.

To work as a vehicle painter in NSW, you must be certified by NSW Fair Trading. To work as a vehicle painter in the ACT, you must have a motor vehicle repair licence, or work under the supervision of a licensed repairer.

Employment Opportunities

Overall employment of spray painters is projected to grow slower than the average for all occupations.

A number of international companies in the vehicle manufacturing industry are in the process of closing their Australian operations. However, as with many skilled manufacturing jobs, employers often report difficulty finding qualified workers. Therefore, job opportunities should be good for those with industrial spray painting experience.

Vehicle painters work for crash repair firms and motor vehicle manufacturers. Some are self-employed, usually in partnership with panel beaters. Experienced vehicle painters may become representatives for paint manufacturers or assessors with insurance companies.

 

 

Did You Know?


Detail for Colour

To be a great automotive painter, you need to have a great eye for colour. If you can tell the difference between subtle differences in tint, then automotive painting might be for you. Car companies have put out vehicles in tens of thousands of colours over the years, and even cars painted the same colour on the factory floor might look different after a decade or more of varying conditions, so painters need to have a keen eye to be able to accurately identify and replicate every colour they see. Blending and matching is a big part of the job, and this is where a lot of the creativity and artistry comes in, particularly for custom or specialized paint jobs.
(Source: Automotive Training Centres)

 

Metal Surface Finisher
  Manufacturing & Production

Practical or MechanicalSkill Level 1

Metal surface finishers work in metal fabrication and engineering production operations. Electroplaters control plating processes and maintain solutions used to coat metal articles and other parts with non-ferrous metals. They finish metal products by cleaning, polishing, filing or bathing them in acid solutions. They also apply protective and decorative coatings. Future Growth Static

Electroplaters (metal platers) coat metal plates and objects, such as car bodies, with a protective layer of metal to prevent rust or create a decorative finish. They start by cleaning the item to be plated and covering areas not to be plated with resistant wax or tape. Then they dip the item into or brush it with a plating solution, pass electric currents through the plating solution to oxidise the item, and finally remove and dry the freshly-plated item.

ANZSCO ID: 322112
  
Alternative names: Chrome Plater, Electroplater, Powder Coater
   
Specialisations: Anodiser, Electroformer, Galvaniser

Electroplater - coats metal parts and articles with a layer of decorative or protective metal such as copper, silver, nickel or chromium. They work for electroplating firms, anodisers, metal polishers and printed circuit board manufacturers. Electroplaters may specialise in one of the electroplating operations, such as anodising, barrel plating, metal preparation or powder coating.

Knowledge, skills and attributes

  • enjoy practical and manual activities

  • enjoy technical activities

  • able to cope with the physical demands of the job

  • able to work independently and as part of a team

  • patient

  • able to work accurately

  • good with numbers

  • safety-conscious

  • free from allergies to paint, solvents or dusts

 

Electroplating
(Source: Cityplating)

 


Duties and Tasks

Metal surface finishers may perform the following tasks:

  • coat metal articles and parts with a layer of decorative or protective metal such as copper, silver, nickel or chromium

  • prepare and maintain plating solutions

  • clean and prepare metal surfaces with cleaning solutions, such as acids or alkalis, or by using blasting cabinets

  • apply waxes, lacquers or resistant adhesive tapes to areas not to be plated

  • dip parts in plating solutions or use selective brush plating

  • use electroplating equipment, setting and adjusting controls to achieve the desired thickness of plating

  • selects metal stock for job requirements

  • heats metal in forges and furnaces and hammers, punches and cuts metal using hand tools and machine presses

  • tempers and hardens finished articles by quenching in oil or water baths or by cooling gradually in air

  • prepares electrolytic and silver solutions for electroforming and planting solution to the objects to be coated

  • sets and adjusts controls to regulate electric current and depositing of coating on objects.


Working conditions

Metal surface finishers work in production areas that can be noisy, hot, dusty and may contain fumes. However, the work environment is generally spacious, well ventilated and well lit. They may have to spend long periods standing and are sometimes required to work shifts. Electroplaters work in large metal or electronic manufacturing plants and small parts workshops. They work with chemicals and electricity, and are exposed to toxic fumes, all of which can be dangerous. Their work environment can also be noisy and dirty, but should be well-ventilated and lit.


Electroplater looking
(Source: Stuff)

Tools and technologies
  
Electroplaters use acids, alkalis, waxes, lacquers, tapes, metal solutions and other chemicals to clean, treat and plate metal parts. They use a range of plating equipment, such as tanks and baths, as well as brushes and drum washers. Due to their working conditions, electroplaters are required to wear protective clothing, gloves, goggles and earmuffs.

  
Education and training/entrance requirements

You can work as a metal surface finisher without formal qualifications. You will probably get some informal training on the job. Entry to this occupation may be improved if you have qualifications. You may like to consider a VOC qualification in engineering. As subjects and prerequisites can vary between institutions, you should contact your chosen institution for further information.

You can also become a metal surface finisher through a traineeship in Engineering. Entry requirements may vary, but employers generally require Year 10.

To become an electroplater you usually need to undertake a traineeship or an apprenticeship. The production systems (general engineering) (level 3) traineeship usually takes 36 months to complete. The engineering tradesperson fabrication apprenticeship usually takes 42 to 48 months to complete and is available as a school-based apprenticeship.

Apprenticeships and traineeships
  

As an apprentice or trainee, you enter into a formal training contract with an employer, enabling you to complete training towards a nationally recognised qualification. You spend time working and learning practical skills on the job and you spend some time undertaking structured training with a registered training provider.

You can do an apprenticeship or traineeship if you are a school-leaver, re-entering the workforce or as an adult or mature-aged person wishing to change careers. You can even begin your apprenticeship or traineeship while you're still at school.

If you are still at school you can access an apprenticeship through your school. Talk to your school's VET Co-ordinator to start your training now through VET in Schools. If you are no longer at school you can apply for an apprenticeship or traineeship and get paid while you learn and work.


Employment Opportunities
   
Metal surface finishers work for engineering firms, appliance and furniture makers, foundries and fencing manufacturers. They also work for motor vehicle accessory manufacturers, sheetmetal workshops and jobbing (smaller) shops.

 

 

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Material sourced from
Jobs & Skills WA [Powder Coater - Spraypainter; Electroplater; ]
CareerHQ [Spray-painter;]
CareersOnline [Vehicle Painter; Industrial Spray Painter; Metal Surface Finisher; ]
YourCareer [Vehicle Painter; ]
JobOutlook [
Industrial Spraypainter; Vehicle Painters; Electroplaters; ]

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