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Agent - Business Manager (Culture, Music & Performing Arts)
Mime Artist
Voice-over Artist

Related Jobs or Working with these Jobs

 

Artistic and CreativeSkill level 1Skill level 2Skill level 3
Skill level 4Skill level 5

Actors portray roles in both live and recorded or filmed productions. In the live performance area, an actor may perform in theatre, opera or variety. In the recorded medium, an actor may perform roles in Future Growth Strong theatre, film, radio, television, commercials, webisodes, mobisodes or other material distributed via the internet.

Actors use speech and body language to play characters in live and filmed performances. They must do a lot of preparation before a performance. They must read scripts and research subject matter,memorise lines, perfect characterisation and hone acting techniques.

Actors may perform in centuries-old tragedies for live theatre, contemporary drama in television and film, and much more. Many require other skills for their performances, such as singing or dancing. All actors work to entertain, engage and make people ‘think’ by using performance.

ANZSCO ID: 211111

Alternative names: Film Star, Movie Star, Video Star, Performer

Specialisations: Mime Artist, Voice-over Artist.

Actor on stage

Knowledge, skills and attributes

  • determination

  • self-confidence

  • good memory

  • stamina to perform at peak level

  • ability to cope with changing situations.

 

Duties and Tasks

You may be acting alone or as part of a cast of actors. This will depend on the production. Your performance is just a small part of the work.

Actors may perform the following tasks:

  • study scripts, learn a part and interpret the role through speech, gesture and various other performance skills

  • attend auditions for parts in productions, performing prepared or improvised pieces

  • rehearse parts by memorising lines, cues and movements

  • undertake extensive research for certain roles and productions

  • under the guidance of a director, act the part of a film, television, stage or radio character in front of live audiences, cameras or microphones

  • attend costume fittings

  • sing and dance when a script or role requires it.

  • preparing for and going to auditions

  • contacting actors’ agents and finding the next job.

Actors need a great deal of patience and commitment, as most productions require long rehearsal schedules and many hours of memorising lines outside the rehearsal periods.

As an actor you will need to become familiar with your own lines and those of other cast members so that your timing is right. You will also need to understand stage positioning so that you are in the right position on set/stage during the production. You will normally work with other professionals such as make-up artists, camera operators and directors.

Some roles may require you to work with the director and other cast members to interpret the script. This involves using your voice and expression to portray different emotions. It could even include deciding how the character will look and behave. You will also need to very adaptable as you could be asked to play a number of different characters with different personalities.

In smaller theatre companies, other tasks such as administration duties, publicity and staging the performance may be part of the role.

Working conditions

Actors work in varying conditions, depending on the work they are doing. Some work in designated performance spaces like theatres, concert halls, and television or film studios. Others may work outside, sometimes in harsh weather conditions. Rehearsals tend to be repetitive and multiple takes are often required in both television and film. Contact with the public is necessary for actors who perform in front of live audiences. Many are required to travel for work, and may be away from home for long periods of time. Work can often be stressful due to strict deadlines, and the high expectations of audiences and directors.

Tools and technologies

Actors use stage and studio props, which can differ between performances. These range from everyday objects, to other devices created specifically for a production. Sometimes they may use voice-amplifying equipment like microphones. Actors are frequently required to wear costumes and make-up, which can completely change an actor’s appearance.

Les Miserables
(Source: Daily Review)

Education and training/entrance requirements

You can work as an actor without formal qualifications. There are courses available that specialise in acting and it is advisable to undertake some formal training to improve your chances of gaining employment. Acceptance into formal courses is generally closely linked to your acting ability and interest, demonstrated by prior experience and/or an audition piece.

The Certificate IV in Aboriginal Theatre and Diplomas in Acting, Screen Performance, Musical Theatre and Aboriginal Performance are offered at the Western Australian Academy of Performing Arts (WAAPA).

You may like to consider a VOC qualification in acting, performing arts, music theatre or theatre and screen performance. As subjects and prerequisites can vary between institutions, you should contact your chosen institution for further information.

You can also become an actor by completing a degree in acting, drama, performing arts, music theatre or theatre studies. To get into these courses you usually need to gain your HSC/ACT Year 12 with English. Competition for places is strong, and an audition, practical test or interview may be required. A number of institutions in Australia offer degrees in these areas. Institutions have different prerequisites and some have flexible entry requirements. Contact the institutions you are interested in for more information as requirements may change.

Playschool
(Source: ABC Playschool)

Additional Information

Each November, the National Institute of Dramatic Art (NIDA) and the Western Australian Academy of Performing Arts (WAAPA) conduct auditions in most states and territories for their courses. Contact NIDA or WAAPA for further details and application forms. The Victorian College of the Arts (VCA) usually holds auditions in November and early December. Contact VCA for more information.

Employment Opportunities

To be successful as an actor, you will need to gain recognition from industry contacts, such as casting consultants and theatre, film, television and radio producers. Most employment for actors in Australia is provided by theatre companies, firms producing television programmes, the Australian Broadcasting Corporation, advertising agencies making television and radio commercials, and film companies. Most actors move from one medium or type of work to another as opportunities arise.
There may be times when work is easy to find, or when there is a part in a long-term production. At other times, work may be scarce and actors may be out of work for some time. As a result, they may not be able to count on a regular income from acting. Most professional actors hire a talent agent or management agency to represent them and to help find them employment. Actors often have to support themselves between assignments with alternative employment. They sometimes form groups and produce their own work.
Factors that affect demand for an actor's services include the number and type of films, television programmes and stage shows being produced; the level of government, private and corporate funding; and the quality of the individual's work and reputation within the industry.

 

Did You Know?



Mia Wasikowska
Mia's website

Mia Wasikowska (1989 to present) is an Australian actress who was born and raised in Canberra, Australia.

When Mia was 9 she was a promising ballet student, however, due to an injury her dreams of becoming a professional dancer faded when she quit at age 14. Mia then turned her focus towards acting as acting explores imperfections of life and people and she wanted to explore these real life issues through acting.

Mia landed her first role in the movie Suburban Mayhem in 2006 and broke through the acting market in 2010 when she was cast as Alice in Tim Burton’s Alice in Wonderland.
(Source: IMDb)

Mia Wasikowska - Screen Test
https://youtu.be/7X_gjhZNGaI



Mia Wasikowska: Career in Four Minutes
https://youtu.be/7A-FbbtuaKo



Agent or Business Manager
Leisure and Entertainment

 

Service or Persuading Clerical or OrganisingArtistic or CreativeSkill Level 4Skill Level 5
Skill Level 6

Agents or business managers represent and promote artists, performers, and professional athletes in negotiations with current or prospective partners or employers. They handle contracts, tours and other business matters for clients. Future Growth Strong

Agents are the absolute charmers who represent actors, television presenters, authors, scriptwriters, directors, producers, musicians, voice-over artists, singers, models and other professionals in the entertainment industry.

Acting as a liaison between talented individuals and casting directors, film studios, production companies, ad agencies and photographers, agents help their clients to build a successful career in the entertainment industry.

Essentially, talent agents use their knowledge and network of contacts to promote the talented people on their client roster to different film studios, record labels, production companies, theatre companies and other organisations in the entertainment industry. They also negotiate financial deals and contract terms on behalf of their clients.

Agents put in the legwork to make things happen: arranging auditions, submitting headshots, show reels, demos, comp cards and portfolios, and generally spending time on the phone and attending meetings to strike deals and promote their clients to potential employers.

Networking is a huge part of an agent’s job, which means attending swanky parties and other events. Every job has its perks! Agents also spend a lot of time scouting for fresh talent, which means attending gigs, going to shows and tracking down new, exciting performers. Finally, agents act as mentors to their clients, offering advice and guidance on decisions that will potentially change their career, e.g. taking certain jobs or not.

When offering advice like this, agents must be honest and make sure that the credibility and reputation of the artist is taken into account, even when there is the potential for massive financial gain.

ANZSCO ID: 139911

Knowledge, skills and attributes

To become a business manager or agent, you would need:

  • exceptional communication abilities

  • strong negotiation skills

  • financial management capability

  • organisational and time management skills

  • thorough familiarity with, and an interest in, the sports or form of arts for which you represent clients.

Agent Business Manager
(Source: Daily Mail)

 

Duties and Tasks

Agents or business managers:

  • collect fees, commissions, or other payments, according to contract terms
  • discuss strategies with clients for their careers, and explain actions taken on their behalf
  • develop networks of individuals and organisations, and use these contacts to ensure client success
  • book promotional media slots or performances for clients
  • negotiate with managers, promoters, or media companies regarding clients' contractual rights and obligations
  • follow industry trends and deals.

 

Working conditions

Talent agents tend to work long and unsociable hours. Agents thrive on networking opportunities. Therefore, you may be required to schmooze with potential clients in the evenings and at weekends.
You may also be required to travel, both domestically and internationally, on a regular basis.

Your working week may vary. You might generally work standard office hours although you may often need to be flexible, for example to attend performances or speak to contacts in other time zones.  You would be office-based, but would often need to travel to meetings and events. If you represented major clients you could travel internationally. The work can be stressful, as there is strong competition to win and keep the best clients.

You might work in a management agency, or be self-employed, with your own clients in your area of expertise.


Education and training/entrance requirements

There are no specific academic requirements for entry into this industry. However, it may help if you have an undergraduate degree in a relevant subject such as PR, marketing, business studies, management studies, law, performing arts or economics.

A bachelor's degree with a concentration in business, accounting or sports administration usually is a basic requirement to start a job as a business manager or agent. Often, a master's degree or extensive experience is preferred.

Most people get their foot in the door via an internship and then by working as an agent’s assistant.

The majority of your training will be done on-the-job, and it’s likely that you will be dropped in at the deep end. You will either sink or swim.

If you are able to work with a rising star, it can be a quick route to the top; if not, you will need to prove you have consistently good judgment in the clients you choose and you must provide a steady stream of work for them.

Artist representation and management is full of confident people who have a mastery of communication in all forms. If you can understand the needs of your clients and you have top notch communication skills you will be in a great position to go far in this line of work.

Many successful agents go freelance once they have gained sufficient experience and have established a long list of industry contacts. You might even start your own talent agency and employ other agents to work for you.


Mime Artist
Leisure and Entertainment

Clerical or OrganisingArtistic or CreativeSkill Level 3Skill Level 4Skill Level 5

 

Miming is the art of acting without using words. A Mime Artist is a performing artist. A Mime Artist is a form of silent actor. They do not utter a sound but are able to entertain audiences using only movement and expressions.This form of entertainment dates back to Roman times. A Mime Artist usually dresses in black, paints their face white with dark eyes and lips to exaggerate the expressions. White gloves are worn so that audiences are compelled to watch the hand movements too. Future Growth Strong

There are 2 forms of mime: Abstract & Literal

Abstract: The Mime Artist prefers to interpret emotions or feeling rather than acting out a particular story or real-life action. Abstract mime usually does not feature a main character and has no plot. Instead, it focuses on provoking thought about a particular subject by expressing certain feelings or emotions.

Literal: It’s usually funny and tells a story with a plot and characters. Hand gestures and facial expressions are heavily exaggerated to get enhance the comedic moment. Often these stories are funny situations intended to elicit laughter from the audience. Some modern versions of mime also combine these two types into one interesting performance.

In 1952, Paul J. Curtis developed the art form now known as American mime. Different from its traditional, European counterpart, American mime combines acting, play-writing, and pantomime dancing. Modern mimes in America can often be seen blending many eclectic styles as they experiment and push the boundaries of the art form.

ANZSCO ID: 211111
   

Alternative names:
Mime, Pantomime artist,
   

Specialisations:
Pantomine, Absurdity,
   
Knowledge, skills and attributes

  • Audience Interaction skills

  • Body and Facial expression

  • Strong observing of people

 

Mime artists at work
(Source: Job Monkey)


Duties and Tasks

  • researches material (news articles, books, overhearing stories on the bus or train etc)
  • continually thinks up new material
  • practices new material
  • dresses up for the part
  • act out the performance
  • tries to find gigs or events to perform at
  • invoices and keeps books


Working conditions

Mime Artists can work for a circus company, an events company or for independently. They can perform at various events and at corporate and private functions.


Tools and technologies
  
Mimes practice pantomime. The stereotypical mime dresses in a black and white outfit with white makeup covering his face. You may have seen one pretending they are stuck in a box or walking in place. These performers have an uncanny ability to use hand gestures and contorted faces to tell stories, create characters, describe moods, and express ideas. Mime communication is fascinating. The key is that you express yourself through body and facial movements.
  
Education and training/entrance requirements

At this time there does not seem to be any Mime-only qualification, however, a lot of courses/diplomas/degrees in Drama include Mime as part of the curriculum. From there, you could then perfect your art on your own. No formal education necessary, Mime School recommended, street permit
   
Employment Opportunities

Potential Employers: Theatrical Groups, Circuses, Party Planners, Self Employed

 

Did You Know?

A mime artist (from Greek "μίμος"—mimos, "imitator, actor") is someone who uses mime as a theatrical medium or as a performance art, involving miming, or the acting out a story through body motions, without use of speech. In earlier times, in English, such a performer was referred to as a mummer. Miming is to be distinguished from silent comedy, in which the artist is a seamless character in a film or sketch.

The performance of pantomime originates at its earliest in Ancient Greece; the name is taken from a single masked dancer called Pantomimus, although performances were not necessarily silent. In Medieval Europe, early forms of mime such as mummer plays and later dumbshows evolved. In early nineteenth century Paris, Jean-Gaspard Deburau solidified the many attributes that we have come to know in modern times—the silent figure in whiteface.

Jacques Copeau, strongly influenced by Commedia dell'arte and Japanese Noh theatre, used masks in the training of his actors. Étienne Decroux, a pupil of his, was highly influenced by this and started exploring and developing the possibilities of mime and developed corporeal mime into a highly sculptural form, taking it outside of the realms of naturalism. Jacques Lecoq contributed significantly to the development of mime and physical theatre with his training methods.

In film

Prior to the work of Étienne Decroux there was no major treatise on the art of mime, and so any recreation of mime as performed prior to the twentieth century is largely conjecture, based on interpretation of diverse sources. However, the twentieth century also brought a new medium into widespread usage: the motion picture.

The restrictions of early motion picture technology meant that stories had to be told with minimal dialogue, which was largely restricted to intertitles. This often demanded a highly stylized form of physical acting largely derived from the stage. Thus, mime played an important role in films prior to advent of talkies (films with sound or speech). The mimetic style of film acting was used to great effect in German Expressionist film.

Silent film comedians like Charlie Chaplin, Harold Lloyd and Buster Keaton learned the craft of mime in the theatre, but through film, they would have a profound influence on mimes working in live theatre even decades after their death. Indeed, Chaplin may be the most well-documented mime in history.

The famous French comedian, writer and director Jacques Tati achieved his initial popularity working as a mime, and indeed his later films had only minimal dialogue, relying instead on many subtle expertly choreographed visual gags. Tati, like Chaplin before him, would mime out the movements of every single character in his films and ask his actors to repeat them.

On stage and street

Mime has been performed onstage, with Marcel Marceau and his character "Bip" being the most famous. Mime is also a popular art form in street theatre and busking. Traditionally, these sorts of performances involve the actor/actress wearing tight black and white clothing with white facial makeup. However, contemporary mimes often perform without whiteface. Similarly, while traditional mimes have been completely silent, contemporary mimes, while refraining from speaking, sometimes employ vocal sounds when they perform. Mime acts are often comical, but some can be very serious.

Marcel Marceau
The most famous of all Mime Artists was Marcel Marceau (1923 – 2007).
(Source: Orange County Register)

In literature

Canadian author Michael Jacot's first novel, The Last Butterfly, tells the story of a mime artist in Nazi-occupied Europe who is forced by his oppressors to perform for a team of Red Cross observers. Nobel laureate Heinrich Böll's The Clown relates the downfall of a mime artist, Hans Schneir, who has descended into poverty and drunkenness after being abandoned by his beloved. Jacob Appel's Pushcart short-listed story, Coulrophobia, depicts the tragedy of a landlord whose marriage slowly collapses after he rents a spare apartment to an intrusive mime artist.

Greek and Roman mime

The first recorded pantomime actor was Telestēs in the play Seven Against Thebes by Aeschylus. Tragic pantomime was developed by Puladēs of Kilikia; comic pantomime was developed by Bathullos of Alexandria.

The Roman emperor Trajan banished pantomimists; Caligula favored them; Marcus Aurelius made them priests of Apollo. Nero himself acted as a mime.

In non-Western theatre traditions

While most of this article has treated mime as a constellation of related and historically linked Western theatre genres and performance techniques, analogous performances are evident in the theatrical traditions of other civilizations.

Classical Indian musical theatre, although often erroneously labeled a "dance," is a group of theatrical forms in which the performer presents a narrative via stylized gesture, an array of hand positions, and mime illusions to play different characters, actions, and landscapes. Recitation, music, and even percussive footwork sometimes accompany the performance. The Natya Shastra, an ancient treatise on theatre by Bharata Muni, mentions silent performance, or mukhabinaya.

In Kathakali, stories from Indian epics are told with facial expressions, hand signals and body motions. Performances are accompanied by songs narrating the story while the actors act out the scene, followed by actor detailing without background support of narrative song.

The Japanese Noh tradition has greatly influenced many contemporary mime and theatre practitioners including Jacques Copeau and Jacques Lecoq because of its use of mask work and highly physical performance style.

Butoh, though often referred to as a dance form, has been adopted by various theatre practitioners as well.
(Source: Wikipedia)


 

Voice-over Artist
Leisure and Entertainment

Practical or MechanicalArtistic or Creative

Voice-over talent is responsible for recording the off-camera narration or dialogue that accompanies many video productions. Voice-over artists are called upon to read scripts out loud in order to create an overlaying recording that will provide the video’s audience with additional information that is not revealed through the visual shots. The specific role of a voice-over recording varies depending on the type of video it accompanies. In infomercials, commercials and promotional videos, voice-overs can be used to provide additional information on or create excitement about a product or service. Future Growth Strong

Television shows and movies often employ voice-over artists to narrate important plot elements, while documentaries and news broadcasts can use voice-over talent to add commentary and context to video and images.

The key requirements for successful voice-over talent are a good speaking voice and the ability to read a script with the appropriate tone, emotion, clarity and enunciation.

 

ANZSCO ID: 211111
   

Alternative names: Voice Actor,
   

Specialisations: There are different genre for voice actors eg. Audio Book Voice Actor, movies, commercials, videos, games, TV show announcer,
   

Knowledge, skills and attributes

Voice artists have exceptional talent in regard to their vocal abilities. Just by modulating their voices, they can make the audience understand that their character feels happy, sad, excited or angry. Listeners don't need to see their facial expressions or body language to understand what's going on, but voice actors do sometimes work alongside animators or previously filmed material to bring visual art to life.

Voice actors are responsible for honing their talent, understanding how to take direction, and taking care of their vocal health. They may need to remain on call for quick assignments, learn how to use certain technical equipment, and market themselves to secure consistent work.

Early in their careers, voice artists may take on a variety of roles simply to gain industry experience and to build a portfolio. Over time, voice actors may decide to focus on one particular genre or specialty based on their skills.

For example, voice actors who read audio books must be proficient in numerous accents in order to differentiate each character's dialogue. Other voice actors can develop one notable accent, such as a neutral accent for advertisements or the gravelly tone often used in movie trailer voice-overs.

Voice actors who record the audio for animated characters – whether for movies, TV shows or video games – are often asked to gesture and to use their bodies to supplement their voice-acting skills so the animation team can study them and create realistic movements for the characters. Finally, voice actors responsible for dubbing foreign language films have to mimic what's already on the screen in order to create believable audio.

Like many other creative pursuits, voice acting requires constant practice in order to establish proficiency in basic skills and to push for better and better results. It's not enough simply to go through voice acting training and then consider yourself a voice actor. Many voice actors regularly work with a coach in order to learn new accents and impressions, increase their vocal range or practice acting out different scenarios.

For example, voice actors must be able to correctly pronounce and enunciate words in a neutral or generic accent that audiences can easily understand. However, voice actors can land more opportunities (and potentially earn more) if they can also pronounce and enunciate words in regional and foreign accents, or in such a way that makes them sound like a much younger or older person. For example, The Simpsons features just six main cast members who distinctly do voice over for 100 recurring characters. Voice artists who aim for a gig this reliable and well-known should work to develop many distinct voices in their repertoire.

Voice actors do more than just speak, however. They're also asked to sigh, groan, scream, gasp or breathe heavily, all on command and typically over and over again in slightly different variations until the director is happy with the quality and variety of takes. The ability to sing also comes in handy, although it's not uncommon for a singer to be brought in for musical numbers if needed.

Mike Myers as Shrek's voice
Mike Myers is the Voice of Shrek
(Source: The Sun UK)

 

  • Ability to Take Direction and Improve: Voice actors work closely with directors to create the perfect take. It all starts with the voice actor's initial interpretation of the script and of the character. A well-written script will include some direction for how each line is meant to be said. For example, "Will you be coming tonight?" could be said in dozens of ways, from spooky to sad to excited, depending on the scene. The voice actor should be able to know what's most appropriate simply by reading the script. But during the recording session, the director will help fine-tune the voice actor's performance even further. The voice artist might be asked to place particular emphasis on a word, raise or lower the pitch of their voice, or simply inject more energy into the phrase. A voice actor who can instantly reproduce these directions is a valuable asset and considered easy to work with. On the other hand, someone who gives the same performance over and over or who constantly argues with the director may not get the part or may fail to have their contract renewed.

  • Be On Call for Gigs: Voice actors must exhibit other signs of professionalism as well, such as the ability to show up at the studio on time and warmed up for the task ahead. This can prove a little tricky for voice artists who may be expected to remain on call for their work. Recording studios might book a session with a voice actor with plenty of advanced notice, but they might also call voice artists with urgent requests. Production schedules often change on a moment's notice, and accommodating and flexible voice actors may be considered for more gigs. Communicating promptly about any issues is also important for building a positive reputation. If you need to cancel or reschedule a session, it's important to let your agent or the production assistant know right away.

 

Eddie Murphy as Donkey
Eddie Murphy as the Voice of Donkey
(Source: The Sun UK)

  • Vocal Chord Health and Care: One reason why you might need to reschedule your recording session is poor vocal chord health. Losing your voice is a major concern for anyone who sings or speaks for a living, but it can be prevented. When your income relies on the health of your vocal chords, one of your duties or responsibilities is to pamper your voice. According to Music Industry How To, that means not yelling, whispering or coughing (when you're not in the recording studio, of course) and avoiding alcohol and cigarettes. You should also rest your voice periodically and conduct voice warm-up exercises every morning – even before normal speech.

  • Technical Skills Are a Plus: Voice actors don't always have to go to a studio to record their sessions. With the right set-up at home, you can produce quality recordings without even leaving your house. However, you won't get immediate feedback from the director, and you'll also be responsible for managing all the equipment and sending the sound files to the production team. If the audio quality doesn't sound great on playback, you might be expected to clean it up yourself, especially if you're working with smaller clients who want a ready-to-use clip. This can mean extra work for you and a less efficient process overall, but the trade-off to working from home is being able to live wherever you want.

  • Marketing Skills for Career Advancement: As with any type of acting career, voice actors must become masters of self-promotion, especially early on. Being able to market yourself – especially online through a website or social media profile – can help you land more gigs.

Eventually you will build an impressive voice acting portfolio and earn invitations to voice acting auditions through word-of-mouth networking. But it can take years to reach this point. Other possibilities include working with a talent agency that finds work for you, but you may have less control over the type of work you do through this avenue. Even related jobs like announcing events, moderating debates and Q&A panels, and hosting podcasts and radio shows demonstrate your voice talent and help you to meet people in the industry.

 

Antonio Banderas
Antonio Banderas as the Voice of Puss in Boots [and also played Zorro!]
(Source: The Sun UK)


Duties and Tasks

  • Bringing the script off the page: the primary role of a voice-over artist is to read a pre-written script out loud in order to make a voice recording that will overlay a video production. Developing a strong and clear speaking voice is a crucial part of the process of bringing the script to life in the voice-over artist’s narration. In addition, the voice-over talent is often called upon to employ a range of acting techniques in order to bring life and emotion to the script while maintaining a correct and believable attitude and tone.

  • Conveying the message: every voice-over project will have a different message depending on the purpose of the video it accompanies. For example, the voice-over narration for a public service announcement will need to leave an emotional impression on the audience, while the message of the voice-over accompanying a commercial may be excitement about the advertised product. In each case, the voice-over talent will need to decide how to convey the video’s message through the tenor and attitude of their narration.

  • Crafting a voice: depending on the role of the voice-over narration in a particular video production, the voice-over artist may be asked to create a distinctive voice in which to read the script. For commercial work, this unique voice may help with branding, while fictional pieces such as television shows may require the creation of a certain type of character and voice. Voice-over talent will need to rely heavily on any acting experience or training in order to accomplish this task.

  • Creating alternate versions: certain video productions will require that the voice-over talent record several different versions of the script. In these variations, the voice-over talent may be asked to read the script in a different tone of voice or to emphasize different words or sentences. The goal of creating alternate versions is to allow the video’s director to choose the voice-over narration that best matches the purpose of the video.

 


Working conditions

Most voice-over work is done in a recording studio. The actor will typically read from a script into a microphone to create an audio recording. The recording will then be edited by audio or sound technicians for future use. Typically, larger cities will have more recording studios for voice-over work. Cities likeSydney and Melbourne will likely have a greater need for voice-over actors, for example. However, with higher-quality recording equipment becoming more affordable, a growing number of voice-over actors record their work from home and send it to clients online.


Education and training/entrance requirements

Voice-over actors don't need a formal degree as long as they have a talent with their voices. Some actors may choose to pursue degrees in acting, theatre, or voice studies, but oftentimes, taking regular voice or acting lessons or courses is enough when combined with practical experience.

Aside from being able to skillfully control the voice, the ability to read eloquently from a script is also important. A voice-over actor may be asked to read a script several times in different ways, emphasizing different words and using different emotions or accents. Being flexible with last-minute adjustments is also important.


Employment Opportunities

Because there is no formal degree requirement to become a voice-over actor, people pursuing this highly competitive career path may find employment through talent agencies or open auditions. These aspiring actors have often completed university-level courses in acting and voice, as well. To find work in the field, many voice-over actors record a professional demo CD and distribute it to agencies or potential clients. Some voice actors may also partner with a recording studio to keep their recordings on file for future clients. Taking on a variety of jobs and building a vocal portfolio will help improve expertise and skills in the field.

 

 

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Artist

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Umpire/Referee

Composer

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Entertainer

theatrical costume maker and designer

Diver

Set Designer

Sports Development Officer

Horse Riding Instructor

Stage Manager

Cinema or Theatre Manager

Prop & Scenery Maker

Outdoor Adventure Guide

Tennis Coach

Artist

Aerobics Instructor

Dancer

Fitness Instructor

Sports Coach

Karate Instructor

Fisher

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Umpire/Referee

Composer

Jockey

Actor

Choreographer

Music Director

Stunt Performer

Entertainer

theatrical costume maker and designer

Diver

Set Designer

Sports Development Officer

Horse Riding Instructor

Stage Manager

Cinema or Theatre Manager

Prop & Scenery Maker

Outdoor Adventure Guide

Tennis Coach

Artist

Aerobics Instructor

Dancer

Fitness Instructor

Sports Coach

Karate Instructor

Fisher

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Umpire/Referee

Composer

Jockey

Actor

 

Choreographer

Music Director

Stunt Performer

Entertainer

theatrical costume maker and designer

Diver

Set Designer

Sports Development Officer

Horse Riding Instructor

Stage Manager

Cinema or Theatre Manager

Prop & Scenery Maker

Outdoor Adventure Guide

Tennis Coach

Artist

Aerobics Instructor

Dancer

Fitness Instructor

Sports Coach

Karate Instructor

Fisher

Sportsperson

Musician

Umpire/Referee

Composer

Jockey

Actor

Choreographer

Music Director

Stunt Performer

Entertainer

theatrical costume maker and designer

Diver

Set Designer

Sports Development Officer

Horse Riding Instructor

Stage Manager

Cinema or Theatre Manager

Prop & Scenery Maker

Outdoor Adventure Guide

Tennis Coach

Artist

Aerobics Instructor

Dancer

Fitness Instructor

Sports Coach

Karate Instructor

Fisher

Sportsperson

Musician

Umpire/Referee

Composer

Jockey

Actor

Choreographer

Music Director

Stunt Performer

Entertainer

theatrical costume maker and designer

Diver

Set Designer

Sports Development Officer

Horse Riding Instructor

Stage Manager

Cinema or Theatre Manager

Prop & Scenery Maker

Outdoor Adventure Guide

Tennis Coach

 

Artist

Aerobics Instructor

Dancer

Fitness Instructor

Sports Coach

Karate Instructor

Fisher

Sportsperson

Musician

Umpire/Referee

Composer

Jockey

Actor

Choreographer

Music Director

Stunt Performer

Entertainer

theatrical costume maker and designer

Diver

Set Designer

Sports Development Officer

Horse Riding Instructor

Stage Manager

Cinema or Theatre Manager

Prop & Scenery Maker

Outdoor Adventure Guide

Tennis Coach