Special Care Worker

Community and Health

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Aged & Disabled Carer
Disability Support Worker

Orientation & Mobility Specialist

 

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Service or PersuadingHelping or advisingSkill Level 1Skill Level 2Skill Level 3

Special care workers provide care, supervision and support for children, people with disabilities and aged people in residential establishments, in their own homes and institutional facilities, and provide care and support to people in refuges.  FutureGrowthModerate

ANZSCO ID: 4234

Alternative names: Home Health Aide

Specialisations:

  • Attendant Care Worker - An attendant care worker concentrates on providing personal care assistance to people with disability in the home or workplace. These duties may include bathing, lifting, moving, dressing, grooming, exercising or feeding people with disabilities.

  • Home Care Worker - A home care worker provides in-home assistance and care for people unable to care for themselves and/or their families because of sickness, disability or old age.

  • Mother's Helper - A mother's helper assists new mothers with the additional work involved with the arrival of a new baby. They also care for other children, clean and cook meals.


Knowledge, skills and attributes

  • patience, flexibility and understanding

  • supportive and caring nature

  • able to accept responsibility

  • good communication skills

  • able to work as part of a team

  • able to cope with the physical demands of the job

  • able to perform domestic duties efficiently.

Special Care Worker
(Source: Barnardos)

Duties and Tasks

Special care workers may perform the following tasks:

  • planning and implementing programs of supervision and care for children in residential care

  • supervising and arranging activities to enhance the physical, social, emotional and intellectual development of children in residential care

  • waking children and ensuring they are washed, dressed, fed and ready for educational and recreational activities

  • supervising children during domestic activities such as eating meals and showering

  • maintaining discipline, enforcing regulations and behaviour standards, compiling disciplinary reports and assisting in implementing remedial measures

  • assist people with their self-medication

  • plan and implement programs of supervision and care for those in residential care

  • provide in-home support with health issues and daily living tasks such as washing, dressing, eating, transport and budgeting

  • supervise and arrange activities to enhance the physical, social, emotional and intellectual development of those in residential care

  • make sure that those in residential care are washed, dressed, fed and ready for educational and recreational activities

  • supervise those in residential care during domestic activities such as eating meals and showering

  • provide companionship and support during daily activities for those who are sick or aged

  • cook and serve meals, clean premises, wash, iron and perform other household tasks

  • organise refuge accommodation

  • implement appropriate strategies for managing problems related to dementia

  • providing emotional support to residents of refuges

  • referring residents of refuges for health and welfare assistance

  • ensuring security of refuge

  • work with a team of health professionals, family, friends and carers to implement a program of support.


Working conditions

Special care workers work in private homes and community establishments. They may be required to work evenings, weekends and public holidays and may be required to live on the premises.

Education and training/entrance requirements

You can work as a Special Care Worker without formal qualifications, however, they may be useful. A course in residential care, community services, social services, child, youth, and family intervention, or related studies might be helpful.

Did You Know?


In 2003 the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) estimated that 3,958,300 people or 20% of the Australian population had a disability.


Disabled World
(Source: Disabled World)


Has this figure changed?

 

Aged & Disabled Carer
Community and Health

Service or PersuadingHelping or advisingSkill Level 3

Aged and Disabled Carers provide general household assistance, emotional support, care and companionship for aged and disabled persons in their own homes. Future Growth Very Strong

Aged care workers provide care, supervision and support for aged people in residential establishments, clinics, hospitals and private residence. They assist with the maintenance of personal care, domestic duties and management of illness. They also provide companionship and emotional support, and promote independence and community participation.

ANZSCO ID: 4231

Alternative names: Care Service Worker; Aged Care Worker; Home Care Worker; Nursing Assistant (Aged Care); Personal Care Worker (Aged Care); and, Residential Care Worker

Knowledge, skills and attributes

  • Patient, flexible and understanding

  • Supportive and caring nature Special Care Worker with Elderly Man

  • Commitment to the rights of the elderly to live dignified lives

  • Able to accept responsibility

  • Good communication skills

  • Able to work as part of a team

  • Able to cope with the physical demands of the job

  • Able to perform domestic duties efficiently

Duties and Tasks

  • accompanying aged and disabled persons during daily activities

  • assisting clients with their mobility

  • preparing food for clients

  • arranging social activities

  • performing housekeeping tasks such as vacuuming and cleaning

  • assisting in personal hygiene and dressing

  • providing companionship, friendship and emotional support during daily activities

  • may do shopping and run errands

  • may live in with the person

  • assist people with self-medication

  • implement care programmes for those in residential establishments

  • provide in-home support with health issues and daily living tasks such as washing, dressing, eating, transport and budgeting

  • assist with the delivery of activities to enhance the physical, social, emotional and intellectual development of those in their care

  • ensure those in their care are washed, dressed, fed and ready for educational and recreational activities

  • assist during domestic activities such as eating meals and showering

  • cook and serve meals, clean premises, wash, iron and perform other household tasks

  • organise refuge accommodation

  • implement appropriate strategies for managing problems related to dementia

  • work with a team of health professionals, family, friends

Working conditions

Aged care workers work in private homes and community establishments and may be required to work evenings, weekends and public holidays, or live on the premises. Aged care workers may work in a variety of settings, including residential aged-care facilities, day therapy centres and special dementia care units. They may visit clients in their homes. Some positions may be casual.

Education and training/entrance requirements

To become an aged care worker you usually have to complete a VET qualification in ageing support or individual support. As subjects and prerequisites can vary between institutions, you should contact your chosen institution for further information. You can also become an aged care worker through a traineeship.

To work as an aged care worker, you must obtain a National Police Certificate and a Provide First Aid Certificate. An additional employment screening is conducted in South Australia. A drivers licence is essential for those providing community and home support care.


 

Disability Support Worker
Community and Health

Service or PersuadingHelping or advisingSkill Level 1

Disability support workers provide care, supervision and support for people with disabilities in the home, residential establishments, clinics and hospitals. They also work with other health professionals Future Growth Very Strong to maximise the individual's physical and mental wellbeing. They also provide companionship and emotional support, and when possible, promote independence and community participation.

ANZSCO ID: 411712

Knowledge, skills and attributes

  • Patient, flexible and understanding

  • Supportive and caring nature

  • Commitment to the rights of people with disabilities to live dignified lives

  • Able to accept responsibility

  • Good communication skills

  • Able to work as part of a team

  • Able to cope with the physical demands of the job

  • Able to perform domestic duties efficiently


Disability Support Worker

(Source: Good Universities Guide)

Duties & Tasks

  • assist people with self-medication

  • implement care programs for those in residential establishments

  • provide in-home support with health issues and daily living tasks such as washing, dressing, eating, transport and budgeting

  • assist with the delivery of activities to enhance the physical, social, emotional and intellectual development of those in their care

  • ensure that those in their care are washed, dressed, fed and ready for educational and recreational activities

  • assist those in their care during domestic activities such as eating meals and showering

  • provide companionship and support during daily activities

  • cook and serve meals, clean premises, wash, iron and perform other household tasks

  • organise refuge accommodation

  • work with a team of health professionals, family, friends and carers to implement a program of support.


Working conditions

Disability support workers work in private homes and community establishments. They may be required to work evenings, weekends and public holidays and may be required to live on the premises. Some positions may be casual.

Education and training/entrance requirements

You can work as a disability support worker without formal qualifications. You will probably get some informal training on the job. Entry to this occupation may be improved if you have qualifications or experience working with people who require care. You may like to consider a VET qualification. As subjects and prerequisites can vary between institutions, you should contact your chosen institution for further information. You can also become a disability support worker through a traineeship. Special Care Worker with person with disability

To work with children, you must obtain a Working with Children Check, National Police Certificate and Provide First Aid Certificate. A drivers licence and form of transport is essential for those providing community and home support care.


 

 

 

Orientation & Mobility Specialist
Community and Health

Service or PersuadingPractical or MechanicalSkill Level 5Skill Level 6

Orientation and mobility specialists teach people who are blind or have low vision to move around their environment safely and with confidence. They usually work on a one-to-one basis. People with low vision may need training in how to use technology like GPS to find their way to destinations, and an orientation and mobility specialist helps with that as well as instructing the blind in how to find locations at school or work. FutureGrowthModerate

They assist blind people in learning how to use guide dogs, and provide motivation and encouragement towards exploring and mastering new fields of activity. Orientation and mobility (O&M) specialists teach individuals with visual impairments to travel safely, confidently and independently in their environment. They work with infants, children and adults usually on a one-to-one basis in a home, school, hospital or in the community. Orientation and mobility specialists are different from physical therapists, because they focus on people with vision loss.

These specialists may also work in a consultative role, helping architects, city planners, and traffic engineers to make buildings, intersections, and other areas more accessible and safe for visually impaired people.

ANZSCO ID: 252200

Alternative names: Orientation and Mobility Teacher, Orientation and Mobility Instructor, O&M Specialist,

Knowledge, skills and attributes       

  • good physical health - must be able to be physical for many hours to help their patients as needed. They must be able to bend, twist, lift, crouch, kneel, push/pull, and the agility to move quickly and ensure patient safety.
  • a desire to work with people with disabilities
  • observant, patient and reliable
  • strong communication skills 
  • record keeping - must be able to collect and integrate patient histories to solve problems and develop treatments.
  • emotional stability - must be able to handle the emotional stress of working with impaired patients in need of compassionate health care.
  • multitasking - the ability to prioritize and manage multiple tasks simultaneously.
  • interpersonal - must be able to interact with patients and their families regardless of background.
  • reasoning - must be able to apply facts and principles to issues to determine conclusions and solve problems. They must use knowledge and logic to find patterns in injuries and determine causes and provide solutions.
  • communication - must be able to clearly convey thoughts and ideas to gauge patient's issues and convey to them the best path to treatment.
  • empathy - must be compassionate and able to empathize with a patient's pain and other difficulties. They are able to make people feel comfortable and meet them at their emotional level to humanize themselves and let people know they care.
  • patience - they must understand it takes time to see results and be willing to put in that time. They also must help their clients have patience--especially if they are trying to overcome a difficult injury.
  • problem solving - must be able to use knowledge to gauge issues and determine the best route to autonomy.
  • dexterity - must work well with your hands and be nimble. You will be put in situations where physical therapy is a must.

Orientation and Mobility Specialist
(Source: Explore Health Careers)

Duties and Tasks

Orientation and mobility specialists may perform the following tasks:

  • teach people who are blind or have low vision to use their remaining eyesight and their other senses (sound, touch, smell and the sensation of body movement) to detect landmarks and reference points and move safely through their environment
  • instruct and assess clients in the use of mobility aids such as long canes, which give information to users about the surface over which they are about to walk
  • instruct and assess clients in the use of electronic travel devices where appropriate (these devices give off vibrating or audible signals when obstacles are ahead)
  • work with parents of young children and infants who are blind or have low vision to encourage the development of skills and concepts related to their bodies, their environment and the wider community
  • provide advice/consultation related to the needs of people who are blind or have low vision about access to the built environment, access and use of public transport and finding information e.g. accessible maps
  • consult with other professions, groups or individuals
  • work as part of a team of specialists to provide a range of services for people who are blind or have low vision, which might include occupational therapists, diversional therapists, physiotherapists, optometrists, orthoptists, doctors or teachers

They teach skills in the following areas:OM Specialist

Sensory development: Help people maximize all of their senses to help them know where you are and where you want to go
 
Using senses with self-protective techniques: Teach patients how to move safely through indoor and outdoor environments
  
Cane and Walking Tools: Teach others to use a cane and other devices to walk safely and efficiently
  
Soliciting and/or declining assistance: Help patients get comfortable asking for help when they need it, or doing things on their own when you don't.
  
Finding destination strategies: Teach how to follow directions according to disability and use landmarks and compass directions
  
Mobility Techniques: best practices for crossing streets, such as analyzing and identifying intersections and traffic patterns

  
Working conditions

Orientation and mobility specialists facing challenging, highly varied working conditions due to the need to meet the requirements of extremely diverse clients. Their work involves both one-on-one contact with clients while providing mobility teaching services, and offering professional consultative service to government agencies, hospital administrators, healthcare personnel, educational organizations, and others.

A specialist in this field is called on to work effectively in a range of settings – private homes, assisted living facilities, hospitals, rehabilitation centers, and so on – while offering clients individualized, compassionate, and effective training in learning how to meet their unique mobility needs. Patience and adaptability are indispensable and the mobility specialist must realize there is no “standard” job or set of solutions.

Orientation and mobility specialists work both indoors and outdoors and usually need to be in good physical condition, as well as good communicators.

In a typical day, an orientation and mobility specialist might orient a college student who is blind to locate classes, the cafeteria and the library on a college campus; instruct a young adult who has low vision in the use of a GPS device; and teach a man who is visually impaired to cross two busy streets to get to the gym after work. On another day, the specialist might orient a 30-year-old blinded veteran with a dog guide to her new job site; motivate an infant who is totally blind to engage in purposeful movement towards a musical toy; provide counseling to a high school junior who recently lost his vision and will not be able to get his driver’s license.

Tools and technologies

People with low vision may need training in how to use technology like GPS to find their way to destinations, and an orientation and mobility specialist helps with that.

Education and training/entrance requirements

To become an orientation and mobility specialist you usually have to complete a degree in health science, human services, social science, behavioural science or a related field, followed by a postgraduate qualification in orientation and mobility. To get into the degree courses you usually need to gain your HSC/ACT Year 12. Prerequisite subjects, or assumed knowledge, in one or more of English, mathematics, biology, chemistry and physics are normally required. Most universities in Australia offer degrees in these areas. Entry to postgraduate courses usually requires completion of an appropriate bachelor degree.

Universities have different prerequisites and some have flexible entry requirements.

Additional Information
  

In NSW, before undertaking work placements required by courses, students may be required to obtain a National Police Certificate, a Provide First Aid Certificate, immunisations and a Working with Children Check (NSW) or a Working with Vulnerable People Check (ACT).

A current drivers licence is usually required.

Employment Opportunities

Orientation and mobility specialists may work with clients in their homes or in training centres, hospitals, schools or places of employment. They also work for organisations such as guide dog associations and Vision Australia.

Employment opportunities may increase with the ageing of the population.

 

 

 

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Vet

Firefighter

Garbage Collector

Midwife

Paramedic

Teacher

Dentist

physio

Optometrist

Chaplain

Nurse

Child Care Worker

Social Worker

Real Estate Agent

Special Care Worker

Chiropractor

Medical Practitioner

Ophthalmologist

Audiologist

Podiatrist

Medical Imaging Technologist

  Speech Pathologist

Occupational Therapist

Natural Therapist

SES Officer

Art Therapist

Dermatologist

Psychiatrist

Plastic or Reconstructive Surgeon

acupuncturist

Osteopath

Paediatrician

Neurologist

Indigenous Community Worker

Oncologist

Sports Doctor

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Cardiologist

House Parent

Rheumatologist

Community Worker

Youth Worker

Anaesthetist

Intensive Care Specialist

Surgeon

Medical Radiation Therapist