Retirement Nursing Home Manager

Community and Health

 

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Nursing Assistant (Aged Care)/Nursing Support Worker

Related Jobs or Working with these Jobs

 

Helping or advisingClerical or OrganisingSkill Level 3Skill Level 4Skill Level 5

Nursing homes provide care and support for elderly, handicapped, or disabled individuals who cannot care for themselves at home. Some are government-run and -funded facilities, while others are privately owned. Regardless of how they're run, however, all nursing homes need administrators to manage the facility and to direct staff. A nursing home administrator serves as the point of contact for the venue, making critical decisions and managing the budget. Future Growth Strong

Some nursing home administrators work in facilities with other names, such as senior homes, retirement communities, and assisted living facilities. Each of these venues provides a different level of care to residents, but professionals in the administration position serve similar roles. A nursing home typically provides more care to residents, including those who are unable to move or speak on their own.

Retirement village managers are responsible for managing the operations of residences that provide a range of services to retirees and seniors.

They oversee the employment, training and professional development of staff, the scheduled maintenance of buildings, the tracking and planning of budgets and financial targets, and the coordination of residential services.

Depending on the size and capacity of the establishment, a retirement village manager may manage sports facilities, village transport, social clubs, restaurants, and other recreational amenities.

Retirement Village Managers organise and control the day-to-day operations of retirement villages to provide a range of accommodation, personal care services, and recreational and social activities for the use and enjoyment of residents.

ANZSCO ID: 141912

Alternative names:
Retirement Village Manager; Nursing Home Administrator


Knowledge, skills and attributes

To become a retirement or nursing home manager, you would need:

  • strong people skills and communication skills
  • good observational skills
  • experience of assessing an individual's care and support needs
  • the ability to negotiate contracts
  • financial management and budgeting skills
  • the ability to maintain accurate records
  • knowledge of relevant legislation, local services and resources.

Talking to residents
(Source: Career Builder)

Duties and Tasks

  • Plans, directs and co-ordinates the organisation, it's administration and the operation of the establishment.
  • Hiring, training, and firing nursing home staff members, from clinical workers to administrative personnel.
  • Conducting performance reviews on employees to determine effectiveness and work ethic.
  • Meeting with prospective residents to tour the facility and to learn about the services provided.
  • Communicating with residents and prospective residents as well as their families.
  • Working with clinical staff to create a plan of care for each resident and to oversee residents' progress and condition.
  • Advocating for residents so they receive the standard of care they deserve.
  • Instituting policies, rules, and procedures for the facility to protect everyone involved and to comply with governmental regulations.
  • Establishing a practical budget for the facility and allocating funds to specific departments or expenses as needed.
  • Overseeing the billing of residents for services rendered.
  • Managing janitorial and support staff to ensure the facility remains clean and well-run.
  • Leading teams in the nursing home to ensure all staff members meet goals and fulfill residents' expectations.
  • Deciding when to send residents to other health care facilities, such as hospitals and rehabilitation centers.
  • Overseeing the transportation of residents to other facilities or locations.
  • Serving as an agent of change to ensure the nursing home evolves with the times.
  • Upgrading equipment and technology in the facility to reflect the changing needs of its residents.
  • Making presentations to the nursing home's board of directors or other executive team.
  • Brainstorming solutions for financial or practical problems that arise during the facility's operation.
  • Providing regular safety training for all personnel.
  • Helping families cope with their loved one's condition and progress.
  • Coordinating visits from other health care professionals, such as physicians and occupational therapists.
  • Scheduling social or physical activities for residents based on their abilities.
  • Maintains standards required by hygiene, safety and other relevant regulations.
  • Engages and trains staff, as well as establishes and maintains standards of staff performance and services to residents.
  • manage a facility that might cater for older people, people with physical or mental disabilities, or the terminally ill
  • monitor and manage the financial performance of the facility
  • recruit, train and supervise staff
  • negotiate contracts with service providers
  • develop and implement policies and practices regarding quality standards
  • make sure the quality of the service and care provided meets national minimum standards
  • liaise with a range of medical professionals
  • promote the rights and responsibilities of residents
  • provide information, advice and support to residents, their families and carers
  • create the opportunity for residents to contribute to the local community and access local services.
  • Plans budgets and authorises expenditure.
  • Keeps appropriate records.
  • Exercises public relations and marketing responsibilities.
  • Handles resident complaints.

 

Helping a resident
(Source: Career Builder)

Working conditions

Retirement village managers can work managing different types of accommodation offering a variety of services. This can include serviced apartments and lifestyle villages.

Most retirement village managers work indoors, in an office, however, in some cases they may be required to oversee maintenance, or supervise the outdoor operations of a residential facility.

As part of a facility's management team, a nursing home administrator works in an office setting, though he or she might also move to other parts of the facility when needed. Since an administrator has to oversee and fill out significant amounts of paperwork, he or she might spend the majority of the day sitting down behind a desk.

They can sometimes endure high stress levels depending on the working conditions. For instance, some days might involve numerous patient transfers and other events that require coordination. Consequently, administrators must know how to manage stress effectively and how to stay calm during stressful situations.

Since nursing home administrators often have clinical experience, they might have to assume clinical roles throughout the day. For instance, if an aid or nurse calls in sick, the administrator can pick up the slack. Patient care remains a top priority in any facility, so administrators must prioritize patient care over administrative duties.

Tools and technologies

Retirement village managers will perform many of their tasks on a computer. They may use word processing and budgeting software for tasks such as record keeping, budget monitoring and contract management. They may spend considerable time on the phone, communicating with prospective clients and organising events for the retirement village.


Education and training/entrance requirements

To become a retirement village manager you usually need to gain a qualification in business or management or a related field. Most employers will also require those working in management roles to have experience using leadership skills in a related industry or occupation.

The Diploma of Leadership and Management and Diploma of Business are offered at TAFE colleges and other registered training organisations throughout Australia.


Nursing Support Assistant Aged Care
Community and Health

Practical or MechanicalClerical or OrganisingHelping or advisingSkill Level 3Skill Level 4

Nursing Support Workers provide limited patient care under the direction of nursing staff. FutureGrowthModerateNursing Support and Personal Care Workers help nurses to provide patients with direct support and services in health and community centre's as well as private residences. They should be understanding and helpful with patients and be able to perform a variety of functions and services.

ANZSCO ID: 423312


Alternative names: Assistant in Nursing, Nursing Assistant (Aged Care)

Specialisations: Paramedical Aide.

Knowledge, skills and attributes

  • Coordination Skills

  • Critical Thinking Skills

  • Perceptiveness

  • Strong Attention to Details

  • Strong Communication Skills

Nursing Support
(Source: HCA Home)


Duties and Tasks

  • Assists patients with their personal care needs such as showering, dressing and eating.

  • Assists patients with their mobility and communication needs.

  • Participates in planning the care of individuals.

  • Follows therapy plans such as interventions to assist those with dementia and behavioural problems.

  • Observes and reports changes in patients' conditions, and reports complaints about care.

  • Assists with rehabilitation exercises.

  • Provides basic treatment and delivery of medications.

  • Adhere to specialised care or treatment for elderly, mental health patients and patients with disabilities

  • Assist nurses, doctors, physical and occupational therapists in treatments and rehabilitation movements while treating patients

  • Assist patients with personal requests to ensure they are comfortable and to minimise pain or discomfort

  • Collaborate with nurses or health care workers to understand individual patient circumstances and plan for recovery

  • Help patients perform basic activities such as eating, showering and changing in hospitals, doctors offices, residential care and private homes

  • Notify nurses and doctors of patients development and reaction to treatments and medications

  • Provide routine sterilisation and cleaning of patient rooms, linens and garments and maintain personal cleanliness and sterilisation to prevent infections from spreading


Working conditions

Nursing Support and Personal Care Workers typically work weekly rotating schedules based on health or community centre operations or individual patient needs. They typically need to work long evening and early morning hours for hospital and residential care settings as well as occasional weekends. They should be able to provide some physical labour, helping to lift immobile patients and moving and cleaning equipment.

Education and training/entrance requirements

Either extensive experience or a formal qualification in health services assistance is needed to work as a Nursing Support Worker. VET (Vocational Education and Training) and university are both common study pathways for Nursing Support Workers.

 

 

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Material sourced from
Jobs & Skills WA [Retirement Village Manager;
]
CareerHQ [Retirement or Nursing Home Manager; ]
Career Builder [Nursing Home Administrator; ]
Open Universities [Nursing Support/Personal Care Worker; ]
JobOutlook [Retirement Village Managers;
Nursing Support Workers]




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