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Real Estate Agency Principal
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Service or PersuadingClerical or OrganisingSkill Level 3Skill Level 4

A real estate agent carries out the functions of a real estate salesperson and manages the activities of other real estate salespersons. Real estate salespeople arrange the sale of houses,  businesses, flats, factories, shops and farms on behalf of the owners. FutureGrowthModerate

Real estate sales representatives arrange the sale and leasing of different properties, under the supervision of a licensed real estate agent. They provide property owners with an estimated market value of their property. Once a price has been agreed upon, a real estate agency salesperson takes responsibility for marketing the property, conducting home opens and viewings with potential buyers. During these viewings a real estate sales representative will answer questions from potential buyers about the property and the surrounding neighbourhood, highlighting key features.


ANZSCO ID & description: 612114: Arranges the conduct of real estate transactions such as sales and leasing, and assists buyers to find suitable properties, on behalf of an agency. Registration or licensing is required.

Alternative names: Real Estate Salesperson, Real Estate Subagent, Realtor,

Specialisations: Property Portfolio Officer, Real Estate Agent, Real Estate Valuer

Real estate salespersons may specialise in areas such as residential, commercial or business sales.

Knowledge, skills and attributes

  • excellent communication skills and negotiation skills
  • a personable demeanour
  • high ethical standards
  • strong sales focus
  • excellent organisational and time management skills
  • able to network effectively
  • good working knowledge of the local area
  • to enjoy working with people

Real Estate Agent sold
(Source: MyInterest)

 

Duties and Tasks

Real estate salespeople may perform the following tasks:

Working conditions

Real estate sales representatives work largely in offices, though they also regularly visit properties to provide owners with valuations or conduct viewings with potential buyers. They work long hours, which may include evenings and weekends. However, there is a great deal of flexibility in the hours worked.

This occupation involves a great deal of contact with the public and with associated professionals, such as builders, solicitors, conveyancers, and banking and local government personnel.


Tools and Technologies

Because real estate sales people spend a lot of time visiting clients it is essential that they have a drivers licence and access to a car. With many properties for sale or rent now listed online there is an increasing need for real estate salespeople to use laptop computers, mobile phones and digital cameras while visiting properties.

Some real estate salespeople may be required to wear uniforms, but all will be expected to maintain a high standard of personal presentation.

Education and training/entrance requirements

To become a real estate representative you usually need to complete an accredited short course in sales representative registration.

Short courses in Real Estate Sales Representative Registration and Sales Representative Registration are offered at TAFE Colleges and other registered training organisations throughout Australia.



Employment Opportunities

Real estate salespersons may be employed or specialise in areas such as residential, commercial and business sales. Employment opportunities for this occupation vary depending on the state of the real estate industry. The property market is very sensitive to the general state of the economy and factors such as government policy and interest rates.

Did You Know?

Land Grants in the Colony of NSW....


Governor Phillip, in his Instructions dated 25 April 1787, was empowered to grant land to emancipists.

Each male was entitled to 30 acres, an additional 20 acres if married, and 10 acres for each child with him in the settlement at the time of the grant (Historical Records of Australia 1.1.14).

To encourage free settlers to the colony, Phillip received additional Instructions dated 20 August 1789 (HRA 1.1.124-8) entitling non-commissioned Marine Officers to 100 acres and privates to 50 acres over and above the quantity allowed to convicts. Other settlers coming to the colony were also to be given grants.

Land grants issued during the Rum Rebellion 1808-09 were cancelled by Governor Macquarie but those which had been granted to "very deserving and Meritorious Persons" he later renewed (HRA 1.7.268).

Real Estate Agent
Governor Macquarie

In 1825 the sale of land by private tender began (Instructions to Governor Brisbane, 17 July 1825, HRA 1.12.107-125). There were still to be grants without purchase but they were not to exceed 2,560 acres or be less than 320 acres unless in the immediate vicinity of a town or village.

The Instructions required the Governor to arrange for a new Survey of the colony and the division of the settled districts into Counties, Hundreds and Parishes.

The unoccupied lands were then to be valued and eventually sold by tender, if not otherwise reserved, at not less than the average value for that parish. This scheme was slow in being implemented (HRA 1.16.274).

In a despatch dated 9 January 1831, Viscount Goderich instructed that no more free grants (except those already promised) be given.

All land was thenceforth to be sold at public auction (HRA 1.16.22). Likewise the practice of granting land as "marriage portions" to the children of colonists was discontinued (HRA 1.16.353, 793).

The new regulations were notified in a Government Notice of 1 July 1831 and published in a Government Order dated 1 August 1831.
(Source: NSW State Records)

 

Real Estate Agency Principal
Community and Health

Service or PersuadingClerical or OrganisingSkill Level 3Skill Level 4Skill Level 5

Real Estate Agency Principals manage the overall activities of real estate agencies. The principal agent or officer in effective control is responsible for ensuring that appropriately qualified people work in an agency. This is a key aspect of managing an estate agency office. Future Growth Strong

An agency can only employ estate agents and agents’ representatives to carry out the estate agency work of:

buying, selling and leasing properties or businesses
negotiating
collecting rent.

Before they can start work, each employee must receive written authority from the principal agent or officer in effective control, setting out the functions they can perform.

ANZSCO ID: 612113


Knowledge, skills and attributes

  • ability to communicate with and relate to a range of people from diverse social, economic and cultural backgrounds and with varying physical and mental abilities

  •  analytical skills to interpret documents such as legislation, regulations, employment contracts and licensing requirements

  •  application of risk management strategies associated with advising clients on property sales and property management options

  •  computing skills to access agency and resource databases, use standard software packages, send and receive emails, access the internet and web pages, and complete and lodge standard documents online

  •  decision making and problem solving skills to analyse situations and make decisions consistent with legislative and ethical requirements

  •  literacy skills to access and interpret a variety of texts, including legislation, regulations and rules of ethics; prepare general information and papers; prepare formal and informal letters, reports and applications; and complete standard forms

  •  negotiation skills to assist clients with property sales and property management matters

  •  numeracy skills to calculate and interpret data, such as commissions and entitlements

  •  planning, organising and scheduling skills to undertake work-related tasks such as inspecting properties

  •  research skills to identify and locate documents and information relating to real estate operations

  •  self-management skills to organise own work, deliver quality customer service and effectively manage competing demands

  •  teamwork skills to work effectively in and promote communication between sales, property management and administrative teams in an agency environment  

Real Estate Agency Principal
(Source: Connect Skills Institute)

Duties and Tasks

  • Accepts and lists properties and businesses for sale and lease, conducts inspections, and advises buyers on the merits of properties and businesses and the terms of sale or lease.
  • Advises vendors of sales and marketing options such as sale by auction and open house inspections.
  • Catalogues and details land, buildings and businesses for sale or lease and arranges advertising.
  • Assesses buyers' needs and locates properties and businesses for their consideration.
  • Offers valuations and advice for buying and selling properties and businesses, and structures the terms of settlement.
  • Collects and holds rent monies from tenants, and remits to owner on agreed basis.
  • Monitors and addresses non-compliance with terms and conditions of tenancy and pursues rental arrears.
  • Develops and implements business plans, budgets, policies and procedures for the agency.
  • May arrange finance, land brokerage, conveyancing and maintenance of premises.


  
Education and training/entrance requirements

You usually need a certificate IV in real estate practice or property services to work as a Real Estate Agency Principal. Some Real Estate Agency Principals have university qualifications in related areas such as business and management.


Did You Know?

John McGrath is an Australian entrepreneur in the real estate industry. McGrath is the founder of McGrath Estate Agents, a real estate company in Australia. The company was listed on the ASX beginning in 2015, with McGrath retaining 27% share of the company. It has been considered one of Australia's largest real estate networks. (Source: Wikipedia)


John McGrath

He failed final exams but has built a real estate fortune....

John McGrath: Life After Exams
https://youtu.be/5JjtpxODDRc



 

Property Developer
Community and Health

Service or PersuadingClerical or OrganisingSkill Level 1Skill Level 2Skill Level 3
Skill Level 4Skill Level 5

Property developers research land and property opportunities and evaluate the feasibility of a project. They work out the best use for the land or property. They then plan the property development, including the schedule and costs. They may need to work with architects, builders, and local councils. As the development progresses they will visit construction sites and direct various activities. Future Growth Strong

Identify opportunities to purchase land and properties, enhance them and increase their resale value. Property Developers may purchase vacant blocks of land to build new dwellings in order to rent or sell them, and they may also subdivide sites.

Property development can be a risky undertaking because developers usually finance projects themselves, so they need to highly confident, organised and skilled in all aspects of development.


ANZSCO description: Property developers organise and plan for the acquisition, development and subsequent sale of new and existing properties.

Alternative names: Land Economist, Real Estate Developers

Knowledge, skills and attributes

Property Developers need to be organised, methodical and excellent planners in order to coordinate all the aspects of the development process. They need to possess vision and great intuition to be able to spot investment and development opportunities that others might not see. A Property Developer needs excellent research and negotiation skills as well as the ability to communicate with all types of people. They must be great problem-solvers, have sound judgement and be decisive when faced with choices. A great Property Developer needs to understand risk but not be afraid to take chances where necessary. They must be great with money, and able to inspire and motivate those who work on their projects in order to get the best value for their investment.

A property developer needs:

  • good leadership skills
  • to be able to work without supervision
  • to enjoy problem solving
  • good communication and negotiation skills
  • an aptitude for mathematics
  • thorough research, judgement and analytical skills
  • vision and intuition
  • leadership and management skills
  • planning and project management skills
  • salesmanship.
  • neat appearance.

Visualising development
(Source: PropertyDevelopmentz)

Duties and Tasks

  • Explore and identify land and property opportunities and determine the most profitable use of properties.

  • Purchase properties and liaise with architects, builders and councils regarding design and planning permits.

  • Oversee and monitor work being undertaken, and manage the sale or lease of completed properties.

  • Researching and identifying development opportunities.

  • Negotiating purchase of land and property.

  • Developing designs, budgets and schedules for the project.

  • Obtaining planning permits and permissions.

  • Generating or supplying finance.

  • Monitoring and maintaining work schedule and quality control.

  • Managing the sale or leasing of completed properties.

 

Working conditions

Property developers work in an office and also outdoors on building sites. They may be required to do a lot of travelling between locations.

Property Developer at work 
(Source: CareerFAQs)


Tools and technologies

Property developers may need to be adept in using various software for project control or to keep in contact with other people on the project.


Education and training/entrance requirements

You can work as a property developer without any formal qualifications and get training on the job. However, entry into this occupation may be improved by obtaining a formal qualification and experience related to the building industry.

You can also complete a degree with a major in property development and valuation.

You may also improve your prospects in the industry if you have completed a formal qualification in commerce or a related area.

Did You Know?

Property Developer

The Seven Different Types of Property Developers

1. THE BACK OF THE UTE DEVELOPER

2. THE EXTENDED FAMILY DEVELOPER

3. THE PHOENIX DEVELOPER

4. THE $1,000 OPTION FEE DEVELOPER

5. THE SECOND GENERATION DEVELOPER

6. THE “KNOW IT ALL” DEVELOPER

7. THE CAUTIOUS DEVELOPER


In summary, our experience has indicated that the most successful property developments are those who:

•Have a robust risk management plan

•Have employed the relevant experts to undertake specialist reports where necessary

•Have put a sound marketing plan in place

•Have properly researched the market, price point and location of their product

•Are experienced and knowledgeable in what they are doing

•Have engaged a reputable builder with sound financials and a strong track record

(Source: HoldenCapital)




Property Manager
Community and Health

Service or PersuadingSkill Level 1Skill Level 2Skill Level 3

 
A real estate property manager manages rental properties on behalf of the owners by, drawing up leases, handling finances and maintenance, advertising vacant premises, arranging property Future Growth Strong inspections, and choosing suitable tenants in consultation with the property owner.

Property managers act as the intermediary between tenants and property owners in rental agreements. They are responsible for showing prospective tenants through the property and at the same time assessing their suitability on behalf of the owner. Once tenants have moved in, the property manager is responsible for collecting rent, carrying out regular inspections to ensure the property is being maintained and organising any necessary repairs on behalf of the owner. Property managers must also develop a property condition report to be used as a record in cases where repairs are necessary and the costs are taken from a tenant's bond and as evidence of the condition of the property when tenants move in.


ANZSCO ID & description: 612112: Supervises the leasing of rental properties on behalf of owners. Registration or licensing may be required.

Alternative names: Lease Administrator

Specialisations: Body Corporate Manager, Strata Managing Agent

Knowledge, skills and attributes

A property manager needs:

  • highly developed organisational skills
  • good communication, negotiation skills and interpersonal skills
  • to pay attention to detail
  • a sense of honesty and integrity
  • to maintain a neat, tidy appearance and a pleasant manner
  • able to work independently
  • good working knowledge of the local area

Property Manager
(Source: The Balance)

 

Duties and Tasks
Property managers may perform the following tasks:

  • market vacant properties for lease and organise viewing sessions for prospective tenants
  • perform background checks of references, employment and rentals before selecting suitable tenants
  • negotiate lease terms and conditions and ensure that they are observed
  • collect and hold bond and rent monies from tenants
  • manage other accounts and finances such as insurance and budget requirements
  • arrange and perform regular property inspections
  • monitor property condition and arrange for maintenance or repair
  • advise on market rents and conduct rent reviews to assess the current rental price
  • represent property owners at residential tribunal hearings.

Working conditions

Property managers generally have a central office, but may spend a large part of their day visiting properties to conduct inspections and viewings. They generally look after numerous properties, and so can be very busy, requiring a well developed organisational system to manage appointments and property specific records. They often work regular hours, however some weekend and evening work may be required to show properties or deal with emergencies.

Property managers have a high level of contact with people, including property owners, tenants, tradespeople, council representatives and real estate agents.
Property managers often work irregular hours, including weekends. This occupation involves a great deal of contact with the public and with associated professionals, such as builders, plumbers and electricians.

Tools and technologies

Property managers often use computers, diaries and mobile phones to manage their workload and keep track of appointments. When producing property reports, or advertising new properties for lease, they will often use digital cameras to photograph the condition of the property, noting any pre-existing damage. Paperwork also plays an important role in a property manager's work, including legally binding lease agreements, property reports and financial transaction records. Most property managers use a car to travel between properties.
 
Education and training/entrance requirements

To become a property manager you usually need to complete an accredited short course in property management or property managers registration.

Short courses in Property Management Registration and Property Managers Registration are offered at TAFE Colleges and other registered training organisations throughout Australia.

You can also complete a traineeship. The property manager traineeship usually takes 24 months to complete.

Employment Opportunities

Employment of property or real estate managers is projected to grow faster than the average for all occupations.

Opportunities are expected to grow in the residential real estate sector along with the strong property market, the growth in apartment living, and as the population continues to increase. There are likely to be more jobs available in larger cities and population areas.

Opportunities in commercial and industrial property management are also expected to be strong, although these jobs may be more susceptible to changes in the economy and the real estate market than roles in residential property management.

 


Caretaker
Community and Health

Service or PersuadingPractical or mechanicalClerical or OrganisingSkill Level 1

Caretakers are the overseers of apartment buildings, schools, camps, offices, caravan parks and other areas which have community access. They ensure and maintain the cleanliness and safety of the common areas and act on behalf of the property owners and landlords in many ways. Future Growth Static

Caretakers often provide maintenance and repair services inside of rental units as well as maintain the grounds.

Caretakers help maintain a company's building and/or grounds, ensuring a safe, clean, and pleasing environment for workers and clients. They perform a variety of tasks, such as removing trash, performing seasonal maintenance, gardening, and handling "touch-ups" to property. The caretaker is often also responsible for maintaining proper inventory levels for needed supplies, ensuring they are replenished as needed. They typically operate a variety of tools, equipment, and vehicles to help maintain properties. In all tasks, caretakers must adhere to relevant company standards and procedures. The physical demands of this position vary, but lifting and moving objects of a variety of sizes may be required in the course of the day. Depending on the position, the caretaker may be exposed to different weather conditions, which may mean working in extreme heat, cold, and other inclement weather. Standing and moving for long periods of time are often needed.

ANZSCO ID: 8991

Specialisations: Janitor (on a separate page within this website)

Knowledge, skills and attributes

  • Ability to lift heavy objects
  • Ability to stand and walk for long periods of time
  • Analytical thinking skills
  • Capable of performing minor repairs
  • Good communication skills
  • Good maths skills
  • Good time management skills
  • Impeccable attention to detail
  • Maintaining decorum in tense situations
  • Clean common areas, parking lots, gardens and lawns
  • Collect rental payments and providing tenants with receipts
  • Ensure building and facility is secure
  • Get authorization for major repairs and hiring contractors
  • Handle minor repairs

Caretaker
(Source: Freepik)

Duties and Tasks

  • Clean common areas, parking lots, gardens and lawns
  • Collect rental payments and providing tenants with receipts
  • Ensure building and facility is secure
  • Get authorization for major repairs and hiring contractors
  • Handle minor repairs
  • Inspect fire extinguishers and stairwells
  • Issue copies of rules
  • Maintain lighting fixtures
  • Maintain peace and order
  • Take applications from potential tenants
  • Seal, wax, and buff floors and hard surfaces
  • Assist painters and security engineers when assigned
  • Clean pathways, including sweeping and raking leaves
  • Clean individual units when vacated or requested
  • Sweep, mop, wash, dust and vacuum designated areas
  • Caution tenants regarding excessive noise, disorderly conduct and abuse of property
  • Patrol buildings to ensure security is maintained
  • Purchase cleaning supplies


Working conditions

Caretakers perform some of their duties in the comfort of climate controlled offices, but most tasks are completed outdoors. It can be hard work as maintaining the grounds can prove to be heavy work. Most tenants readily pay their rent on time but dealing with tenants who are late can be stressful, especially if eviction is necessary.

Education and training/entrance requirements

A Year 10 Certificate, Certificate I, or a short period of on-the-job training is sometimes needed, but is not necessary to work in this job.

Employment Opportunities

Overall employment of caretakers is projected to grow about as fast as the average for all occupations. Employment growth coupled with high job turnover should result in good job opportunities for candidates for these positions.

 

 

Strata Managing Agent
Community and Health

Practical or MechanicalClerical or OrganisingSkill Level 2Skill Level 3

Strata managers deal with the management, including financial and clerical matters, of their strata development. Future Growth Strong

Specialisations: Principal (Strata Management Agency) A principal (strata management agency) manages the activities of other strata managing agents within an organisation.

Knowledge, skills and attributes  


To become a strata manager, you would need:

  • good people skills

  • a pleasant manner and neat personal appearance

  • an ability to negotiate and mediate

  • good organisational and planning skills

  • accounting, budgeting and IT skills

  • good written and oral communication skills.

Strata Managing Agent
(Source: Good Universities Guide)

Duties and Tasks

As a strata manager you would:

  • carry out duties and responsibilites as stipluated by a stata scheme and outlined in a management agreement

  • work with the building manager on arranging and and overseeing maintenance, upkeep and repair of common property in a strata scheme

  • pay invoices for works carried out by contractors

  • control finances and accounts on behalf of those paying strata levies

  • provide financial records for all strata plan members to access

  • prepare and distribute meeting notices, agendas and minutes

  • organise and conduct strata meetings, including the annual general meeting (AGM)

  • provide guidance and expert advice on taxation and legislative matters

  • ensure appropriate insurances are in place and up-to-date for the strata scheme

  • take instructions from the Executive Committee of the strata scheme.


Working conditions
 
As a strata manager, you would be expected to work irregular hours, including evening and weekends. You may also be on-call for emergencies.

You might work for a strata management company, property management company, or be self-employed. You would work in a office, and would travel to strata buildings to attend meetings and deal with resident's issues. You may need to travel between strata schemes if you manage more than one.

Education and training/entrance requirements


To become a strata manager you usually have to complete a VET qualification in property services (operations/real estate) or a short course in strata management.

You may also become a strata manager through a traineeship in Property Services (Operations) or Property Services (Real Estate). Generally, employers require a junior secondary school certificate or equivalent.

Strata managers are required to be licensed in some States. To obtain a licence, you would need a undergo National Police Check and to meet training requirements, including detailed knowledge of the Strata Schemes Management Act and other relevant laws.

Employment prospects for strata managers are expected to grow strongly.

The continued growth of apartment blocks, retirement villages and multi-unit housing operating under strata schemes has increased demand for strata management services.

 

Drone Real Estate Photographer
Community and Health

Real Estate photography is a growing lucrative market with many sellers and agents looking outside the box for a different perspective to help sell the property. With the introduction of drones, top shot shots of the land size and property has become a highly wanted shot as it allows the agent to demonstrate the size of the property from a helicopter perspective. Drones have changed the way photos are taken and agents/photographers require high-quality, sage and intelligent drones.

A photographer for a real estate team will shoot photography and videography needed for a home starting from pre-production including lighting the house to post-production including editing the imagery to put in the listing. Real Estate photographers have an eye for good composition as well as empathetic communication skills with talent and staff. They work hand in hand with senior team members and shooters to conceptualize, storyboard, organize and capture footage for various initiatives to help sell a home. More often now, real estate photographers will use a drone to take photographs of the surrounding area - the top of the roof and any mapping of area as well as to produce a video inside a property.

Real estate photography is a genre of photography that, while specific and marketable, can still be creative and economically rewarding. They work with realtors who use the photos to sell properties online. Real estate photographers may also take photographs for model home builders, designers, home decorators or architects. Sometimes a photographer may choose to work with an assistant who helps with equipment and editing.

A Real Estate Photographer has to produce photos and videos for both residential and commercial clients. Photography is at the heart of a successful real estate company for many reasons, but the most important reason is to help the Real Estate company stand out. In the age of social media and mobile devices, having the best pictures and videos can make all the difference.

ANZSCO ID: 2113

Knowledge, skills and attributes

  • Have a strong real estate portfolio

  • Be available for multiple shoots a week

  • The ability to prioritize multiple tasks, follow detailed instructions, and balance multiple deadlines

  • Have a comprehensive knowledge of photography, lenses, lighting, video equipment and a drone

  • Be familiar with Adobe Photoshop and Adobe Creative Suite - being able to edit

  • Scheduling: Photographers collaborate with clients about convenient times to photograph properties.

  • Computer skills: Creating and marketing your portfolio and editing photographs requires an extensive understanding of computers and relevant software.

  • Communication: Good speaking, listening and writing skills are important for networking with potential clients.

  • Time management: Real estate photography often involves meeting deadlines in a short amount of time. Photographers are responsible for managing the time spent photographing a property, editing photos and communicating with clients.

  • Business management: Working as a real estate photographer is like running a business. Photographers often need to market themselves, find clients and handle their finances.

House and Drone
(Source: BoxBrownie)


Duties and Tasks

Real estate photography is more than showing up to a property and taking photos. Real estate photographers handle the pre-production and the post-production of their photos. It is their responsibility to produce flattering property photos, and that work may include pre-photo decoration and post-photo enhancement and editing.

  • Photograph homes listed for sale to meet the online marketing and print needs of Realtors and their Brokerage firm

  • Staging houses, offices and other properties for photos

  • Planning a shot list of images to take

  • Photographing interior and exterior of property buildings - using the drone for some or most of these shoots

  • Meet brokers/clients on site and perform photo session

  • Label and upload images to the in-house studio, the same day of the shoot

  • Take photo shoots of interior space of residences – common room, living room, bedrooms, bathrooms, kitchen, etc., and show the flow of the space

  • Ensure good photo composition, angles and positioning of the space taken

  • Editing and manipulating photos for lighting, contrast, and watermarks

  • Video real estate properties - can use a drone for this purpose

  • Edit videos for web content with navigation structures and text/graphic overlays

  • Help homeowners stage their homes to achieve the best visual results

  • Positioning lighting as needed

  • Preparing equipment for sessions, including charging batteries, packing camera bag and clearing SD card

  • Maintaining camera, lighting equipment and the drone, which involves routine cleaning, bulb replacements and recharging the drone

  • Editing photographs

  • Building a portfolio

  • Networking with realtors and other potential clients

Aerial
(Source: BoxBrownie)


Working conditions

Most of the shoots are scheduled Monday – Friday between 9 and 5 but you must be available if needed on weekends.


Tools and technologies

Photographers need to buy their own equipment including the drone - these are not cheap. You might work your way up by purchasing cameras, lens, tripods, a softbox and flash. Drone technology is changing each day and as a result drones are getting cheaper.

Selecting the right drone for real estate photography comes with understanding your individual needs and how the drones capabilities meet or exceed those needs. You need to investigate:

  • Camera performance

  • Flight performance

  • Flight Safety

  • Transmission

Intelligent Flight Modes - Intelligent flight modes offer new pilots and seasoned professionals the ability to create sunning videos of the property and surrounding areas. You can use POI, point of interest, to create a unique circle around the property where you can set the height and gimbal tilt to create an immersive video of the property and its surrounding location.

Aerial Reveal - Simply fly over the property and reveal the surrounding area to give a great introduction or conclusion to your video. You can adjust the gimbal pitch and smoothness whilst flying to add an additional dynamic element.

Camera Angles - When shooting just above ground level, it is essential to show the property where it looks the best and with a drone, you have the greatest flexibility where you can spent time to frame the shot perfectly, tilt the gimbal down and get the shot. If you have extra space to fly around in, it will make your creative process easier.

Lighting Conditions - The best time to film or take photos is during golden hour where you get beautiful shades of orange/pink/blue running through the sky and the property looks soft without any harsh shadows. However, you can still shoot during mid day sun or on cloudy days. You will need to make sure you have the appropriate sensor for your lighting conditions.

 

Photographs may need adjustments and enhancements. Editing software allows you to crop, add light or exposure and sharpen your images. Learning how to edit photos can give your work a professional look, so mastering this type of software is crucial to getting and pleasing clients. Your editing proficiency level also determines the time post-processing takes. In real estate photography, clients often expect a quick turnaround time.

Sydney waterside property
Sydney waterside property - Drone photography
(Source: High Exposure)


Education and training/entrance requirements

Becoming a real estate photographer does not require a degree if you already have technical skills and natural talent. Some photographers are self-taught, and you can develop and improve your skills through practice. However, you can develop the skills you need by completing a degree in Photography especially the latest skills in using a drone.

When you have developed your style, share your work with friends to get feedback. After you feel confident in your practice, offer to take free photographs for a local realtor or contractor. They get free marketing photographs, and you can develop skills and experience, build your portfolio and develop a relationship with a potential client. Practicing with your gear can also help you develop a routine, which can make you a more efficient photographer.


Employment Opportunities

Real Estate is a growing industry. To break into this industry you need to create a portfolio. A portfolio represents your best work and demonstrates your skills to potential clients. When you photograph a property, preserve your rights to the images so that you can feature them in your portfolio. Creating an online portfolio is a great way to make your work accessible. Online portfolios are often free and easy to build, with customizable templates and creative designs.

Begin building your client base by marketing your portfolio to any company that may require your service. Whenever you finish a job, ask the client for a reference so that you can have a strong verification of your skills to include with your portfolio.

When starting a client base, some real estate photographers offer an initial photographing service for free or at a discounted rate. This helps build trust with a client and adds professional work to your portfolio. Pricing your work can depend on the value of the property and your work experience.

 

 

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Materials sourced from
the Job Guide;
Jobs & Skills WA [Property Manager; Real Estate Agent; Property Developer];
Good Universities Guide [Strata Managing Agent; ]
Open University [Caretaker];
Payscale [Caretaker]
Consumer Affairs Victoria [Principal Agent; ]
CareerFAQs[ How to become a Property Developer; ]
CareersOnline [Real Estate Salesperson; ]
CareerHQ [Strata Manager; Real Estate Agent; Caretaker; ]
Seek [Property Developer; ]
Wizehire [Real Estate Photographer; ]
Indeed [How to become a Real Estate Photographer; ]

DJ1 [Drones for Real Estate; ]
Training.gov.au [Training Components; ]

JobOutlook [Caretaker
; Real Estate Agents; ]

 

 

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Midwife

Early Childhood Educator

Social Worker

Special Care Worker

Chiropractor

Medical Practitioner

Ophthalmologist

Audiologist

Podiatrist

Medical Imaging Technologist

Speech Pathologist

Occupational Therapist

Natural Therapist

SES Officer

Art Therapist

Dermatologist

Psychiatrist

Plastic or Reconstructive Surgeon

acupuncturist

Osteopath

Paediatrician

Neurologist

Indigenous Community Worker

Oncologist

Sports Doctor

Retirement Nursing Home Manager

Cardiologist

House Parent

Rheumatologist

Community Worker

Youth Worker

Anaesthetist

Intensive Care Specialist

Surgeon

Medical Radiation Therapist

Vet

Firefighter

Garbage Collector

Midwife

Paramedic

Teacher

Dentist

physio

Optometrist

Chaplain

Nurse

Child Care Worker

Social Worker

Real Estate Agent

Special Care Worker

Chiropractor

Medical Practitioner

Ophthalmologist

Audiologist

Podiatrist

Medical Imaging Technologist

Speech Pathologist

Occupational Therapist

Natural Therapist

SES Officer

Art Therapist

Dermatologist

Psychiatrist

Plastic or Reconstructive Surgeon

acupuncturist

Osteopath

Paediatrician

Neurologist

Indigenous Community Worker

Oncologist

Sports Doctor

Retirement Nursing Home Manager

Cardiologist

House Parent

Rheumatologist

Community Worker

Youth Worker

Anaesthetist

Intensive Care Specialist

Surgeon

Medical Radiation Therapist

Vet

Firefighter

Garbage Collector

Midwife

Paramedic

Teacher

Dentist

physio

Optometrist

Chaplain

Nurse

Child Care Worker

Social Worker

Real Estate Agent

physio

Optometrist

Special Care Worker

Medical Practitioner

Chiropractor

Ophthalmologist

Audiologist

Podiatrist

Medical Imaging Technologist

&  Speech Pathologist

Occupational Therapist

Natural Therapist

SES Officer

Art Therapist

Dermatologist

Psychiatrist

Plastic or Reconstructive Surgeon

acupuncturist

Osteopath

Paediatrician

Neurologist

Indigenous Community Worker

Oncologist

Sports Doctor

Retirement Nursing Home Manager

Cardiologist

House Parent

Rheumatologist

Community Worker

Youth Worker

Anaesthetist

Intensive Care Specialist

Surgeon

Medical Radiation Therapist

Vet

Firefighter

Garbage Collector

Midwife

Paramedic

Teacher

Dentist

physio

Optometrist

Chaplain

Nurse

Child Care Worker

Social Worker

Real Estate Agent

physio

Optometrist

Special Care Worker

Medical Practitioner

Chiropractor

Ophthalmologist

Audiologist

Podiatrist

Medical Imaging Technologist

  Speech Pathologist

Occupational Therapist

Natural Therapist

SES Officer

Art Therapist

Dermatologist