Oncologist

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Medical Oncologist
Radiation Oncologist
Surgical Oncologist
Oncology Nurse


 

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Helping or advisingAnalytic or ScientificSkill Level 6

Overview

Oncology is the study of cancer. An oncologist is a doctor who treats cancer and provides medical care for a person diagnosed with cancer. Oncologists are physicians who manage patients with cancer.

Cancer is a term for diseases in which abnormal cells divide without control and can invade nearby tissues. Cancer cells can spread to other parts of the body through the blood and lymph systems. Future Growth Strong
  
Oncologists diagnose and assess stages of cancer, recommend and
implement appropriate treatment plans and continually monitor progress.

ANZSCO ID & description:
253314: Investigates, diagnoses and treats patients with cancer using chemotherapy and biological therapy. Registration or licensing is required.

Alternative names:
Clinical Oncologist,
Cancer Specialist.

Specialisations:

The field of oncology has 3 major areas based on treatments: medical oncology, radiation oncology, and surgical oncology.

Medical oncologists treat cancer using medication, including chemotherapy, immunotherapy, and targeted therapy.

Radiation oncologists treat cancer using radiation therapy, which is the use of high-energy x-rays or other particles to destroy cancer cells.

Surgical oncologists treat cancer using surgery, including removing the tumor and nearby tissue during a operation. This type of surgeon can also perform certain types of biopsies to help diagnose cancer.

 

There are also medical terms for oncologists who specialize in caring for specific groups of patients or groups of cancers. Here are definitions for some common terms:

  • Gynaecological oncologists treat cancers in such reproductive organs as the cervix, fallopian tubes, ovaries, uterus, vagina, and vulva.
       
  • Geriatric oncologists work with people with cancer who are age 65 and older. Older adults can have additional challenges. Geriatric oncologists specialize in providing the best care for older adults.
      
  • Haematologist oncologists: treat blood cancers, such as leukemia, lymphoma, and myeloma.(on another page within this site - under Haematologist)
     
  • Paediatric oncologists treat cancer in children and teens. Some types of cancer occur most often in these younger age groups. When these types of cancer occasionally occur in adults, those adult patients may choose to work with a pediatric oncologist.
      
  • Neuro-oncologists treat cancers of the brain, spine, and nervous system.
      
  • Thoracic oncologists treat cancers inside the chest area, including the lungs and esophagus.
      
  • Urologic oncologists treat cancers in the genitourinary system, such as the bladder, kidneys, penis, prostate gland, and testicles.

Introduction to Oncology (Cancer Basics FOR BEGINNERS)
https://youtu.be/TOvs678W_TU?si=ltmMzjukYNcrYiHP

 

 

Knowledge, skills and attributes

An oncologist needs:

  • high levels of intelligence and self discipline
  • expert knowledge in the areas of chemotherapy, radiation therapy, hormone therapy, immunotherapy and targeted treatments
  • to be able to make good clinical judgements under difficult and emotional circumstances
  • to be able to effectively counsel and advise patients
  • to work as part of a multidisciplinary team and in some cases, manage that team
  • a willingness to continue to engage in professional development, study and training
  • excellent communication skills
  • to be able to work under pressure
  • sensitivity, understanding and to be trustworthy

Oncologist with patient
(Source: Health Care Workers Salary)

Duties and Tasks

An oncologist manages a patient's care throughout the course of the disease. This starts with the diagnosis. Their role includes:

  • Recommending tests to determine whether a person has cancer
  • Explaining a cancer diagnosis, including the type and stage of the cancer
  • Talking about all treatment options and your treatment choice
  • Delivering quality and compassionate care
  • Helping you manage symptoms and side effects of cancer and its treatment

Working conditions

Most oncologists start their careers in hospitals and clinics, eventually moving into private practice. Oncologists usually work long hours and at times are on call.

Oncology work can be emotionally draining as a lot of time is spent dealing with patients who have a serious disease - frequent time-out is a must.

A person's cancer treatment plan may include more than one type of treatment, such as surgery, cancer medications, and/or radiation therapy. That means different types of oncologists and other health care providers work together to create a patient's overall treatment plan. This is called a multidisciplinary team.

Cancer care teams often include a variety of other health care professionals, including pathologists, radiologists, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, oncology nurses, social workers, pharmacists, and more. Doctors from other areas of medicine can also be part of this team. For example, a dermatologist, which is a specialist in skin problems, may help treat skin cancer.


Tools and technologies

Oncologists are expected to be familiar with a variety of medical equipment and instruments associated with chemotherapy, radiotherapy and other cancer treatment.


Education and training/entrance requirements

Oncologists must be registered through the Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency with the Medical Board of Australia.

Minimum qualifications
The minimum education requirement for an oncologist is Fellowship of the Royal Australasian College of Physicians.


Did You Know?

Oncologist and writer Dr Ranjana Srivastava shares what she wish she had known earlier about her career choice and the challenges it presented along the way.

Books by Ranjana: A Better Death: Conversations About the Art of Living and Dying Well and What it Takes to Be a Doctor

Listen to Ranjana (7mins 37secs) - Wednesday 29 July 2020

This Working Life

 

Medical Oncologist
Community and Health

Helping or advisingAnalytic or ScientificSkill Level 6

Medical oncologists treat cancer using medication, including chemotherapy, immunotherapy, and targeted therapy.Future Growth Strong

Medical oncologists specialize in treating and managing solid tumours through nonsurgical methods, such as biological therapy, chemotherapy, immunotherapy, and hormonal therapy. These professionals are often the primary cancer doctors in treating people.

They help patients manage side effects and coordinate cancer treatment plans. Medical oncologists may also follow up with patients after completing treatment.

ANZSCO ID: 253314
  

Alternative names: Medical Oncology Physician, Clinical Oncologist,
   

Knowledge, skills and attributes

  • A medical degree in oncology and the successful completion of a residency and fellowship in oncology.

  • Certification to practice oncology

  • A caring and compassionate nature when dealing with patients

  • A thorough and up-to-date working knowledge of cancers and cancer treatment options

  • Technical skills to operate medical equipment and tools related to cancer treatment

  • Strong communication, interpersonal, and leadership skills.

Medical Oncologist
(Source: Your Career)


Duties and Tasks

Medical Oncologists investigate, diagnose and treat patients with cancer using chemotherapy and biological therapy.

  • Examines patients to determine the nature and extent of problems after referral from general medical practitioners and other medical specialists, and undertakes laboratory tests and diagnostic procedures.

  • Analyses test results and other medical information to make diagnoses.

  • Prescribes and administers drugs, as well as remedial and therapeutic treatment and procedures.

  • Records medical information and data.

  • May admit or refer patients to hospitals.

  • May consult other medical specialists.


Working conditions

Most Medical Oncologists start their careers in hospitals and clinics, eventually moving into private practice. Oncologists usually work long hours and at times are on call.

Oncology work can be emotionally draining as a lot of time is spent dealing with patients who have a serious disease - frequent time-out is a must.


Tools and technologies

Medical Oncologists are expected to be familiar with a variety of medical equipment and instruments associated with chemotherapy, radiotherapy and other cancer treatment.


Education and training/entrance requirements

To become a medical oncologist, you must first become a qualified medical practitioner and then specialise in oncology.

To become a medical practitioner, you need to study a degree in medicine. Alternatively, you can study a degree in any discipline followed by a postgraduate degree in medicine.

To specialise in medical oncology, doctors can apply to the Royal Australasian College of Physicians (RACP) to undertake further training and ultimately receive fellowship.

To be eligible for this specialist training, on completion of your medical degree, you must work in the public hospital system for a minimum of two years (internship and residency).

To work as a medical oncologist in Australia, you will need to obtain registration from the Medical Board of Australia.

 



Radiation Oncologist
Community and Health

Helping or advisingAnalytic or ScientificSkill Level 5Skill Level 6

Radiation oncologists are medical specialists who use radiation therapy (also known as radiotherapy) to treat and manage cancer in patients. Future Growth Strong

ANZSCO ID & description: 253918: Provides medical care and management of patients with cancer and other medical conditions through the conduct and supervision of radiation treatment; and advice on the provision of palliative and other supportive care of patients with cancer. Registration or licensing is required.

Knowledge, skills and attributes

A radiation oncologist needs:

  • the ability to cope with the physical and psychological demands of the job
  • to be accurate and have an eye for detail
  • problem solving skills
  • understanding, patience and empathy
  • excellent communication skills to liaise with other physicians and provide clear information to patients
  • to be able to work well within a team

Radiation Oncologist
(Source: Siteman Cancer Centre)

 

Duties and Tasks

Radiation oncologists work with and assess patients with cancer and plan the course of best treatment for them. Radiation oncologists may remove the cancer, or where that is not possible,  alleviate pain to improve the quality of life of a patient. They determine and prescribe the most suitable dose of radiation using high energy X-rays, electron beams or gamma rays to treat their patient.

They are ultimately responsible for assessing individual patients, determining the best management plan, overseeing treatment and assessing progress. Radiation Oncologists may order tests and imaging, prescribe medications, and consult with other doctors involved with cancer treatment.

Working conditions

Radiation oncologists work for public and private hospitals. They may supervise and teach medical students and trainees. Radiation oncologists may also perform research and conduct clinical trials. They may be required to be on-call in case of an emergency.
Most radiation oncologists in Australia work in the metropolitan areas. They must wear personal protective equipment and adhere to strict safety requirements when performing procedures with radiation.


Tools and technologies

​Radiation oncologists work with radiation therapists and medical physicists to deliver radiation treatment with a radiation machine called a linear accelerator (linac). Radiation oncologists usually use external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) techniques, but may also use intraoperative radiotherapy, total body irradiation, or brachytherapy, where radiation is delivered inside the patient. They may be required to wear lead aprons or thyroid shields if they are performing a procedure near radiation.

Education and training/entrance requirements

To work as a radiation oncologist in Australia, you will need to obtain registration from the Medical Radiation Practice Board.

To become a radiation oncologist, you must first become a qualified medical doctor and then specialise in radiation oncology.

To become a medical practitioner, you need to study a degree in medicine. Alternatively, you can study a degree in any discipline followed by a postgraduate degree in medicine.

To specialise in radiation oncology, doctors must apply to the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists (RANZCR) to complete the Radiation Oncology Training Program.
To be eligible for this specialist training, on completion of your medical degree, you must work in the public hospital system for two years (internship and residency).

A Career in Radiation Oncology - Radiation Oncologist
https://youtu.be/yzYCDmaS7bU

 

 

 

Surgical Oncologist
Community and Health

 

Helping or advisingAnalytic or ScientificSkill Level 6

Surgical oncologists treat cancer using surgery, including removing the tumor and nearby tissue during a operation. This type of surgeon can also perform certain types of biopsies to help diagnose cancer. Surgery is one of the most common treatments for cancer. It’s used for a variety of reasons, including to determine a diagnosis and staging through biopsy, tumor removal or reduction (also called debulking) and palliative surgery to help relieve symptoms. Some patients have surgery alone, while others undergo surgery as part of an overall plan that may include radiation therapy, chemotherapy and other treatments.

A surgical oncologist, also, is a surgeon who is involved in cancer care through clinical practice, research, advocacy and education.

Surgical oncologists are general surgeons with specialty training in procedures for diagnosing, staging (determining the stage of cancer), or removing cancerous growths. The most common procedures performed by surgical oncologists are biopsies and surgery for cancerous growth removal. Future Growth Strong

They can also perform surgery to stage cancer and determine how far cancer has spread. In certain circumstances, surgical oncologists may also perform preventive surgeries. In some cases, surgery may be the only treatment you need. In other circumstances, you may have surgery and receive additional treatments such as chemotherapy or radiation. In these cases, a surgical oncologist may be an important part of the cancer care team.

Surgical oncologists may perform surgeries to treat different cancers, especially solid tumors and those contained to one area. Whether surgery is recommended depends on several factors, including the type of tumor, its location and its stage when diagnosed. Providers also consider the patient’s preferences for treatment, age and ability to tolerate surgery.

What Is Surgical Oncology?
https://youtu.be/U9hlg3kLOcs?si=X0jHd4YRksqDOq7s

 

ANZSCO ID: 2535
  
Knowledge, skills and attributes

A surgical oncologist should have:

  • a deep understanding of the epidemiology, pathophysiology, anatomy, diagnosis and treatment of the cancers they treat

  • an awareness of the knowledge, roles and skills of the other health professionals involved in cancer care

  • the highest level of technical skill to ensure the best possible outcomes

  • the communication skills to successfully relate to patients, colleagues, the community and health funders

  • the desire to innovate and research to improve cancer outcomes

  • the desire to improve themselves, the facilities and the systems through involvement in quality assurance and reflective practice.

 

Oncologist
(Source: UWA)


Duties and Tasks

Surgical oncologists are surgeons who devote most of their time to the study and treatment of malignant neoplastic disease. They must possess the necessary knowledge, skills, and clinical experience to perform both the standard as well as extraordinary surgical procedures required for patients with cancer.

Surgical oncologists must be able to diagnose tumors accurately and to differentiate aggressive neoplastic lesions from benign reactive processes. In addition, surgical oncologists should have a firm understanding of radiation oncology, medical oncology, and hematology.

They must also be capable of organizing interdisciplinary studies of cancer. Surgical oncologists should also be trained in pathology, because they will be called on to excise appropriate tumor samples for pathologists and make decisions about adequacy of surgical margins.

Surgical oncologists have a shared role with medical oncologists as the “primary care physicians” of cancer treatment. Almost all cancer patients will initially be managed by one of these two specialists who will bear the ultimate responsibility for coordinating appropriate multimodality care for the individual patient.

To diagnose cancers, surgical oncologists may perform biopsies. Biopsy procedures can include:

  • Needle biopsies such as fine needle aspiration or core biopsies

  • Excisional (removing an entire suspicious area, such as a mole or tumor)

  • Incisional (removing a portion of a suspicious area)

  • Laparotomy (abdominal surgery)

  • Endoscopic or laparoscopic (surgery using a scope)

  • Skin biopsy


Following a biopsy, a surgical oncologist will send tissue samples to a pathologist, who checks for cancer cells. If cancer is present, you may see the surgical oncologist again to have a tumor or other tissue removed. A surgical oncologist may also choose to perform a staging surgery to find out a tumor’s size and if cancer has spread.

Surgery can be an effective way to remove cancerous growths associated with skin, breast, liver, pancreatic, colon, or other types of cancers. When treating cancer, surgical oncologists may remove all or part of cancerous tumors, remove surrounding healthy tissue, or remove nearby lymph nodes. Surgical procedures used will vary based on the purpose of the surgery as well as the portions of the body and size of the tissue affected.

In summary, Surgical oncologists may remove:

  • Primary tumors

  • Lymph nodes around the tumor

  • Local or regional tumors that recur

  • Distant metastases

Surgical oncologists may perform open surgeries or minimally invasive procedures such as:

  • Laparoscopy

  • Laser surgery

  • Cryosurgery (freezing of skin and cells)

  • Hyperthermia (heating of tissue)

  • Microscopically controlled surgery

  • Endoscopy


Surgery
(Source: ABC News)

Working conditions

Surgical oncologists often work with medical oncologists, who may deliver chemotherapy if needed. In recent years, surgical oncologists have become more multidisciplinary and may offer treatments and procedures like advanced genomic testing, targeted therapy, neoadjuvant therapy and adjuvant therapy.

As a surgical oncologist, you’ll split your time between the operating room and a medical office. You may meet between 20 and 30 patients per day to discuss treatment options and conduct pre-operative appointments. You’ll also conduct follow-up appointments to discuss the results of the surgery and further treatment options.

Empathy, endurance and dedication are required for a surgical oncology career. You may perform a surgery that takes eight hours and you may have a surgery that takes 90 minutes. Both of these surgeries could occur on the same day. In between surgeries, you may return patient phone calls or do paperwork to document case notes and chart directions for patient care.

Outside of clinical and surgical work, a surgical oncologist often engages in research projects, academic writing for journals and the supervision of surgical oncology fellows. Ongoing continuing education is necessary to remain credentialed and stay current with new trends and methods of medical interventions.


Tools and technologies

Tools and Technologies
(Source: Cancer.gov)

Technologies and innovations like CRISPR, artificial intelligence, telehealth, the Infinium Assay, cryo-electron microscopy, and robotic surgery are helping accelerate progress against cancer.


Education and training/entrance requirements

Surgical oncologists are medical doctors or osteopathic medical doctors who have trained in surgery with a focus on cancer diagnosis and treatments.

Becoming a surgical oncologist involves several educational steps:

1. Obtain a medical degree
A medical degree is required if you wish to become an oncologist. Consider enrolling in a Bachelor of Medical Studies, Bachelor of Medicine/Bachelor of Surgery (MBBS) or studying a degree in any discipline followed by a postgraduate degree in medicine.

2. Apply for specialist training
After gaining the necessary experience, you can apply to the Royal Australasian College of Physicians (RACP) to undertake further training in surgical oncology.

3. Undergo specialised training
Once accepted into the RACP training program, you can begin your specialised training in surgical oncology. This training typically includes a combination of clinical rotations, research projects and educational activities to develop your expertise in the diagnosis and treatment of cancer.

4. Obtain RACP fellowship
Once you've successfully completed the training program and meet all the requirements, you may receive fellowship from the RACP. This fellowship signifies your achievement as a specialist surgical oncologist.

5. Secure registration
Practising as an oncologist requires registration with the Medical Board of Australia. The registration process involves submitting the necessary documentation, including your medical qualifications and evidence of specialist training in surgical oncology.

Some surgical oncologists choose to specialize in their field with additional research into specific cancers such as skin, gastrointestinal (stomach or intestine related), or gynecological. Surgical oncologist specialties can also be in specific age groups, such as pediatrics.


 

 

Oncology Nurse
Community and Health

Practical or MechanicalClerical or OrganisingHelping or advisingAnalytic or Scientific
Skill Level 5Skill Level 6

Oncology nurses are registered nurses with in-depth knowledge and experience in caring for cancer patients. The patients they care for may be babies or older patients experiencing many different forms of cancer. They work closely with oncologists, radiographers, pathologists, dieticians and physicians to support the care of their patients. Given the nature of the role and frequent contact with their patients, oncology nurses typically build solid relationships.Future Growth Strong

Many patients require regular appointments and long-term care. They can find comfort in their relationships with nurses, who they often see as patient advocates, working closely with patients to determine the right level of care. For example, they may liaise with the family and healthcare providers to determine the necessary steps, including ethical and legal considerations, to transition a cancer patient from curative to palliative care.

 

Oncology Nurse
(Source: Calvary Careers)

ANZSCO ID: 254499

Alternative names: Cancer Care Coordinator,


Knowledge, skills and attributes

Oncology nurses are responsible for interpreting pathology results and have an in-depth knowledge of the expected side effects of cancer treatments. It's important for an oncology nurse to have several skills to support their patients effectively, including:

  • Empathy: Looking after patients with cancer can mean helping people cope with fearful emotions. Demonstrating empathy when assisting patients and their families can help build and strengthen relationships. Patient care, particularly chemotherapy, can also challenge a patient's endurance. Showing that they understand these challenges with empathy is important in supporting and caring for patients. As an oncology nurse, putting yourself in the patient's situation and asking them questions can be a valuable way to improve your empathy skills.

  • Communication: Oncology nurses communicate with patients and their families about their care and treatment programs. Communication is critical for patient care, particularly when discussing patients' medication. Oncology nurses are responsible for ensuring patients and their families understand the specific drugs to take, including quantities and frequency.

    In addition to communicating processes and treatment plans in simple language, listening to patients is equally important. Patients often have many questions after a diagnosis. Being comfortable asking their oncology nurse these questions can help patients better understand how to cope with their diagnoses. Compassion and strong interpersonal skills are valuable skills for developing a career in oncology nursing.

  • Attention to detail: Oncology nurses are responsible for regularly monitoring patients and assessing their condition, making attention to detail essential. Noticing small changes in patients can help identify whether to stop or change their treatment. Identifying changes in a patient's condition may also mean recommending referrals to additional specialists.

  • Critical thinking: Oncology nurses treat various forms of cancer that affect different types of patients. Cancer and its treatment plans can affect patients differently and oncology nurses are responsible for swiftly responding to patients' needs. Critically assessing a situation to determine the right course of action for each scenario is an important skill to help with patient care.

  • Time management: Often, oncology nurses assist multiple patients, each with different treatment plans, so they learn to manage their time effectively to administer medications correctly. Being on time for patient appointments can also help demonstrate patient care and strengthen relationships. Planning, delegating and setting boundaries for patient care can all help improve your time management skills.

  • Emotional intelligence: An oncology nurse uses interpersonal skills to listen to patients and show sensitivity to their needs. Emotional intelligence means responding appropriately to patient behaviours and questions while assessing their understanding of the disease and their emotional state. This skill can help identify how best to communicate with a patient. For example, reading a person's reactions and understanding that they might not want full disclosure can help you determine the right approach for communicating with the patient.

Oncology Nurse with patient
(Source: Sanforth Health)


Duties and Tasks

An oncology nurse primarily focuses on being the main point of contact for their patients' ongoing care. Some oncology nurses may decide to switch to a clinical nurse specialist role. For example, they may educate and assess patients, conduct radiation therapy or specialise in gynaecology. In addition, oncology nurses may become involved in research and clinical trials.

  • making initial and ongoing patient assessments as patients proceed through their treatment plans

  • monitoring any side effects from patients' medication and treatment and referring them to oncologists for any severe or unusual issues for further assessment

  • analysing and interpreting test results

  • providing support and information to patients and their families in simple language to help them understand treatment options

  • explaining possible side effects and how to manage them to patients and their families

  • managing patient caseloads to ensure continuity of care

  • collaborating with the broader oncology team

  • creating specific care plans for patients, including referring to other healthcare professions where required

  • building a patient profile with each patient that considers their health history and information that's important for care providers to know

  • monitoring patients' physical and emotional status

  • assisting with clinical trials and other forms of research to help improve treatment processes

  • administering chemotherapy following guidelines and protocols

  • ordering medicines, supplies and chemotherapy

  • assisting patients with side effects and monitoring for any allergic reactions

  • managing, training and mentoring student nurses

  • attending training to maintain professional development

  • documenting all patient care to keep medical records updated

  • ensuring continuity of care within nursing teams and the broader oncology support team


Working conditions

Oncology nurses work in a variety of healthcare settings where patients seek treatment for cancer, including hospitals, community centres, private clinics or cancer centres. These specialised nurses support patients who have various types of cancer.

Oncology nurses most often work in clean and sterile hospital environments, although some may work in community-based clinics. Full time oncology nurses typically work a 40 hour week but needs to be available 24 hours a day, 7 days per week for emergencies. Since many medical facilities throughout Australia are understaffed due to the global nursing shortage, overtime has become standard practice with double shifts a frequent occurrence. Oncology nurses must also adhere to strict confidentiality policies due to the delicate health condition of cancer patients.


Tools and technologies

Digital health technology is of special interest to oncology nurses because monitoring and interventions for symptoms are the pillar of cancer care. Using digital health technology would allow for timely assessment and planning by the patient’s health care team. Managing symptoms effectively allows the patient to continue treatment and have good quality of life.

Oncology Nurse showing technology
(Source: Health Times)


Education and training/entrance requirements

If becoming an oncology nurse interests you, here are four steps to follow:

1. Complete an undergraduate degree: The first step to becoming an oncology nurse is completing registered nurse training, for example, a bachelor's degree in nursing. Courses specialising in nursing can provide knowledge and skills relating to anatomy, psychology and biology. A bachelor's degree typically takes three to four years of full-time study to complete.

2. Become a registered nurse: Once you graduate from a nationally accredited nursing program, you can apply to the Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency (AHPRA) to practice as a registered nurse. You can also apply if you're a final year nursing student or are within six weeks of completing your approved study program. Nurses who have an annual practising certificate (APC) with the Nursing Council of New Zealand can also apply. You may also be a recent graduate of an approved degree or a midwife with a current practising certificate.

3. Gain experience: Once you register as a nurse, you can begin working to gain practical experience. Registered nurses usually work in hospitals, private clinics, aged care or other community health settings. While you may start out in other specialities, you can look for opportunities or transfers to oncology departments once you have some experience. This can help you obtain professional experience within this specialisation area to determine if it's the right career move for you.

4. Further study: While employers don't always require you to complete further study, additional training can enhance your knowledge and skills to provide specialised care. For example, you may require additional training if you work in a specialist cancer centre. There are various available courses, including the Graduate Certificate in Cancer Nursing or the Graduate Diploma in Nursing Science (Oncology Nursing). Graduate diplomas typically take one year to complete, either full-time or part-time. Completing further study can also benefit you if you're considering working in clinical research, providing insights into future treatment trends and innovative technology advancements.


Employment Opportunities

There is a severe nursing shortage throughout Australia across all areas of nursing. This arises from the aging of the nursing workforce, nurse recidivism, and the smaller number of nurses entering the profession. This combined with the aging of the population and the increased incidence of cancer in older adults means that the field of oncology nursing is expected to grow faster than the average for all occupations

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Material sourced from
Jobs & Skills WA
[Medical Oncologist; Radiation Oncologist];
Targeting Cancer [Radiation Oncologist; ]
Indeed [Oncology Nurse; Medical Oncologist; ]
Oncology Nursing News [Digital Technology; ]
Health Times [Oncology Nursing; What does an Oncology Nurse do; ]
Cancer.net [Types of Oncologists; ]
Surgeons [Surgical Oncology; ]
National Center Biotechnology (USA) [Role of Surgical Oncology; ]
WebMD [Surgical Oncology; ]
Cancer Center [Surgical Oncology; ]
Work.Chron. [Surgical Oncology; ]
Labour Insights [Medical Oncologist; ]
Avinshospitals [Surgical Oncology; ]
UCLA [Oncology; ]

Your Career [Medical Oncologist; Radiation Oncologist; ]

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Real Estate Agent

physio

Optometrist

Special Care Worker

Medical Practitioner

Chiropractor

Ophthalmologist

Audiologist

Podiatrist

Medical Imaging Technologist

  Speech Pathologist

Occupational Therapist

Natural Therapist

SES Officer

Art Therapist

Dermatologist

Psychiatrist

Plastic or Reconstructive Surgeon

acupuncturist

Osteopath

Paediatrician

Neurologist

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