Midwife

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Midwifery Educator
Midwifery Manager
[under Nurse Manager]
Midwifery Researcher
Midwifery Unit Manager 
[under Nurse Manager]

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Helping or advisingAnalytic or ScientificSkill Level 5

Midwives provide care, education, advice and support to women and their families during pregnancy, labour and birth, and provide post-natal care into the early weeks following birth for Future Growth Very Strong women and babies.

Midwifery tasks include physical and technical care, assistance with newborn babies and ongoing monitoring, assessing and reporting of mother and child.

Midwife meaning 'with woman' is founded on respect for women and on a strong belief in the value of women's work of bearing and rearing each generation.

ANZSCO ID & description: 254111: Provides care and advice to women during pregnancy, labour and childbirth, and postnatal care for women and babies in a range of settings such as the home, community, hospitals, clinics and health units. Registration or licensing is required.

Alternative names: Certified Midwife, Registered Midwife

Specialisations: Community Midwife, Community Midwifery Specialist, Midwife Practitioner, Midwifery Educator, Midwifery Manager, Midwifery Researcher, Midwifery Unit Manager

Knowledge, skills and attributes
New born baby
A midwife needs:

  • a caring nature and enthusiasm for birthing

  • good communication skills

  • to assume responsibility and take leadership

  • to take initiative in emergencies

  • to be able to work under pressure

  • to provide speciality information and advice about pregnancy and birth

  • tolerance and patience and be able to interact with people from a wide range of backgrounds

  • to work as part of a team

  • to be mentally and physically fit

Duties and Tasks

Midwives may perform the following tasks:

  • provide clinical midwifery care and support for women, their babies and their families
  • detect any complications which may develop for a mother and/or her baby
  • arrange appropriate consultation and referral, and implement emergency measures when necessary work as a part of a multi-disciplinary team,
  • liaising with other healthcare professionals to provide the best care for childbearing women, their babies and families
  • observe, monitor, assess, report and document care provided to women and their babies, as well as their responses to treatment prescribe and administer medicines to women and their babies as required
  • prepare women for operative birth and provide post-operative care provide education and advice on health matters for women, their families and the wider community
  • answer questions and provide information to women and their families about treatment and care
  • contribute to the clinical training of medical, midwifery and other students
  • directly supervise other health professionals, such as enrolled nurses, registered nurses and health care assistants who may be included in the care of birthing women and their babies.


Listening

Working conditions

Midwives usually work according to a rotating 7-day roster which includes morning, afternoon and night shifts, weekends and public holidays. Alternatively, they may work in more flexible models of care that allow them to structure their working hours around the needs of the women they care for. They are often required to work on-call hours.

Registered midwives may work in public and private hospitals, community and home-based services including doctors' surgeries, community health centres, youth and women's shelters, and remote and rural areas.

Midwives are also employed in nursing agencies, international aid agencies and the Royal Flying Doctor Service. Many are self-employed and manage their own businesses, hours of work and caseloads.

Water birth

Tools and technologies

Midwives are skilled in the use of complex medical equipment including electronic foetal heart monitors, IV lines and equipment for resuscitation.


Education and training/entrance requirements

To become a midwife, you have to study midwifery at university. Alternatively, you can undertake a degree in nursing, followed by a postgraduate qualification in midwifery.


    Did You Know?

    In 2009, there were 295,700 births registered in Australia, resulting from 291,200 confinements. During the early 1900s, the number of births registered in Australia each year remained under 140,000, with a decline occurring in the early 1930s during the Great Depression. The number of births then increased rapidly, reaching a peak of 276,400 in 1971, falling sharply during the remainder of the 1970s, then increasing from the early 1980s to reach another peak in 1992 of 264,200 births.

    Following 1992, the annual number of birth registrations decreased, falling to 246,400 in 2001. The number of births then increased to a new record of 296,600 in 2008, the highest number of births registered within a calendar year in Australia. In 2009, the number of births registered declined slightly to 295,700 births.

    2.4 Births registered - 1909 to 2009
    Statistics for Births



    Sex ratio

    Just over half (51%) of all births registered in 2009 were male babies, resulting in a sex ratio at birth of 105.8 male births per 100 female births. The sex ratio for all births registered in Australia generally fluctuates at around 105.5 male births per 100 female births.

    (Source:
    Australian Bureau of Statistics)

 

Midwifery Educator
Community and Health

Analytic or ScientificSkill Level 5

A midwifery educator supports and teaches midwifery students, assists in the development, design, implementation and evaluation of midwifery education and professional development programs, and manages educational resources.

A midwifery educator is responsible for the design, planning, implementation and assessment of teaching and learning for nurses within hospitals and health care facilities. They make sure that Future Growth Very Strong nurses keep up to date with advances in nursing, and help nurses plan their continuing  professional development.

Midwifery educators coordinate and assess nurses’ clinical competencies
to ensure that nurses deliver safe and effective nursing care. They may also manage educational resources for nurses within the hospital or healthcare facility, and may undertake their own research.


ANZSCO ID & description: 254211: Designs, plans, implements and evaluates the delivery of nursing education and staff development programs, and manages educational resources.

Alternative names: Clinical Nurse Educator, Staff Development Nurse


Knowledge, skills and attributes

  • passion and commitment to nursing and teaching
  • advanced knowledge and experience in nursing
  • excellent communication skills to liaise with other professionals and provide clear information to students
  • good analytical and problem-solving skills
  • leadership and motivational abilities
  • organisational and time management skills

Duties and Tasks

  • researching, planning, developing and implementing nursing curricula New Born Baby
  • facilitating practical experience for general and specialist nurses
  • evaluating ongoing and changing educational needs and monitoring course outcomes
  • participating in developing and implementing policies affecting nursing, nurse education and health
  • undertaking and promoting nursing and interdisciplinary research projects, and disseminating research information
  • promoting utilisation of current research findings into clinical nursing practice and patient management
  • promoting the implementation of research and research findings into organisation-wide functions such as safety, quality and risk management
  • providing support and education for other nurses undertaking research

Working conditions

Midwifery educators may work in private or public hospitals, or other health service facilities to assist in nursing staff development or to organise clinical learning activities.

Midwifery educators usually work regular business hours, but may be required to work shift work when employed in hospitals.

 
Tools and technologies

Midwifery educators regularly use computers and office equipment, as well as educational resources.

Midwifery educators may use advanced patient simulation mannequins to imitate emergencies and demonstrate aspects of nursing care.

Education and training/entrance requirements

​To become a Midwifery educator you must first become a qualified registered nurse. You must also gain sufficient practical experience as a nurse, and usually need to complete postgraduate study in midwifery and education.

To work as a nurse in Australia, you must obtain professional registration with the Nursing and Midwifery Board of Australia, and hold a current Working with Children clearance issued by the Working with Children Screening Unit of the Department of Community Services.

 

Midwifery Researcher
Community and Health

Clerical or OrganisingAnalytic or ScientificSkill Level 5 Skill Level 6


A midwifery researcher conducts research into all aspects of midwifery care, professional issues affecting midwives and midwifery, maternity service provision and maternal and infant health Future Growth Very Strongpolicy.

ANZSCO ID: 254212

Knowledge, skills and attributes

  • Demonstrate a high standard of written and oral communication including conference presentations, writing manuscripts and preparation of grant applications.
  • Demonstrated high level interpersonal skills necessary for negotiating and liaising effectively with a diverse range of staff, patients and other stakeholders.
  •  Knowledge of data management systems
  •  Demonstrate an understanding and commitment to the NHMRC National Statement on Ethical conduct in research involving humans.
  •  Ability to conduct clinical research to ensure consistency and adherence to Good Clinical Practice (GCP)
  •  Possess analytical and problem solving skills
  •  Advanced computer skills
  • Evidence of strong clinical midwifery skills
  •  Ability to work independently and as part of a multidisciplinary team
  •  Project management skills


Midwifery Researchers
Professor Lex Doyle and A/Professor Jeanie Cheong from the
Centre for Research Excellence in Newborn Medicine has secured $2.5M grant.

(Source: The Royal Women's Hospital)

Duties and Tasks

  • Discover new knowledge
  • Support the implementation and evaluation of relevant, innovative clinical initiatives
  • Nurture novice researchers
  • Engage clinician nurses and midwives in research activities
  • Support nurses and midwives enrolled in higher degrees by research programmes
  • Pursue funds for research
  • Disseminate research findings at conferences and in professional journals
  • Provide methodological guidance for research design
  • Establish and maintain effective communication networks to facilitate efficient conduct of clinical research with relevant collaborators and/or industry sponsors within the relevant theme
  • Promote consumer awareness of the role of clinical research
  • Prepare and present at professional forums as applicable
  • Attend relevant training programs and mandatory educational programs, workshops, conference and promotional functions
  • Responsible for updating and maintaining Professional Portfolio to ensure requirements are met to maintain professional registration.
  • Maintain currency with nursing practice and industry requirements

Working conditions

Midwifery Researchers work in hospitals and/or universities in their own offices. They work normal office hours except when they are getting ready to present a paper at a Conference. They will carry out clinical trials in hospitals and write up their findings. They have to travel to conferences on a yearly basis.

Tools and technologies

Midwifery Researchers have to be able to work with data collection and use the computer constantly.

Education and training/entrance requirements

Midwifery Researchers have to have a first qualification in Midwifery followed by post-graduate qualifications to PhD level. As they are academic, a PhD is essential along with at least five years of relevant experience.


Employment Opportunities

Midwifery Researchers are dependent on being able to show that their research is strong enough to obtain a research grant. These yearly grants need a lot of preparation to guarantee success. However, mothers and babies care is crucial and birth rates are continuing to rise.

 

 

Professor Maralyn Jean Foureur - Midwifery Researcher - CAMEO
BA. Grad Dip Clin Epidem. PhD


Delivering new research for mums and midwives - Newcastle University, NSW
This article was totally sourced from Newcastle University

During her impressive 40-year research career, Professor Maralyn Foureur’s work has contributed to globally significant advancements in maternity care and midwifery for women and their support teams.

Maralyn Foureur
Maralyn in her academic gown indicating she has a PhD
(Source: Twitter)

Professor Maralyn Foureur is an internationally esteemed researcher and clinician in the field of maternity care and midwifery. Her work is highly acclaimed for its contribution to maternity care advancements in Australian hospitals. In fact, in the mid-1990s, Maralyn’s PhD study introduced an entirely new model of maternity care into Australia known as “continuity of care”, which is now championed as best practice in our country and many others worldwide.

Maralyn’s current research explores the impact of the built environment—specifically, birth units within Australian hospitals—on the birth experiences of women and their support teams, and therefore birth outcomes. For women and their families, Maralyn’s research is making a personal impact that will last generations.

My work helps midwives and other maternity care staff who need excellent knowledge and skills to support women well during childbirth. I want to make childbirth a positive and enriching experience for mothers, who will then take on the role of nurturing the next generation.”

Seamless, personalised care
Maralyn’s PhD research in the mid-1990s was ahead of its time. Her randomised controlled trial was the first project to explore “continuity of care” within midwifery—not just for low-risk women, but for all. What she uncovered would help revolutionise Australia’s approach to midwifery care in the years that followed.

My PhD had a major impact in Australia and internationally. This model enables women to meet a small group of midwives during pregnancy, one of whom will provide her with care throughout her labour and birth and in the early days with her new baby.”

The Conversation
An article by Prof. Maralyn Foureur
(Source: The Conversation)

Maralyn’s PhD research established the effectiveness of this new model.

Women overwhelmingly regard continuity of midwifery care during pregnancy, childbirth and the early postnatal period as the gold standard of care models. It meets their needs for a knowledgeable professional companion to guide them and their family through the unknown experience of childbirth.

“Women report feeling listened to and supported so that they never feel like just another patient having a baby, but that their care is highly, individually tailored to meet their needs
.”

Professor Maralyn Foureur

Together with evidence from 15 similar studies, Maralyn’s work now informs health policy across Australia and is cited by globally respected entities such as the Cochrane Collaboration and the World Health Organization. The studies demonstrated that women who were provided with continuity of care were 24 per cent less likely to experience preterm birth or early pregnancy loss.

At the University of Newcastle and elsewhere, continuity of care is now the primary model taught to midwifery students. It forms a significant part of their clinical placement experience; at the University of Newcastle, Bachelor of Midwifery students participate in a minimum of 10 relationship-based continuity of care experiences with childbearing women over the course of their studies.

By the time students step into the workforce, they are expertly equipped to provide women and families with the highest level of personalised care.

Students want to be able to learn within this model of care so that their education needs are individually met, and they are well-supported. Midwives also love working in this way and feel their professional skills are well-utilised when working in continuity of care.”

Creating space for new life
In the past decade, Maralyn’s research focus has shifted from continuity of care to the architecture and design of birth units in Australian hospitals.

Maralyn explains that the built environment can have a significant impact on a woman’s neurophysiology during childbirth. Despite this, Maralyn remains one of very few researchers who are exploring ways to improve birthing spaces for women and their support teams.

For staff, walking into a well-designed birth unit helps them to feel supported, calm and confident, to think clearly and carry out their work efficiently and effectively.

“We want to provide women and their families—and the staff who care for them—with an environment that is more likely to result in positive birth experiences for all
.”

Many women who give birth in the Hunter region will ultimately be able to see Maralyn’s work firsthand. Her research is influencing the design of maternity units across the region, including the newly planned birth units at John Hunter Hospital and Maitland Hospital. It also guided the best practice design of maternity units further afield, such as the Royal North Shore Hospital in Sydney.

My birth unit design research is considered world-leading. I really enjoy the creative process of designing research, designing birth units, and also designing education so that others can learn the creative process too.

Maralyn’s research—from continuity of care to birth unit design—has made Newcastle a national leader in maternity services and midwifery models of care research. Her work is helping to continually improve best practice and build a robust base of evidence that can benefit women, families, staff and communities.

I love being a researcher and partnering with other brilliant researchers in nursing, midwifery and medical sciences to answer the myriad of questions and challenges we face in health services across our region, nationally and internationally.

“Together, we are working to improve the health and wellbeing of our communities, and this makes me proud.

(Source: Newcastle University)


Maralyn is a Fellow of the Australian College of Midwives.

Maralyn is a proud mother of two and grandmother of 4 beautiful children.

Professor of Midwifery
University of Technology Sydney

Professor
University of Newcastle NSW
Jan 2019 - Present

Professor of Midwifery
University of Technology Sydney
2006 - Present

Professor of Midwifery
Victoria University of Wellington
1996 - 2006 - 10 years

Midwifery Consultant Hunter Area Health Service
John Hunter Hospital
1991 - 1995 - 4 years

Education
University of Newcastle NSW

PhD - RCT of model of midwifery care











































































































































UTS

UTS:Health Professor a finalist in the 2015 Telstra Business Women’s Awards
13 OCTOBER 2015



A midwife for 40 years and academic for the past 20 years, Maralyn leads a team of midwives who prepare graduates to competently and compassionately care for women during pregnancy, childbirth and early parenting.

In 1984 Maralyn set up the first independent midwifery practice in Australia with visiting rights to maternity hospitals in Newcastle, NSW.

With a record of 100 publications and more than $5 million in research grants to her name, Maralyn is regarded as a world leader in researching birth unit design and its impact on childbearing women and families, as well as the quality and safety of maternity care provided by midwives.

Her research findings have been translated into the design of several new Australian maternity units in Sydney, Canberra and Townsville.

 





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Vet

Firefighter

Garbage Collector

Midwife

Paramedic

Teacher

Dentist

physio

Optometrist

Special Care Worker

Medical Practitioner

Chiropractor

Ophthalmologist

Audiologist

Podiatrist

Medical Imaging Technologist

  Speech Pathologist

Occupational Therapist

Natural Therapist

SES Officer

Art Therapist

Dermatologist

Psychiatrist

Plastic or Reconstructive Surgeon

acupuncturist

Osteopath

Paediatrician

Neurologist

Indigenous Community Worker

Oncologist

Sports Doctor

Retirement Nursing Home Manager

Cardiologist

House Parent

Rheumatologist

Community Worker

Youth Worker

Anaesthetist

Intensive Care Specialist

Surgeon

Medical Radiation Therapist