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The Science behind frozen wind turbines - Retrieval Chart Strategy
  
So how can Australia transform into a renewable energy powerhouse without leaving anyone behind? 6 Thinking Hats

  
Wind Turbines & Birds
   
Mathematical Calculations & Wind Turbines
(A Range of Lesson Plans, Activities)

 

Online

The Science behind frozen wind turbines - Retrieval Chart Strategy

 High SchoolSecondary

CriticalAustralian Curriculum General Capability: Critical and creative thinking

LiteracyAustralian Curriculum General Capability: Literacy

NumeracyAustralian Curriculum General Capability: Numeracy

Australian Curriculum Cross Curriculum Priorities: Sustainability Priority

 

Cooperative LearningCooperative Learning Activity

 

TeacherTeacher Instructions

To undertake the Retrieval Chart Strategy, look up the process instructions here.

 

 

1. In groups of 3 - 4 students, you are to read and analyse the following article from
The Conversation 5 March 2021. Read
Analyse

The Conversation

2. Using the following Retrieval Chart, each student is to individually fill it in using the article as the source.

The Science Problem behind frozen wind turbines Science Experiments used - description & findings Mathematics? Critical
Analysis
My Knowledge
& Understanding

Questions arising
         
       
       
       
       
       

 

3. As a group, compare notes and find solutions to any questions arising. Add to your individual charts from others in the group.

4. As a class, list any questions that remained unanswered by the groups and discuss.

5. Answer the following questions:

a. What aspect of the article fascinated you the most? Why?

b. Did you understant the mathematics and science behind this article? Do you need to investigate further?

c. What aspect(s) do you still need clarifying? List on a Post-it and put onto the class enquiry board.

 

 

So how can Australia transform into a renewable energy powerhouse without leaving anyone behind? 6 Thinking Hats

MiddleMiddle  High SchoolSecondary

CriticalAustralian Curriculum General Capability: Critical and creative thinking

NumeracyAustralian Curriculum General Capability: Numeracy

Australian Curriculum Cross Curriculum Priorities: Sustainability Priority

PhilosophyPhilosophy

Cooperative LearningCooperative Learning Activity

 

 

Introduction & Process

 

6 Thinking Hats
(Source: Medium)

In groups of 6 students, each student is to select one hat to be their perspective or role.
 
Allocated the colours by putting in a hat and getting students to pull out their colour and therefore their role.
Students are to stay in that role [colour] for all of the discussion bringing their perspective to the discussion - even if they don't agree personally with that role.

NO negative comments about the person or the role is to be tolerated.

In a discussion, each group of 6 students is a team.
  
Teams can use these hats in any order during a discussion, but typically progress from blue, to white, to green, to yellow, to red, and finally to black.

Any hat could make a reappearance in the discussion. For example, after facts (white) are laid out, more process (blue) may be applied, or after pros (yellow) and cons (black) are discussed, new ideas (green) may surface. (Source: StoryBoardThat)

The Hats In Detail

White The white hat is the information hat. It requires the wearer to seek out hard, factual information related to the project or question at hand. Look at the information that you have, analyze past trends, and see what you can learn from it. Look for gaps in your knowledge, and try to either fill them or take account of them. The white hat is objective and implies no judgment of the value of the information.
Red The red hat invites the wearer to focus on their intuition, gut reaction, and emotion. Think how others could react emotionally. Although emotions and intuition aren’t easily explainable, feelings play an important role in thinking and decision-making. Seek to understand the responses of people who do not fully know your reasoning.
Black The black hat is for judgment, to look at a decision’s potential negative outcomes. It’s an opportunity to be critical or skeptical without inhibition, a useful technique to avoid mistakes and guard against excess optimism. This is important because it highlights the weak points in a plan. It allows you to eliminate them, alter them, or prepare contingency plans to counter them.
Yellow The yellow hat is devoted to benefits. It helps wearers to think positively about potential outcomes, seek the merits of an idea, and reach an optimistic assessment of how it can work. This hat helps maintain momentum and a positive spirit in the face of a challenging situation.
Green The green hat represents creativity. It explores possibilities, alternatives, and new ideas. This hat can be intimidating, because many people tell themselves that they’re not creative. Like a muscle, creativity can be developed and strengthened with practice. The green hat gives people a safe space in which to think creatively.
Blue The blue hat is the organizing hat. It controls the process of using the other hats and clarifies the objectives. It can also be used to explore the process of implementing an idea. How will it be done? In what sequence will actions need to be taken?

(Source: Medium)


1. You are to form a team of 6 students and take on the role of one of the 6 hats.

2. You are to read and take notes [be mindful of your role] the following articles from The Conversation

 

The Conversation 22 July 2021 Analyse

The Conversation

The Conversation 11 March 2022 Analyse

The Conversation

The Conversation 5 May 2022 Analyse

The Conversation

The Conversation 27 May 2022 Analyse

The Conversation

3. As a team and from your roles, you are to discuss the question:

So how can Australia transform into a renewable energy powerhouse without leaving anyone behind?

 

 

 

Wind Turbines & Birds: A Community of Inquiry

High SchoolSecondary

NumeracyAustralian Curriculum General Capability: Numeracy

Personal and social capabilityAustralian Curriculum General Capability: Personal and social capability

Ethical Understanding Australian Curriculum General Capability: Ethical Understanding

Australian Curriculum Cross Curriculum Priorities: Sustainability Priority

PhilosophyPhilosophy

Cooperative LearningCooperative Learning Activity

TeacherTeacher
Before conducting this activity, you need to know the process behind a Community of Inquiry.

 

Students

1. In groups of 3 - 4 students, you are to investigate the claim that wind turbines effects birds in a disadvantageous way. Read the following articles:

The Conversation 16 June 2017 Read

The Conversation
  

The Conversation 3 September 2020 Read

The Conversation

 

The Conversation 7 January 2021 Read

The Conversation

2. Together write up your notes especially the arguments for and against. You also need to note any facts and figures.

Write up 2 questions for each of the Question Quadrant:

Question Quadrant

3. Using the Inquiry questions, place your group's two questions on a post-it note and put along with the class' other group's two questions.

Work out from the questions which is the question that re-occurs the most.

4. Hold a Community of Inquiry.

 

 

Mathematical Calculations and Wind Turbines

NumeracyAustralian Curriculum General Capability: Numeracy

Personal and social capabilityAustralian Curriculum General Capability: Personal and social capability

New Zealand Maths - Wind Power [PDF]

PrimaryPrimary

TeacherTeacher
If the above link is not working,
here is the Wind Power [PDF] which contains two activities around graphing and Wind Power. Print off and provide students with graph paper.

Wind Turbine Power Calculations - Royal Academy of Engineering UK [PDF]

High SchoolSecondary

TeacherTeacher
Contains introduction to the Maths behind Wind Turbines and have 3 activities to complete.

If the above link is not working, click here for a local copy.
Working with Wind Energy - Design Your Own Windmill - Try Engineering

PrimaryPrimary MiddleMiddle  High SchoolSecondary

TeacherTeacher
Lesson Plan [PDF - 33 pages]

YouTube Video
Student Worksheet Word doc 4 pages - Landscape
Wind Energy Math Calculations: Calculating the Tip Speed Ratio of Your Wind Turbine [PDF]

MiddleMiddle 

TeacherTeacher
Contains Imperial measurements which will need converting first. 9 Sample problems after four pages of explanations.


If the above link is not working, click here for a local copy.
Hydro Australia

PrimaryPrimary

Year 6: Science and Mathematics
There is little mathematics here but still good activities.

Teacher's Guide: What is wind energy;
local copy here

Lesson Plan 1: Exploring Wind Farms
Local copy here.

Worksheet: Design a wind turbine
Local copy here

Worksheet: Debate the advantages and disadvantages of wind energy
Local copy here

Worksheet: Create a project plan
Local copy here

Hydro Australia

MiddleMiddle 

Year 7: Discover Wind Energy

This inquiry-based unit helps students discover the basic fundamentals of wind power technology by building and testing wind turbines. The challenge is to generate the greatest amount of electricity by varying the numbers, angles, sizes and shapes of turbine blades.

Teacher's Guide: Discover wind energy
Local copy here

Lesson Plan
Local copy here

Student Worksheet
Local copy here

Map of Tasmania's windfarms
Local copy here


Wind Turbine Math Minute by Dr Frank Wang
https://youtu.be/gknrqKQVuLs

Can you easily convert Dr Frank's USA calculations to metric?

 

 

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