Fun Activities

On The Job

Community and Health - NEUROLOGIST 

Online

Does my brain really freeze when I eat ice cream?

PrimaryPrimary


Personal and social capability
Australian Curriculum General Capability:
Personal and social capability

NumeracyAustralian Curriculum General Capability: Numeracy

Cooperative LearningCooperative Learning Activity

 

1. In groups of 4 - 5 students, you are to read the following article from The Conversation 2 January 2017 Reading

The Conversation

2. Power Words

Write down all the new words [words you haven't come across yet] and the science behind a "brain freeze".

3. Test the Research!

The article states:

Research shows how long brain freeze headaches last relates to the surface area of the mouth that comes into contact with the cold stimulus. So, if you want to reduce your chance of a brain freeze, you may want to avoid gulping down your ice cream all at once. Take small nibbles instead.


In your group, each person is to use an ice-block to see if they get a brain freeze. Make sure that the ice blocks are the same size and quite large.
Each student is to gulp down as much ice-block as possible.

Record and graph the results.

Re-test but this time use
crushed ice blocks that are smaller in area. This time, the student is to nibble the ice-block pieces.

Record and graph the results.

Was there a difference in results?
4. Re-do the infographic in this article so you can explain a "brain freeze" to younger students.

 

Research Study: How much sleep, on average, does your class get?

 MiddleMiddle

CriticalAustralian Curriculum General Capability: Critical and creative thinking
Personal and social capability
Australian Curriculum General Capability:
Personal and social capability

NumeracyAustralian Curriculum General Capability: Numeracy

LiteracyAustralian Curriculum General Capability: Literacy

Cooperative LearningCooperative Learning Activity

 

 

 1. In groups of 4 - 5 students, you are to read the following article Readingin The Conversation 7 March 2018

The Conversation

 

2. Reflection

Reflection.

Summarise the points made in the article.
What surprised you?

Discussion

Discuss amongst the group.


3. Over the course of the next week, collect, in detail, the number of hours and minutes you sleep. You are also to note down the number of times you wake up during the night. Do you "catch up" on sleep during the weekend?

4. Compile your results with those of your group and then the rest of the class. Graph the results.

5. As a class, are you getting enough sleep according to the article?

6. If you were a Neurologist, what measures would you take to increase the sleeping patterns [no matter how small] of children in school  -  Primary, Middle and Secondary?

Write down your thoughts.

7. Discussion

Discuss amongst the group and come up with at least 3 ideas to help your class to get more sleep. Why is it important to get more sleep?

 

Concussion & Statistics

MiddleMiddle  High SchoolSecondary

NumeracyAustralian Curriculum General Capability: Numeracy

CriticalAustralian Curriculum General Capability: Critical and creative thinking

Cooperative LearningCooperative Learning Activity

 

1. In groups of 3 - 5 students, you are to read or view the following articles using the Expert Jigsaw Strategy. This entails that each of you will read ONE article, summarise it, and, share your knowledge with the rest of the group.

The Conversation 18 February 2016

The Conversation

 

The Conversation 5 May 2021

The Conversation

 

The Conversation 29 March 2021

The Conversation

 

The Conversation 19 March 2021

The Conversation

 

Resource 5: The Conversation - Articles on Concussion: Your Choice

The Conversation

Resource 6: BTN High: Concussion Class Action 21 March 2023

ABC BTN Concussion Class Action

 

2. Each student is to compile facts and figures (statistics) on their article. You are to share with your group using the Expert Jigsaw Strategy about what you have learnt. It is important that each student in your group fully understands your article. Provide the other students in your group with your facts and figures gleaned from your article. 

3. Combine these statistics into a coherent presentation as an infographic as a group. Collaboration is the key to a great infographic.

To create an infographic look at this page.

Present your group's infographic to the class.

4. Discussion

Class discussion:

Warm up questions: What have you learnt about "Concussion and the Brain?"
What do the statistics say about concussion?

 

Main Question: "The Brain is....."

 

Did You Know?


To test coordination in a patient, a Neurologist will ask the patient to touch their nose and then the Neurologist's finger in quick succession.

Challenge: In groups of 3 - 4 students, allocate:
a. The Patient - who will demonstrate their ability to touch their nose and touch the Neurologist finger.
b. The Neurologist - who will make sure that the Patient is carrying out the task correctly
c. The Timekeeper - who will use a stop watch and sing out at 30 secs
d. The Counter - who will count the number of times the patient accurately touches their nose and then the Neurologist's finger.

Swap all roles so that in the end, each student has had a turn at being the Patient.

Average the results within your group. Share with the rest of the class.

Are the results for each group similiar?

 

 

side 5

side bar

side bar

sidebar 9

Jeweller side

side 5

side bar

side bar

sidebar 9

Jeweller side

side 5

side bar

side bar

sidebar 9

Jeweller side

side 5

side bar

side bar

sidebar 9

Jeweller side