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Chartered Accountant
Finance Controller [TV & Film]
Forensic Accountant
Management Accountant
Production Accountant  [TV & Film]
Tax Consultant/Agent

Related Jobs or Working with these Jobs

 

 

Clerical or OrganisingAnalytic or ScientificSkill Level 4Skill Level 5

Accountants analyse, report and give advice on the operations and affairs of businesses and individuals.    FutureGrowthModerate

Accountants work for a variety of organisations, from families, retail outlets, banks and accounting firms, to rock bands or sporting organisations. They may work on their own or with other accountants.
 

Accountants assist organisations, individuals and businesses by analysing and reporting on financial matters. Their duties might include providing advice on a company's efficiency after examining its running costs and profit margins, helping individual clients with their tax returns and lodgements, or conducting audits and investigations into businesses dealing with differing scenarios (such as bankruptcy, mergers, sales or acquisitions).

ANZSCO ID & description: 221111: Plans and provides systems and services related to the financial dealings of organisations and individuals, and advises on associated record-keeping and compliance requirements (registration or licensing is required).

Alternative names:
Finance Manager

Specialisations:

Budget Accountant: A budget accountant primarily concerned with the development and maintenance of budgeting systems. This involves monitoring budgets and comparing them with actual costs and revenues. They analyse records to determine trends, which assists in managerial control.

Bursar: A bursar responsible for the accounting and general business operation of schools or tertiary institutions. This may include fundraising.

Cost Accountant: A cost accountant develops and directs systems so that costs can be recorded and analysed to work out each unit cost. This involves analysing changes that affect production costs (e.g. raw materials, manufacturing methods, factory overheads and wages). They provide management with reports to assist in decision-making about production volumes, sale prices and additions or deletions to product lines and/or manufacturing or distribution resources.

Financial Analyst

Forensic Accountant: A forensic accountant analyses and prepares accounting documents for use as evidence, often for a court of law.

Insolvency Practitioner

Investment Analyst: An investment analyst evaluates the value of companies for potential buyers and investors, and investigates businesses being sold, bought or merged. Liquidator

Liquidator and Receiver: A liquidator and receiver assists and advises businesses in financial difficulties, organises company closures in line with legal requirements and, in the case of bankruptcies, sells assets.

Systems Accountant: A systems accountant analyses financial information needs for organisations by reviewing existing systems and working out the best way to meet those needs.

Taxation Consultant/Taxation Agent: A taxation consultant/taxation agent prepares taxation returns and reports, provides advice on tax issues and handles disputes with taxation authorities. Tax Agent

Treasurer: A treasurer plans short- and long-term finance and advises on the financial consequences. They design and manage investment portfolios to minimise financial risk
.

Knowledge, skills and attributes Accountant with calculator

An accountant needs:

  • strong communication skills

  • good presentation skills

  • able to build rapport with clients

  • good organisational skills

  • good mathematical ability

  • problem-solving skills

  • to be professional, ethical, responsible and discretion when dealing with confidential information

  • good attention to detail

  • able to work as part of a team.

Duties and Tasks

Accountants may perform the following tasks:

  • assist in the formulation of budgetary and accounting policies

  • prepare financial statements for presentation to boards of directors, management, shareholders and statutory bodies

  • conduct financial investigations, undertake audits, prepare reports and advise on such matters as the purchase and sale of businesses, mergers, financing, suspected fraud, insolvency and taxation

  • examine the income and expenditure of institutions

  • provide assurance about the accuracy of information contained in financial reports and their compliance with statutory requirements

  • provide financial and taxation advice on business structures, plans and operations

  • liaise with bankers and brokers to establish funds management arrangements

  • advise on the selection and application of computer-based accounting systems

  • appraise cash flow and financial risk of investment projects.

Working conditions

Although accountants work primarily in an office environment during business hours, during busier periods or when dealing with a financial crisis they may need to work much later hours in order to successfully manage complex situations and procedures.

Accountants may work on their own or with other accountants. Accountants in private practice have a high level of public contact. Some positions involve travel, which is often interstate or overseas.

Tools and technologies

Accountants work mainly with computerised financial software and programs so it is important that they remain up-to-date with this type of technology. Calculations, statistics and monetary figures are significant to accountants so spreadsheets and databases are used on a daily basis to help organise and store important information. Accountants also need to keep up-to-date with Australian tax laws, as even minor changes may be of significant impact to a client.

Education and training/entrance requirements

To become an accountant, you usually need to complete a bachelor degree majoring in accounting.
The qualifications required to become an accountant depend on the type of accountant you want to be.  

 

Did You Know?

John Grisham, famous mystery novelist, received his undergraduate degree in accounting from Mississippi State University.


John Grisham


Luca Pacioli wrote the first book on double entry accounting in 1494. He is frequently referred to as the father of accounting. Paciolo is still a hot commodity today. His portrait was featured in the movie The Spanish Prisoner.

Luca Pacioli
Portrait of Luca Pacioli, traditionally attributed to Jacopo de' Barbari, 1495
(Source: Fun Facts and Famous Accountants)

 

Chartered Accountant
Banking Finance Insurance

Clerical or OrganisingAnalytic or ScientificSkill Level 5Skill Level 6

A chartered accountant is a financial professional with technical and specialised knowledge of accounting. They can work in almost every sector from financial services and banking to the health care and industrial sector, where they may perform accounting duties and make strategic decisions that can drive business. Future Growth Strong
  
Chartered accountants are fully qualified accountants that take on a broad and important role. In a nutshell, they analyse and provide information about financial records, with focus areas including financial reporting, taxation, corporate finance, business recovery, and insolvency. They will also often be responsible for auditing accounts and giving financial advice that may be acted upon by the recipient to save money or increase profitability.

Chartered accountants can work in a range of organisations and it’s even possible to work across sectors, in public practice and industry as well as the not-for-profit and public sectors.

ANZSCO ID: 221112

Knowledge, skills and attributes

  • Self-motivation: A career in accountancy may not be rewarding straight away. Studying for exams, alongside working, can prove difficult – so self-motivation and commitment are both must-have skills for hopeful chartered accountants.

  • Organisation: Whilst studying, you’ll need organisation to adequately manage your time between working in accounting and studying for your exams. Once qualified, you’ll need it to manage your workload between clients or projects.

  • Computing: Computer software plays a large role in the accountant’s workday. Whether it’s balancing budgets in Microsoft Excel, using a database to update client information, or using third party invoicing software, all accountants must be confident in using computers.

  • Problem solving: Accountants are responsible for balancing books and providing advice to clients. In some cases, this might mean doing research to ensure that problems are solved and averted properly. Using initiative, you should be able to resolve issues proactively in a way that is beneficial for each specific client.

  • Numeracy: As an accountant, you’ll work with numbers day in, day out. Accountants should have strong numeracy skills and understand how to analyse data efficiently.

  • Teamwork and leadership: As with any other office-based role, accountants should work well both independently and as part of a team. Having leadership capabilities


Becoming a Chartered Accountant (CA) in Australia | The process revealed!
https://youtu.be/2Eh5TH-bPNM

 

 

Duties and Tasks

  • Managing budgets

  • Undertaking financial audits

  • Providing financial advice

  • Liaising with clients, individuals, and businesses

  • Analysing risk

  • Advising on tax planning

  • Maintaining accounting records and preparing accounts information

  • Counselling clients on areas of financial improvement

  • Managing junior colleagues

  • Liaising with auditors (internal or external)

  • Producing reports and recommendations following the audits

  • Preparing financial statements and monthly and annual accounts

  • Negotiating terms with suppliers

  • Invoicing


Working conditions

You will work in an office for 40 hours a week except during the busy periods of the financial year. You might have travel depending on your clients. You will be expected to keep up to date with the latest ever-changing tax laws and certification requirements.


Education and training/entrance requirements

To begin this career, consider completing a bachelor of accounting or bachelor of commerce or business with a major in accounting and finance at an accredited university. Individuals who wish to enrol in a chartered accountant program may apply for provisional memberships.

To become a Chartered Accountant and a member of the Institute of Chartered Accountants Australia, accounting professionals need to complete the Chartered Accountants Program. The program includes both a study component (Graduate Diploma of Chartered Accounting) and a minimum three years of practical experience, mentored by a Chartered Accountant.


Employment Opportunities

When you become a chartered accountant, you can gain a competitive edge over general accountants. Your qualifications can be internationally recognised, meaning you can work anywhere around the world. With your qualification, you can also choose to specialise in a particular area of accounting. Later on, you can also transition into roles such as a chief financial officer or a financial controller.

 

Forensic Accountant
Banking Finance Insurance

Clerical or OrganisingAnalytic or ScientificSkill Level 5Skill Level 6

Forensic accountants are highly skilled in analysing and preparing financial information for a court of law. It's a field that requires a combination of accounting, auditing and investigative skills.

Accountants in this field of work will typically be engaged to review financial records and information in a post-acquisition dispute, economic damages, calculations bankruptcy and computer forensics. Future Growth Strong

Business valuations, insolvency and fraud issues can also typically require the skills of a forensic accountant. Forensic accountants specialise in uncovering undeclared assets, tracing funds and explaining financial situations. They may also provide clarity and act as a witness in circumstances such as court cases, criminal investigations, insurance fraud and the misappropriation of funds.

Forensic accountants may provide assistance for the following:

  • Divorce cases: searching for hidden assets to determine a fair settlement

  • Civil lawsuits: providing evidence for breach of contracts

  • Business acquisitions: mediating company acquisition disagreements

  • Vehicle accidents: assessing the economic damages arising from vehicle accident insurance claims

  • Medical insurance claims: evaluating medical malpractice claims

  • Commercial valuations: providing financial clarity for business valuation disputes

  • Trade patents or branding: investigating patent or trademark infringements

  • Business agreements: establishing economic outcomes of a non-compete agreement or breach of non-disclosure

  • Business purchases: determining warranty breaches

While not all cases may lead to formal litigation, Forensic Accountants are required to produce information to a standard that would be suitable for use in a court of law.

The standards related this field are set by the Accounting Professional and Ethical Standards Board (APESB).

Forensic Accountant
(Source: GradAustralia)

ANZSCO ID: 221112

Alternative names: Investigative Auditor, Fraud Investigator, Forensic Auditor,

Specialisations: You can specialise in a particular field as a forensic accountant. After working as a forensic auditor for a few years, you can choose to specialise and grow your expertise in a specific field, such as private investigator training, business audits and valuations or bankruptcy and insolvency.

Knowledge, skills and attributes

A forensic accountant examines and explains intricate business and financial transactions. A forensic accountant usually has an inquisitive, curious mind with strong analytical and financial skills and an ability to interpret data beyond the figures on the page.

  • Critical thinking skills: Detecting fraudulent activity involves evaluating information with a critical mind to make connections that lead to evidence. Critical thinking involves gathering information through observation, reasoning and auditing processes that highlight any discrepancies.

  • Communication skills: Forensic accountants require strong verbal and written skills to present their findings in business environments or courts. Communicating complex financial reports with precision, clarity and simplicity is an important part of working as a forensic accountant.

  • Analytical skills: Analytical skills are important for interviewing people and reviewing documentation. Analysing information accurately is important for determining the type of financial crime committed.
    Interviewing skills: Part of investigating potentially fraudulent activity frequently involves interviewing people. The ability to make people feel at ease may help a forensic accountant get the information they want.

  • Attention to detail: Detecting financial irregularities and slight discrepancies take a keen ability to note fine details. Meticulously documenting investigation steps and findings also requires attention to detail.

  • Problem-solving skills: Forensic accountants may use their problem-solving skills to adapt an investigation as new information becomes available. Evaluating potential scenarios to determine which is consistent with the evidence is often part of their problem-solving ability.


Forensic Accountant
(Source: Antony Syndicate)

 

Duties and Tasks

A forensic accountant makes use of accounting, auditing and investigative skills and software to examine suspicious financial activity. Determining whether a crime has taken place is outside of a forensic accountant's scope. Their responsibility is to analyse all available information and present it in a way that a company or the judicial system can accurately assess and pass judgment. A forensic accountant's work product typically meets the standards suited for presentation in a court of law, even if the situation doesn't escalate to that point.

  • assessing damages and losses
  • tracking and tracing funds
  • identifying and recovering assets
  • researching and documenting findings, this may include a due diligence review
  • testifying in court cases as an expert witness and presenting evidence to juries and judges
  • preparing visual aids to support trial evidence
  • conducting financial audits
  • gathering and analysing data for litigation
  • assisting in alternative dispute resolutions
  • staying current on the financial services industry, financial markets and legal changes
  • mediating and assisting with third-party negotiations
  • knowing and understanding the rules of evidence


Introduction to the World of Forensic Accountants FINAL (12.30m)
https://youtu.be/SjAcnce5uqM

 

Working conditions

Forensic accountants may work for law enforcement agencies, government departments, independent adjustment firms, insurance companies, banks and businesses of all sizes. Large accounting firms may have a dedicated forensic accounting department. Some businesses exist to provide forensic financial investigation services.

As an investigative accountant, you may work on-site to conduct forensic analysis. You may also work as part of a team that includes other forensic auditors, detectives, private investigators and business stakeholders. You may appear in court to explain your findings if your work is part of the evidence presented in a case.


Tools and technologies

Since forensic accountants are both accountants and investigators, they use tools applicable to both. These include bookkeeping and accounting software, computer forensic tools like data-mining applications, and statistical principles like Benford’s Law.

How to become
(Source: Kaplan UK)


Education and training/entrance requirements

Forensic accounant positions typically ask for a bachelor's degree in accounting, finance or forensic accounting. Students who aim to be forensic accountants may take classes in subjects which include the following:

  • finance
  • auditing
  • criminology
  • investigating, detecting and documenting fraud
  • fraud prevention and ethics
  • interview techniques
  • computer investigation
  • bankruptcy
  • electronic data analysis
  • business, intellectual and individual property damages and calculations
  • mergers and acquisitions
  • family law and divorce engagements
  • financial statement fraud, asset misappropriation and corruption

Forensic accountants are usually CAs (Chartered Accountants) or CPAs (Certified Practising Accountants). CA and CPA certifications may require an accountant to work for a pre-determined number of hours to fulfil the experience requirements. Some CA or CPA organisations offer specialised forensics subgroups for professional networking. They may also provide opportunities for further training in the field.


Employment Opportunities

A Master of Forensic Accounting allows you to conduct an advanced investigation into a case and gain an extensive understanding of the legal framework. The credits you gain from a master's can help you enrol for a Doctor of Philosophy in Forensic Accounting and Auditing. This course enables you to specialise in a key area of forensic accounting, such as cyber accounting or fraud management.

Alternatively, you can consider gaining a Graduate Certificate in Business (Forensic Accounting) or a Graduate Diploma of Forensic Accounting. Postgraduate qualifications can help you progress to senior roles and take on higher-profile cases.

 

Forensic Accountant
(Source: Fresh Books)

Management Accountant
Banking Finance Insurance

Clerical or OrganisingSkill Level 4Skill Level 5

 

Management accountants work internally in a business and record and analyse the financial accounts of the company for which they work. Management Accountants provide services relating to performance-based financial reporting, asset valuation, budgetary systems, cost management, pricing, forecasting and the strategic governance of organisations. Future Growth Strong

ANZSCO ID: 221112

Alternative names: Cost Accountant

Specialisations: Carbon Accountant, Product Accountant

Knowledge, skills and attributes   

To become a management accountant, you would need:

  • the ability to interpret figures and information
  • excellent maths and IT skills
  • strong analytical and problem-solving ability
  • a high degree of accuracy and attention to detail
  • good spoken and written communication skills
  • good organisational and time management skills  

Overview
(Source: Wikipedia)

Duties and Tasks

As a management accountant, you would:

  • prepare all of the financial statements for the company
  • manage budgets, and undertake annual forecasting and budget planning
  • make recommendations for cost reductions and savings
  • monitor the company's financial performance
  • recommend ways to reduce costs and increase profits
  • undertake or oversee internal auditing
  • assists in formulating budgetary and accounting policies
  • prepares financial statements for presentation to boards of directors, management, shareholders, and governing and statutory bodies
  • conducts financial investigations, prepares reports, undertaking audits and advises on matters such as the purchase and sale of businesses, mergers, capital financing, suspected fraud, insolvency and taxation
  • examines operating costs and organisations' income and expenditure
  • provides assurance about the accuracy of information contained in financial reports and their compliance with statutory requirements
  • prepare the business accounts for external audit
  • oversee the company's payroll and bookkeeping systems

 

Management Accountant
(Source: Strategic Finance)

Working conditions

Management accountants generally work normal office hours, Monday to Friday, with occasional overtime to meet deadlines at busy times. Part-time work may be possible.

You would usually be based in an office environment, and spend most of your time sitting at, and using a computer. You would spend a portion of time in meetings with the accounting team and management.

Education and training/entrance requirements

You would become a management accountant by completing a diploma or degree in accounting, or a related field such as business or commerce with a major in accounting. To get into these courses you usually need to gain your senior secondary school certificate or equivalent. English and mathematics would be appropriate subjects to study prior to university.

Graduates of approved courses may qualify for membership or entry to the membership programs offered by Chartered Accountants Australia and New Zealand, CPA Australia or the Institute of Public Accountants. Eligibility for membership varies and may require work experience and/or further study.

Qualified and registered Accountants can specialise as Management Accountants by completing a Certificate of Business Accounting through the Charted Institute of Management Accountants.

Employment Opportunities

Employment of accountants is projected to grow strongly over the next 3-5 years. Employment growth is expected to be closely tied to the health of the overall economy.

There has been an increased focus on accounting and financial compliance in response to stricter laws and regulations, particularly in the financial sector. The continued globalisation of business should lead to increased demand for accounting expertise and services in areas such as international trade and international mergers and acquisitions.

 

Tax Consultant/Agent
Banking Finance Insurance

Clerical or OrganisingSkill Level 5

Tax consultants help individual or business with tax advice, tax returns and lodgements, and planning their finances. Future Growth StrongTaxation Accountants analyse, report and provide advice on taxation issues to organisations or individuals, prepare taxation returns and reports, and handle disputes with taxation authorities. 

ANZSCO ID: 221113

Alternative names: Taxation Accountant, Tax Agent,

Knowledge, skills and attributes       

To become a tax consultant, you would need:

  • the ability to interpret figures and information
  • excellent maths and IT skills
  • strong analytical and problem-solving ability
  • a high degree of accuracy and attention to detail
  • good spoken and written communication skills
  • good organisational and time management skills

Tax Consultant
(Source: Anthony Syndicate)

Duties and Tasks

  • meet clients and discuss their financial situation
  • gather information and data needed to complete tax returns
  • use specialised accounting software to fill in, check and lodge tax returns
  • explain tax laws and regulations to clients
  • advise clients on tax planning so they don't overpay tax
  • examines operating costs and organisations' income and expenditure.
  • provides assurance about the accuracy of information contained in financial reports and their compliance with statutory requirements
  • provides financial and taxation advice on business structures, plans and operations
  • prepares taxation returns for individuals and organisations
  • liaises with financial institutions and brokers to establish funds management arrangements
  • introduces and maintains accounting systems, and advises on the selection and application of computer-based accounting systems
  • maintains internal control systems
  • may appraise cash flow and financial risk of capital investment projects.
  • negotiate with the Australian Taxation Office on your client’s behalf
  • keep up to date with tax laws and regulations
  • provide other accountancy services in some instances.

Working conditions

In a full-time role, you would typically work standard office hours, Monday to Friday, with possible overtime at busy periods, such as the end of the tax year.

You might work for an accounting firm, a firm of specialist tax agents, or be self-employed. You would be office-based but may spend time travelling to clients for meetings and audits. A current driver's licence may be needed.

 

Education and training/entrance requirements

Tax agents are usually qualified accountants. You would become an accountant by completing a diploma or degree in accounting, or a related field such as business or commerce with a major in accounting. To get into these courses you usually need to gain your senior secondary school certificate or equivalent. English and mathematics would be appropriate subjects to study prior to tertiary study or university.

In some instances, tax agents are qualified lawyers with the appropriate qualifications to be certified to practise law in Australia.

Tax agents need to be registered with the federal Tax Practitioners Board. Individual applicants must satisfy certain qualifications and experience requirements, which are set out in the Tax Agent Services Regulations 2009.

Employment Opportunities

Employment of tax agents is expected to remain neutral or decline slightly in the next 3-5 years.

For corporate organisations there has been an increased focus on accounting and financial compliance in response to stricter laws and regulations. Additionally, the continued globalisation of business should lead to increased demand for accounting expertise and services as they relate to tax matters.

For personal tax and small businesses there is an increasing number of sotwares available to use in place of a tax consultant. In Australia the Australian Tax Office has launched an online system for people to self-complete their tax forms.

Finance Controller
Banking Finance Insurance

Clerical or OrganisingAnalytic or ScientificSkill Level 5Skill Level 6

Finance controllers (TV & Film) oversee the team that makes sure a production is legally and financially managed. They have a high level of authority, to the extent they can even override a producer with their decisions.

They are often employed by the studio, financier or broadcaster that’s investing in, or commissioning, the production. They are accountable to the people who have come up with the cash, so it’s their job to make sure the film is completed within budget and the money is spent properly.

A Financial Controller (Corporate) is responsible for delivering financial performance of their division or business unit to meet or exceed corporate targets. A Financial Controller is responsible for financial planning and analysis, forecasting, budgeting, and internal control. A Financial Controller may also be responsible for financial reporting to management and the board of directors, as well as compliance with government regulations.

In smaller businesses, a Financial Controller may wear many hats and have additional responsibilities such as accounts payable and receivable, human resources, and information technology. Larger organisations typically have staff who specialise in each of these areas.

Day in Life of Financial Controller
(Source: Liveabout)

ANZSCO ID: 221111

Alternative names: Financial Controller,


Knowledge, skills and attributes

For the TV and Film Industry

  • Knowledge of film production: understand how film and TV dramas are made, love the industry
  • Communication: listen to and be understood by everyone from producers, financiers, production accountants and cashiers
  • Negotiation: be able to influence and persuade
  • Discretion: be able to maintain confidences

 

For the Company 

A Financial Controller is responsible for overseeing all financial aspects of a company, and as such needs to have a strong understanding of finance and accounting principles.

  • Strong analytical abilities – to be able to analyse financial data and identify trends and opportunities
  • Excellent accounting knowledge – to be able to accurately prepare financial statements
  • Good leadership and communication capabilities – to be able to effectively manage and communicate with staff at all levels of the organisation
  • Proficient in MS Excel and other financial software – to be able to use financial modelling and forecasting tools

Soft skills are also valuable to a Financial Controller role.

Some necessary soft skills include:

  • Attention to detail – to ensure all financial transactions are properly accounted for
  • Strong organisation skills – to manage and keep track of multiple financial tasks simultaneously
  • Problem-solving skills – to be able to identify and resolve financial issues as they arise
  • Time management skills – to ensure deadlines are made


 

Andrew Knoakes, Co-Producer and Financial Controller of James Bond
https://youtu.be/e6nwcdWW6lo

 

 

Duties and Tasks

The main role of a Financial Controller is to ensure the company's financial health by overseeing all financial planning and analysis activities. They may also be involved with mergers and acquisitions, which requires an understanding of complex accounting issues such as purchase price allocations.

  • Provide final review of balance sheets and cash flow forecasts
  • Support the development of divisional budgets
  • Prepare divisional monthly management reports
  • Conduct divisional expense analysis
  • Monitor division expenditure, cash receipts and forecast changes to the division budget
  • Control allocations to division projects forecast variances between actual results and budgeted results
  • Reconcile bank accounts; assist with preparation
  • Tracking, reporting, and analysing budget variances
  • Reviewing the company's financial statements to ensure they are accurate
  • Preparing month-end reports for management, including profit and loss statements, balance sheets, and cash flow statements
  • Recommending changes in policies or procedures that will improve financial performance
  • Forecasting future financial performance
  • Preparing and analysing budgets
  • Providing accurate financial reports to management
  • Ensuring compliance with government regulations


Working conditions

Who does a finance controller work with - TV & Film?

  • Production accountants: are responsible for costing productions, liaising with financiers and controlling cash flow

  • Key assistant accountants: are responsible for the accurate accounting up to the 'trial balance' stage. This is liaising with banks and maintaining records with receipts of all transactions. They maintain records of all cast and crew on payroll. They also monitor and maintain petty cash systems.

  • Assistant accountant (second assistant, third assistant): Assistants help with the day-to-day running of the accountancy office. This may involve keeping records of invoices and creditors' payments and the preparation of accounts payable, invoices, purchase orders and petty cash and payroll calculation. They process online payments, maintain filing and invoice monitoring systems, and audit petty cash envelopes. On bigger productions where there are multiple assistant accountants, one may carry out the duties of the central cashier while the second assistant may be responsible for all the accounts payable.

  • Accounts trainee or cashier: Trainees are responsible for making and recording payments and helping to control accounts.


Finance Controller
(Source: Investopedia)

Tools and technologies

TV & Film: Using finance software: use Movie Magic Budgeting or other finance packages.

Company: As above for Accountant


Education and training/entrance requirements

A Financial Controller typically has a degree in accounting or finance, or needs to complete a professional accounting qualification such as CPA or CA. Many employers also prefer candidates with experience in financial analysis, financial modelling, and Microsoft Excel.


Employment Opportunities

TV & Film

Finance controllers have spent many years working in the industry before moving into this senior position. Some go into finance from production management positions. Others work in finance in other industries before moving into film. A good route in is to start as a cashier and work your way up to being a production accountant and then step up to finance controller.

Apprenticeships are jobs with training. They’re a great opportunity to earn while you learn. In the past, it has been challenging to find jobs as an apprentice within production companies, although there are now some employers offering assistant accountant apprenticeships tailored for working in film and TV. It might be worth looking for an apprenticeship as a junior production manager, accountant or book-keeper in a related industry. You can then transfer into film and TV drama at a later point if you keep up your interest and develop your contacts.

Company

The best way to become a Financial Controller is to gain experience in finance and accounting roles. This can be done by studying at university to gain a degree in accounting or finance, or completing a professional accounting qualification such as CPA or CA. You can also gain experience through working in roles such as a Bookkeeper, Accountant, or Finance Officer.

In short, it takes strong analytical abilities, excellent accounting knowledge, good leadership and communication skills, and proficient use of financial software. Soft skills such as attention to detail, organisation skills, problem-solving skills, and time management skills are also important.

 

Production Accountant
Banking Finance Insurance

Clerical or OrganisingAnalytic or ScientificSkill Level 5Skill Level 6

Production accountants do all the things accountants do, but they do it on film locations amidst the buzz and creativity of making a movie. They calculate finances, work out the cost of a production, talk to the completion guarantor (an insurance policy to make sure the film is delivered on time and on budget) and control the cash flow, or spending.

In pre-production, production accountants help the producers and production managers prepare budgets and estimated final cost reports. During production, they oversee all payments, manage payroll and provide daily or weekly cost reports. They also produce cost forecasts to evaluate the impact of any production changes.

Production accountants prepare a statement of account showing all income and expenditure for the producer or production company and the financiers. They may also have to arrange an independent audit. Depending on how the film is financed, they may also have to deal with bank finance and completion guarantors.

On larger productions, production accountants may work with finance controllers, who are often permanently employed by studios and broadcasters. Production accountants are usually freelancers.

ANZSCO ID: 221111

Knowledge, skills and attributes

  • Accountancy: keep books meticulously, know Inland Revenue regulations and insurance

  • Using finance software: be able to use Movie Magic Budgeting or other budgeting packages

  • Knowledge of film production: have a thorough understanding of how film dramas are made and a love of the industry

  • Communication: be able to listen to and be understood by everyone from producers, financiers, finance controllers and cashiers

  • Discretion: be able to maintain confidences

The Production Accountant: Behind the Scenes with Helen Maddison | Holes
https://youtu.be/FQ6gEwQss60

 

 


Duties and Tasks

  • Accountancy: keep books meticulously, know Inland Revenue regulations and insurance

  • Using finance software: be able to use Movie Magic Budgeting or other budgeting packages

  • Knowledge of film production: have a thorough understanding of how film dramas are made and a love of the industry

  • Communication: be able to listen to and be understood by everyone from producers, financiers, finance controllers and cashiers

  • Discretion: be able to maintain confidences


Working conditions

If the production has a finance controller, the production accountant works closely with him or her. If it doesn’t, then the production accountant heads up a team that may comprise a key assistant accountant, an assistant accountant and an accounts trainee or cashier.


Tools and technologies

The usual packages for computers to keep all the accounts for film work but there is also specific packages like

1. Movie Magic Budgeting

2. Celtx

3. Showbiz Budgeting

4. Hot Budget

5. Jungle Software

6. Google Sheets (Free Film Budgeting Templates)

Education and training/entrance requirements

Some production accountants have a degree in accounting but by no means all. Some get into the accounts department having worked in other roles in the industry. A good route in is to start as a cashier and work your way up to an assistant accountant role before becoming the production accountant.

Apprenticeships are jobs with training. They’re a great opportunity to earn while you learn. In the past, it has been challenging to find jobs as an apprentice within production companies, although there are now some employers offering assistant accountant apprenticeships tailored for working in film and TV. It might be worth looking for an apprenticeship as a junior production manager, accountant or book-keeper in a related industry. You can then transfer into film and TV drama at a later point if you keep up your interest and develop your contacts.

A degree in accountancy will stand you in good stead. It’s not essential. Some people get qualified as bookkeepers then work their way up without a degree.


Employment Opportunities

You might like to be a production accountant in TV. Broadcasters like the ABC and SBS will take on production accountants in staff roles, which might suit some better than the freelance life which is more typical for production accountants in film and TV drama.

Or you might want to take another role within film. Production accountants go on to become line producers and financial controllers.

Accountant

Bank Officer

Actuary

Auditor

Insurance Agent

Valuer

Accounts Clerk

Bookkeeper

Insurance Consultant

Insurance Claims Investigator

Economist

Commodities Trader

Debt Collector

Bank Officer

Actuary

Auditor

Accountant

Insurance Agent

Valuer

Accounts Clerk

Bookkeeper

Insurance Consultant

Insurance Claims Investigator

Economist

Commodities Trader

Debt Collector

Bank Officer

Actuary

Auditor

Accountant

Insurance Agent

Valuer

Accounts Clerk

Bookkeeper

Insurance Consultant

Insurance Claims Investigator

Economist

Commodities Trader

Debt Collector

Bank Officer

Actuary

Auditor

Insurance Agent

Valuer

Accounts Clerk

Bookkeeper

Insurance Consultant

Insurance Claims Investigator

Economist

Commodities Trader

Debt Collector

Bank Officer

Actuary

Auditor

Accountant

Insurance Agent

Valuer

Accounts Clerk

Bookkeeper

Insurance Consultant

Insurance Claims Investigator

Economist

Commodities Trader

Debt Collector

Bank Officer

Actuary

Auditor

Accountant

Insurance Agent

Valuer

Accounts Clerk

Bookkeeper

Insurance Consultant

Insurance Claims Investigator

Economist

Commodities Trader

Debt Collector

Bank Officer

Actuary

Auditor

Accountant

Insurance Agent

Valuer

Accounts Clerk

Bookkeeper

Insurance Consultant

Insurance Claims Investigator

Economist

Commodities TraderDebt Collector

Bank Officer

Actuary

Auditor

Accountant

Insurance Agent

Valuer

Accounts Clerk

Bookkeeper

Insurance Consultant

Insurance Claims Investigator

Economist

Commodities Trader

Debt Collector

Bank Officer

Actuary

Auditor

Accountant

Insurance Agent

Valuer

Accounts Clerk

Bookkeeper

Insurance Consultant

Insurance Claims Investigator

Economist

Commodities Trader

Debt Collector

Bank Officer

Actuary

Auditor

Accountant

Insurance Agent

Valuer

Accounts Clerk

Bookkeeper

Insurance Consultant

Insurance Claims Investigator

Economist

Commodities Trader

Debt Collector

Bank Officer

Actuary

Auditor

Accountant

Insurance Agent

Valuer

Accounts Clerk

Bookkeeper

Insurance Consultant

Insurance Claims Investigator

Economist

Commodities Trader

Debt Collector

Bank Officer

Actuary

Auditor

Accountant

Insurance Agent

Valuer

Accounts Clerk

Bookkeeper

Insurance Consultant

Insurance Claims Investigator

Economist

Commodities Trader

Debt Collector

Bank Officer

Actuary

Auditor

Accountant

Insurance Agent

Valuer

Accounts Clerk

Bookkeeper

Insurance Consultant

Insurance Claims Investigator

Economist

Commodities Trader

Debt Collector

Bank Officer

Actuary

Auditor

Accountant

Insurance Agent

Valuer

Accounts Clerk

Bookkeeper

Insurance Consultant

Insurance Claims Investigator

Economist

Commodities Trader

Debt Collector

Bank Officer

Actuary

Auditor

Accountant

Insurance Agent

Valuer

Accounts Clerk

Bookkeeper

Insurance Consultant

Insurance Claims Investigator

Economist

Commodities Trader

Debt Collector