Mechanic

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Bicycle mechanic
Brake mechanic
Heavy vehicle motor mechanic
Light engine mechanic

Light vehicle motor mechanic
Mechanic Assistant

 

Related Jobs or Working with these Jobs

 

Practical or MechanicalSkill Level 2Skill Level 3

 

Motor Mechanic (General)

Automotive mechanics work on the mechanical parts of motor vehicles, including the engine, transmission and suspension systems. They fix, maintain, reassemble, restore and overhaul these Future Growth Static components and also talk to the vehicles' owner about issues they may be having. Common tasks might include the testing and repairing of electrical lighting systems, the replacement of damaged parts in the engine, or the inspection of vehicles in order to render them safe for the road. Automotive mechanics work right across the state, in service stations, vehicle dealerships, for public authorities such as local governments or defence, transport firms, organisations with fleets of vehicles that need to be maintained and for themselves in their own businesses.

UnderhoodANZSCO description: Maintains, tests and repairs petrol engines and the mechanical parts of lightweight motor vehicles such as transmissions, suspension, steering and brakes. Registration or licensing may be required.

Alternative names:
Automotive Light Mechanic, Automotive Mechanic, Service Technician,

Specialisations:
Automatic Transmission Mechanic, Automotive Airconditioning Fitter, Automotive Airconditioning Mechanic, Brake Mechanic, Ground Support Equipment Fitter (Air Force), Vehicle Mechanic (Army)

Knowledge, skills and attributes

An automotive mechanic needs:

  • the ability to work well with manual hand tools

  • problem-solving skills

  • good vision and hearing

  • to hold a current drivers license

  • technical aptitude

Working conditions

Automotive mechanics work mainly in garages, workshops and other areas where vehicles are serviced, repaired or maintained. They work with oils, petrol, greases and other chemical products which can cause skin irritation. Mechanics should also be physically fit so they can lift and move heavy tools or machinery. Work areas can quickly become messy and dirty.

Tools and technologies

Automotive mechanics work mainly with tools and devices used to maintain and repair automotive engines and parts. Safety precautions must always be taken when working with certain machines and devices in the industry, such as when welding. Other tools used in the industry may include spanners, precision measuring devices and spray painting equipment.

Education and training/entrance requirements

To become an automotive mechanic, you usually have to complete an apprenticeship in automotive technician (light). The apprenticeship usually takes 42 to 48 months to complete, and is available as a school-based apprenticeship.

To work as an automotive mechanic in Australia, you will need to acquire a Motor Vehicle Repairer's Certificate, or work under the supervision of someone who holds a current certificate.

A National Police Certificate is required to gain a Motor Vehicle Repairer's Certificate.

 

 

Light Vehicle Motor Mechanic
Transport and Travel

Practical or MechanicalSkill Level 2Skill Level 3

Light vehicle motor mechanics service, repair and overhaul the mechanical parts of motor vehicles such as the engine, the transmission (clutch, gear box and differential), and the suspension systems (springs, Future Growth Static steering, brakes, wheels and tyres).

Specialisations:

Light vehicle motor mechanics may specialise as Automotive Air Conditioning Fitters or Brake Mechanics. They may also specialise as breakdown service patrol officers who give emergency mechanical assistance to members of an automobile association.

Motorcycle Mechanic

A motorcycle mechanic diagnoses faults and performs necessary repairs to motorcycles.

Knowledge, skills and attributes Oil change

  • enjoy practical and manual activities
  • able to work with hand tools
  • good at technical activities
  • problem-solving skills
  • able to cope with the physical demands of the job
  • normal eyesight and hearing
  • drivers licence essential.

Duties and Tasks

Light vehicle motor mechanics may perform the following tasks:

  • discuss problems with car drivers or vehicle operators to discover faults
  • listen to engines, fit and operate special test equipment and test-drive vehicles
  • repair or replace worn or faulty parts by removing assemblies such as engines, transmissions, differentials or steering gear; dismantling them and checking parts, referring to manuals as necessary
  • reassemble, test, clean and adjust repaired or replaced parts or assemblies, using various instruments to make sure they are working properly and putting them back into the vehicle
  • tune engines using special electronic equipment and make fine adjustments (to carburettors, for example) for smoother running
  • carry out minor body repairs and minor trim repairs
  • diagnose, repair and replace engine management and fuel injection components
  • use oxy, electric, TIG and MIG welders
  • test and repair electrical systems such as lighting, instrumentation, ignition and electronic fuel injection
  • inspect vehicles and issue roadworthiness certificates or list the work required before a certificate can be issued.


Working conditions

Light vehicle motor mechanics work mainly in workshops and wear protective clothing. They need to keep up with changes in motor industry technology.


Due to advances in automotive technology, most vehicles now contain electronic controls and computers. As a result, knowledge in this area has become essential for light vehicle motor mechanics and they are becoming more specialised in their areas of work.



Heavy vehicle motor mechanic
Transport and Travel

 

Practical or MechanicalSkill Level 2Skill Level 3

Heavy vehicle motor mechanics repair, maintain and test heavy vehicles, other engines and related mechanical components. Future Growth Static

Knowledge, skills and attributes

  • enjoy practical and manual activities
  • mechanical aptitude
  • good at mathematics
  • able to cope with the physical demands of the job.



Duties and Tasks

Heavy vehicle motor mechanics may perform the following tasks:

  • diagnose, overhaul, repair, tune, maintain and test diesel, petrol and gas-powered vehicles, including trucks; buses; bulldozers and other earthmoving equipment; tractors; stationary engines (generators, pumps, compressors and drilling rigs, for example); and agricultural machinery
  • detect mechanical and electrical faults by using instruments that check charging and starting circuitry; batteries; ignition and ignition timing; fuel injection systems and speed control; cylinder compression; engine condition; braking efficiency; and wheel balance and alignment
  • repair and maintain the hydraulic components of diesel, petrol and gas engines that are used to power attachments such as hoists, booms, scrapers, buckets and augers
  • use oxy, electric, TIG and MIG welding, hand fitting or machining processes to replace or repair faulty parts.

Working conditions

Heavy vehicle motor mechanics may have to work in country areas when repairing agricultural, earthmoving and heavy transport machinery.

Brake Mechanic
Transport and Travel

Practical or MechanicalSkill Level 2Skill Level 3

Brake mechanics diagnose faults and repair, replace or overhaul and test the parts of disc, drum or power brake systems used on all types of motor vehicles. Future Growth Static

Specialisations:

Brake mechanics may specialise in light or heavy vehicles. Some brake mechanics specialise in compressed air brake systems used by trucks, buses and semi-trailers.

 

Knowledge, skills and attributes

  • enjoy practical and manual work
  • mechanical aptitude
  • able to work accurately.



Duties and Tasks

Brake mechanics may perform the following tasks:Bicycle brake

  • work out faults in brake systems by talking to the vehicle operator and driving the vehicle, noting its performance, or by reading data from the vehicle's computer control system
  • diagnose and correct anti-lock braking faults
  • examine brake units, including steel and flex hoses and handbrake cables, for wear, damage or possible failure, and repair or replace as required
  • measure brake drums and disc rotors to determine if wear or finished size is excessive
  • test brake units to make sure outputs are to the specified level (this includes electronics now widely used on late model vehicles and trailer/caravan brakes)
  • repair or replace leaky brake cylinders
  • attach new linings to brake shoes by bonding or riveting (this is a separate semi-skilled operation in some repair shops)
  • machine discs and drum brakes where indicated
  • fit wheel onto hub and tighten wheel fixings to specified torque
  • ensure brake systems are filled with correct brake fluid and are functioning correctly
  • bleed the hydraulic brake system.



 

Light Engine Mechanic
Transport and Travel

Practical or MechanicalSkill Level 2Skill Level 3

Light engine mechanics test, service and repair small engines and parts in motorcycles, boats and other small engine-powered equipment such as chainsaws, brush-cutters, lawnmowers, pumps and Future Growth Static stationary engines.

Specialisations:

Lawnmower Mechanic
A lawnmower mechanic diagnoses faults and performs necessary repairs on lawnmowers and related equipment.

Outboard Motor Mechanic
An outboard motor mechanic diagnoses faults and performs necessary repairs on boat engines.

Knowledge, skills and attributes

  • enjoy practical and manual work
  • able to cope with the physical demands of the job
  • normal eyesight and hearing
  • good at technical activities
  • problem-solving skills
  • able to read and interpret technical information from service manuals
  • no skin allergies or reactions to grease, oil or petrol.

 

Duties and Tasks

Light engine mechanics may perform the following tasks: Automechanic

  • work out mechanical and electrical faults through discussion with users, listening to engines and using specialised testing equipment
  • take apart faulty engine assemblies, check parts using precision measuring equipment and refer to workshop manuals
  • clean, lubricate and tune engines to ensure that they run properly
  • repair damaged or faulty parts by straightening, welding, machining or hand-making new metal parts
  • repair and adjust electrical faults
  • remove small dents in panels, spray paint and do minor trim repairs
  • set up and water-test outboard motors.


Working conditions

Light engine mechanics work in workshops and garages. Protective clothing is usually worn.

bicycle mechanic
Transport and Travel

Practical or MechanicalSkill Level 1

As a bicycle or bike mechanic, you would build, repair and service all kinds of bicycles. Bicycle Mechanics assemble bicycles, service new and used bicycles, repair faults and provide technical product advice to customers.  Future Growth Static

Knowledge, skills and attributes   

To become a bicycle mechanic, you would need:

  • A keen interest in cycling and bikes
  • A recognised cycle mechanic qualification or equivalent work experience
  • Strong manual skills
  • Knowledge of a wide range of cycling equipment
  • The ability to recognise faulty equipment and to carry out maintenance and repairs.   
  • Mechanical Aptitude
  • Physically Fit and Capable of Performing Manual Work
  • Problem Solving and Attention to Detail
  • Strong Communication     

 

Best Disposable Gloves for Bike Maintenance/Repair
https://youtu.be/ibVZTyaqrOs

 

Duties and Tasks

As a bicycle mechanic you might:

  • Build a bike to a customer’s specification
  • Identify problems with a bike and discuss solutions with the customer
  • Estimate the cost of repairs and give quotes
  • Carry out service and safety checks
  • Clean, degrease, lubricate or replace bike parts
  • Order bike parts
  • Liaising with suppliers and dealers.
  • Assemble bicycles for sale
  • Examine and repair bicycles
  • Maintain stock levels and shop presentation
  • Service new and used bicycles
  • Share product and technical expertise with customers

Some bike mechanics might get the opportunity to attend cycling events as part of their job. Race events and charity bike rides often need bike mechanics to provide repairs and technical support.

Working conditions

You would work a standard number of hours in a week, which may include weekends.

You could work in a variety of businesses, including retailers, wholesalers, suppliers, manufacturers, race teams and tour companies. You will usually work indoors in a workshop, but may travel if you work for a race team or tour company. The work can be quite physically demanding and you would be on your feet a lot of the time.

Tools and technologies

Bike mechanics use various tools and cleaning chemicals. You may need to wear protective clothing such as overalls and eye protection.

Education and training/entrance requirements

You can work as a bicycle mechanic without formal qualifications. You would probably get some informal training on the job.

You can also become a bike mechanic through an apprenticeship or traineeship in Bicycle Mechanical Technology or Bicycle Workshop Operations. Entry requirements may vary, but employers generally require junior secondary school certificate or equivalent.

Cycling is increasing in popularity, and bicycles are becoming increasing complex and costly. As a result, more opportunities are becoming available, but employers often seek trained and qualified employees.

Employment may be on a full-time or part-time basis and may include seasonal work.

 

Mechanic's Assistant
Transport and Travel

Practical or MechanicalClerical or OrganisingSkill Level 1Skill Level 2Skill Level 3

Mechanics' Assistants assist Motor Mechanics to replace and repair worn and defective parts, re-assemble mechanical components, change oil and filters, and perform other routine mechanical tasks. Future Growth StaticMechanic assistants provide support to lead mechanics working in automotive repair shops by directly helping with repair- and maintenance-related tasks. This role provides an excellent starting point for new mechanics to gain familiarity with repair and maintenance processes and best practices while working directly under the supervision of more experienced professionals.

As mechanic assistants gain knowledge and expertise, they can take on more complex tasks within the shop. They may begin with simple duties including oil and tyre changes before moving on to replacing parts like hoses and belts or directly aiding in vehicle inspections and the diagnosis of performance issues.

ANZSCO ID: 899916

Alternative names: Apprentice Motor Mechanic

Specialisations: Lube Attendant

Knowledge, skills and attributes      

  • Knowledge of vehicle repair.
  • Excellent mechanical skills.
  • Ability to follow instructions.
  • Ability to use power and hand tools.
  • Excellent analytical and problem-solving skills.
  • Ability to read service and repair manuals.
  • Ability to complete assigned tasks in a timely fashion.  
  • Must be able to bend, stretch, kneel, and squat to perform repairs and inspections.
  • Must be able to work safely in a noisy area with many odours present.
  • Must be able to lift 20K at a time.  

Modelling work
(Source: ZipRecruiter)

Duties and Tasks

Assists mechanics to:

  • Detect and diagnose faults in engines and parts.
  • Dismantle and remove engine assemblies, transmissions, steering mechanisms and other components, and check parts.
  • Repair and replace worn and defective parts and reassemble mechanical components, and refer to service manuals as needed.
  • Perform scheduled maintenance services such as oil changes, lubrications and engine tune-ups to achieve smoother running of vehicles and ensure compliance with pollution regulations.
  • Reassemble engines and parts after being repaired.
  • Test and adjust mechanical parts after being repaired for proper performance, diagnose and test parts with the assistance of computers.

Support Lead Mechanics

Many of the core duties of a mechanic assistant involve providing direct or indirect support to lead mechanics. They may work on projects under the lead mechanic’s supervision or may help out by ensuring that the lead mechanic has ready access to the tools and parts they need to finish repair and maintenance activities. As mechanic assistants gain familiarity with processes and practices, they may ask questions to clarify the lead mechanic’s activities or provide information related to their own tasks.

Perform Preventive Maintenance Tasks

In many cases, mechanic assistants conduct routine maintenance activities that don’t require a high level of expertise or specialization. A mechanic assistant may change a vehicle’s oil, rotate tires, flush and replace fluids, and change bulbs. Early in their career, the mechanic assistant may perform these tasks under the direct supervision of a lead or more experienced mechanic, but they tend to act with more autonomy as they demonstrate their knowledge.

Repair and Replace Automotive Parts

Mechanic assistants repair and replace parts in cars or trucks, including belts and tubes that have worn out or could soon fail. These replacements generally don’t require a high level of technical knowledge, but a mechanic assistant may also make more advanced repairs or replacements under the supervision of lead mechanics, such as swapping out engine components or transmissions.

Provide Diagnostic Support

Experienced mechanic assistants provide diagnostic support for lead and senior mechanics. As they begin their career, the mechanic assistant learns about methods for diagnosing vehicle performance issues and eventually gains a thorough knowledge of common diagnostic tests and indicators. Additionally, the mechanic assistant may work with diagnostic tools and provide reports and data to the lead mechanic to assist with repairs.

Maintain Customer and Vehicle Records

Mechanic assistants provide support throughout the shop by maintaining customer and vehicle records, working with printed copies of service records and computerized data. Mechanic assistants frequently create new customer records, gather information related to the vehicle, check registration and insurance information, and ensure that customer and vehicle information remains up to date and reflects recent repair and maintenance activities.

Support Shop Cleanliness and Safety

Finally, mechanic assistants maintain workspaces and promote shop safety by cleaning work areas and removing hazardous materials such as oil, gasoline, or other fluids. The mechanic assistant follows established procedures for safe disposal of motor oil, tyres, and other vehicle fluids. They may also conduct periodic checks of equipment and work areas to ensure that they are free of clutter and dangerous materials like broken glass.

 

 

Working conditions

They usually work in garages that are indoors. Usually starting work at 7am and finishing at 4pm 5 days a week.

Automotive mechanic assistants work mainly in garages, workshops and other areas where vehicles are serviced, repaired or maintained. They work with oils, petrol, greases and other chemical products which can cause skin irritation. Mechanics should also be physically fit so they can lift and move heavy tools or machinery. Work areas can quickly become messy and dirty. This is still a male dominated industry with 96.9%male and 2.5%female.

Tools and technologies

Automotive mechanics work mainly with tools and devices used to maintain and repair automotive engines and parts. Safety precautions must always be taken when working with certain machines and devices in the industry, such as when welding. Other tools used in the industry may include spanners, precision measuring devices and spray painting equipment.

Education and training/entrance requirements

You can work as a Mechanic's Assistant without formal qualifications. Some on the job training may be provided. A Vocational Education and Training (VET) course in an automotive or mechanical field might be helpful.


Did You Know?

Electric Cars - Cars of the Future?

Imagine a time in the future when all the cars will run on electricity. When will it happen? Why has it not happened yet?
It has!
The first battery operated car was the Baker Electric car, which was manufactured from 1899 - 1915. For a long period after gasoline-powered cars gained popularity, battery-powered automobiles continued to be made in the U.S.

Battery-powered cars had the advantages of a quiet ride and no exhaust emissions, as well as not requiring cranking to start.
The Baker Electric was reputedly easy to drive, and could cruise a distance of 80 kilometres when fully charged, reaching a top speed of 40km/h.

Electric Car
(Source:
Wikimedia Commons)

Mechanic

Taxi Driver

Autoelectrician

Truck Driver

Travel Agent

Air Traffic Controller

Furniture Removalist

Bus Driver

Waterside Worker

Forklift Operator

Flight Attendant

Transport Economist

Panel Beater

Pilot

Crane Operator

Coxswain

Logging Truck Driver

Livestock Transport Driver

Mobile Plant Operator

Chauffeur

Flying Instructor

Delivery Driver

Driving Instructor

Transport Company Manager

Ship's Master

Car Detailer

Caravan Park & Camping Ground Manager

Supply, Distribution & Procurement Manager

Helicopter Pilot

Mechanic

Taxi Driver

Autoelectrician

Truck Driver

Travel Agent

Air Traffic Controller

Furniture Removalist

Bus Driver

Waterside Worker

Forklift Operator

Flight Attendant

Transport Economist

Panel Beater

Pilot

Crane Operator

Coxswain

Logging Truck Driver

Livestock Transport Driver

Mobile Plant Operator

Chauffeur

Flying Instructor

Delivery Driver

Driving Instructor

Transport Company Manager

Ship's Master

Car Detailer

Caravan Park & Camping Ground Manager

Supply, Distribution & Procurement Manager

Helicopter Pilot

Mechanic

Taxi Driver

Autoelectrician

Truck Driver

Travel Agent

Air Traffic Controller

Furniture Removalist

Bus Driver

Waterside Worker

Forklift Operator

Flight Attendant

Transport Economist

Panel Beater

Pilot

Crane Operator

Coxswain

Logging Truck Driver

Livestock Transport Driver

Mobile Plant Operator

Chauffeur

Flying Instructor

Delivery Driver

Driving Instructor

Transport Company Manager

Ship's Master

Car Detailer

Caravan Park & Camping Ground Manager

Supply, Distribution & Procurement Manager

Helicopter Pilot

Armoured Car Escort

Horse Float Driver

Overload Pilot Operator

Logistics Analyst

Tow Truck Driver