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Production Assistant (Coffee Roasting Assistant)
Production Manager (Coffee Head Roaster)
Coffee Roaster
Coffee Taster/Cupper
Mechanical & Roaster Technician
Green Coffee Buyer

 

Related Jobs or Working with these Jobs

 

Service or PersuadingArtistic or CreativePractical or MechanicalSkill Level 1Skill Level 2

Baristas specialise in making coffee, as well as tea and a range of other beverages. This has become a very ‘artistic’ occupation with many baristas competing to perfect the best tasting, and looking, cup of Future Growth Strong coffee.

Baristas may take customers' orders, prepare and serve drinks, and provide information to customers about the content or preparation of their order. They also clean the beverage and food-making equipment, collect payment from and give change to customers, and monitor the amount of stock. Baristas work in cafes and restaurants across Australia and the world.

ANZSCO ID: 431112

Knowledge, skills and attributes

A barista needs to have:Art

  • a love of coffee and being in the public eye

  • a friendly and personable demeanour

  • the stamina to remain on their feet for extended periods

  • to ability to perform detailed work quickly and safely

  • the ability to work in stressful conditions

  • the commitment to follow health and safety regulations.

Working conditions

Baristas work mostly in cafés and coffee shops, but may also work in restaurants, bars, or other food service establishments. Their workplaces are usually busy and may be noisy. They usually work shifts, which includes early mornings, late nights, weekends and public holidays.

Tools and technologies

Baristas need to be able to operate coffee machines, as well as food preparation equipment such as sandwich makers. They are often also required to use cash registers, and EFTPOS and credit card machines.

Barista working

Education and training/entrance requirements

It is possible to work as a barista without any formal qualifications and get training on the job. However, entry into this occupation may be improved by obtaining a qualification in hospitality or a specialist barista training course.

The Certificate II and III in Hospitality are offered at TAFE Colleges and other registered training organisations throughout Australia.

It is also possible to complete a traineeship in hospitality – food and beverage. The traineeship usually takes 24 months to complete. ​

Apprenticeships and traineeships

As an apprentice or trainee, you enter into a formal training contract with an employer. You spend most of your time working and learning practical skills on the job and you spend some time undertaking structured training with a registered training provider of your choice. They will assess your skills and when you are competent in all areas, you will be awarded a nationally recognised qualification.

If you are still at school you can access an apprenticeship through your school. You generally start your school based apprenticeship by attending school three days a week, spending one day at a registered training organisation and one day at work. Talk to your school's VET Co-ordinator to start your training now through VET in Schools. If you get a full-time apprenticeship you can apply to leave school before reaching the school leaving age.

If you are no longer at school you can apply for an apprenticeship or traineeship and get paid while you learn and work.

Did You Know?


The word barista is an Italian word, and in Italy, a barista is a male or female "bartender", who typically works behind a counter, serving hot drinks (such as espresso), cold alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverages, and snacks.

The native plural in English is baristas, while in Italian the plural is baristi for masculine or mixed sex (baristi: "barmen", "bartenders") or bariste for feminine (bariste: "barmaids").

While the title is not regulated, most coffee shops use the title to describe the preparer of coffee and operator of an espresso machine.

Good espresso-making is essential to a barista's role.

Latte art is a visible sign of a trained barista and well-frothed milk.

Pouring

Baristas generally operate a commercial espresso machine, and their role is preparing and pulling the shot; the degree to which this is automated or done manually varies significantly, ranging from push-button operation to an involved manual process. Espresso is a notoriously finicky beverage, and good manual espresso making is considered a skilled task. Further, preparation of other beverages, particularly milk-based drinks such as cappuccinos and lattes, but also non-espresso coffee such as drip or press pot, requires additional work and skill for effective frothing, pouring and most often latte art.

The barista usually has been trained to operate the machine and to prepare the coffee based on the guidelines of the roaster or shop owner, while more experienced baristas may have discretion to vary preparation or experiment.

To make the coffee well, there is a series of steps needing attention, including grinding the beans, extracting the coffee, frothing the milk and pouring.

Beyond the preparation of espresso and other beverages and general customer service, skilled baristas acquire knowledge of the entire process of coffee to effectively prepare a desired cup of coffee, including maintenance and programming of the machine, grinding methods, roasting, and coffee plant cultivation, similar to how a sommelier is familiar with the entire process of wine making and consumption. A barista can acquire these skills by attending training classes, but they are more commonly learned on the job.

World Barista Championship

Formal barista competitions originated in Norway,and today the most prestigious is the World Barista Championships, held annually at varied international locations. Baristas worldwide compete, though they must first compete in a competition held in their own country to qualify to enter in the WBC

 

Production Assistant
Baker

Practical or MechanicalSkill Level 1Skill Level 2

The Production Assistant (sometimes listed as Roasting Assistant) is a position that works under and reports directly to the Production Manager, who may also be the Head Roaster. Production Assistant is Future Growth Strong a great way to learn every aspect of the coffee industry. You will have responsibilities in the full production process, from inception to shipping.

Duties and Tasks

  • Preparing packaging materials for shipping
  • Labeling of bags and boxes
  • Order fulfillment for coffee orders
  • Ensuring all orders are filled, packed and shipped
  • Communicating inventory levels with the Production Manager
  • Performing daily, weekly, and monthly maintenance and cleaning of production equipment

Education and training/entrance requirements

There are multiple levels for production associate, from entry-level to more advanced positions. The more advanced positions may require 2 – 3 years of production experience in a similar field.

Coffee Warehouse
(Source: Perfect Daily Grind)

Production Manager
Baker


Practical or MechanicalClerical or OrganisingSkill Level 2Skill Level 3

Larger coffee roasting companies will have a Production Manager, sometimes referred to as the Plant Manager or Roasting & Packaging Coordinator.

The Production Manager must be experienced in managing the workflow in a manufacturing environment. There is a high level of responsibility in maintaining communications between the coffee roaster, packaging operators, shipping and customer service. Future Growth Strong

Knowledge, skills and attributes

  • Ability to operate multiple coffee and tea packaging machines

  • Supporting the green coffee handling and roasting processes

  • Daily operation of the all packaging equipment types

  • Manage production efficiency and troubleshooting equipment failures

  • Ensuring Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP) are maintained


Education and training/entrance requirements

For a Production Manager position, employers are looking for individuals with several years of management and operating experience. A background in food processing experience and GMP knowledge is also preferred.

Coffee Roaster
Baker

Practical or Mechanical
Skill Level 1Skill Level 2


A coffee roaster is an expert on all aspects of coffee production. The roasting of the coffee is just one part of this position’s responsibility. From assisting the buyer in the acquisition of green coffee to the Future Growth Strong blending and packaging, a coffee roaster will manage quality control through each step of the process.

Mid-size to larger coffee roasting businesses will have an experienced Lead or Head Roaster. The lead roasters’ sphere of responsibility starts with the cupping table and follows each step of the production process.

As one moves up in their coffee roasting career, they may graduate to Head Roaster and eventually earn Master Roaster status.

Knowledge, skills and attributes Roaster

  • Experience with a coffee roasting machine including removing moisture from coffee beans, weighing batches of coffee beans in a scale hopper and feeding the beans into the roasting oven.
  • Maintaining proper temperature by observing the roaster thermometer and adjusting controls properly.
  • Ability to estimate roasting time by observing the color of roasting coffee beans in the roasting oven.
  • Properly discharges the roasted beans to the cooling tray.
  • Records roasting amounts, types, and blends of roasted coffee beans.



Duties and Tasks

  • Responsible to maintain inventory levels for the coffee business, which could include online, retail and wholesale.
  • Manage the training of staff on production operations, including roasting, stamping, head sealing, weighing and shipping.
  • Tracking and maintaining inventory levels for both green and roasted coffee.
  • Manage the roasting schedule.
  • Serve as the in-house coffee expert and resource for customer coffee questions.
  • Responsible for roasting samples and hosting cuppings related to the green coffee buying program.
  • Will work with the Operations Team in roasting experiments, improving inventory accuracy and forecasting, along with consistency in roasting profiles.

 

Education and training/entrance requirements

Many coffee roasting companies will provide training programs where you can gain experience with the roasting process and equipment. Typically, trainees will cut their teeth on test batches, which allow them to learn how to monitor temperature, roasting time, color and roast levels for the coffee beans.

Coffee Taster/Cupper
Baker

Analytic or ScientificSkill Level 1

A professional coffee taster is able to rate and describe the coffee they are tasting through a method that enables them to compare a variety of coffee samples side by side. Future Growth Strong

Knowledge, skills and attributes

A professional coffee taster, or cupper, must possess a number of skills:

  • The ability to assess coffee quality objectively

  • Identify, evaluate and articulate the attributes of the coffee

  • Detect any defects in the coffee

  • Communicate coffee characteristics using accepted industry terminology

Did You Know?

Australian Coffee

Today, coffee is grown mostly in the far eastern part of the country. Two important areas are the Atherton Tablelands in northern Queensland outside of Cairns, with about 30 large growers on over 700 ha, and in northern New South Wales (NSW) just south of the Queensland border, where there are around 170 growers on 500 ha. Australian coffee is a rule breaker as far as elevation is concerned. Not only is the country outside the tropics, but coffee is typically grown at 200-400 metres, not infrequently lower, and rarely much above 900 metres.

Despite the low elevations, Australia grows arabica almost exclusively. The typica variety is grown, but also catuai, Mundo Novo (hybrid of bourbon and typica), and especially Kenyan varieties more suited to the drier Australian climate such as K7 and SL6.

Coffee is processed every which-way: some wet processing, some semi-washed (pulped natural), some dry processed (full natural), and a unique method developed by the Mountain Top Coffee Company called “double pass.” This is where a full natural process bean (dried on the tree) is rehydrated before being pulped.

Australia currently produces 200 to 600 tons of coffee annually, half of which is exported, an amount so low it does not even get listed in the International Coffee Organization’s production statistics. It’s rarely seen in the United States, but there has been considerable investment in the specialty coffee industry in Australia along with increasing market presence.

(Source: Coffee Habitat)

Mechanical & Roaster Technician
Baker


Clerical or OrganisingSkill Level 1Skill Level 2

The Mechanical Technician is responsible for all roasting, packaging, brewing, and dispensing equipment. From in-house to in-field calls, the life of a mechanical technician is fast-paced. If you’re mechanically inclined and like a work environment where every day is different, then a mechanical  technician may be the perfect fit. Good communication skills are also necessary. A mechanical tech will deal directly with the customer when it comes to equipment installations, emergency service, maintenance, and equipment exchanges. Future Growth Strong

Larger coffee equipment companies will have a Roaster Technician position. There may be multiple levels available, from entry-level I (Apprenticeship) to more advanced supervisory positions. The Roaster Tech is involved in the assembly and maintenance of coffee roasting machines. This requires a knowledge of electro-mechanical assembly and gas system assembly and testing.

Knowledge, skills and attributes

  • Ability to read fabrication and electrical schematics/drawings
  • Knowledge of roaster operation and assembly
  • Document creation for the bill of materials (BOM), work instructions, etc.
  • Wire electrical and electro-mechanical assemblies and sub-assemblies
  • Testing roasters for function and build quality

Duties and Tasks

  • Proficiency with tools, machinery, electricity, and plumbing
  • Troubleshoot, repair and maintain equipment
  • Ensure proper installation and un-instillation of equipment
  • Maintain inventory of equipment and service parts


Green Coffee Buyer
Baker

Nature or RecreationAnalytic or ScientificSkill Level 3Skill Level 4Skill Level 5

Connecting farmers to customers throughout the world, coffee buyers are the link from production to consumption and the gatekeepers for quality in specialty coffee.

The job of the green coffee buyer is to determine what coffees a roasting company will purchase. Not Future Growth Strong only is a knowledge of coffee required but managing the relationships and transactions between the grower and the roaster is vital. Many people are attracted to the idea of international travel and visiting coffee producers in exotic places. However, it’s not always exciting. There will be a great deal of time spent in the home office sampling coffees, handling paperwork and coordinating the sale. To put it into perspective, consider that a coffee buyer for Starbucks will spend about 18 weeks out of the year visiting coffee growers and suppliers.

 

Green coffee buyer
(Source: Jebena Coffees)

The amount of time spent in the field depends on the amount of coffee the roaster needs to maintain production.

Knowledge, skills and attributes

A successful coffee buyer will also have the following qualifications:

  • bilingual (English, Spanish, & Portuguese among others)
  • have cupping experience
  • have roasting experience
  • strong communication skills
  • experience in trade & business ( a business degree is a plus)
  • ability to withstand high altitudes
  • international travel experience

Duties and Tasks

A coffee buyer needs to be business savvy, making daily decisions on:

  • managing relationships with suppliers
  • the quality of the coffee being purchased
  • the price of the coffee and purchasing contracts
  • managing coffee inventory
  • coffee storage and transport
  • shipping and processing protocol
  • managing quality control through the process

Education and training/entrance requirements

There are not a lot of education programs available for becoming a coffee buyer. Most buyers have started in the coffee industry as baristas in a local coffee shop, learning as much as they could about the industry. However, a business degree is a plus.

Did You Know?

Green Coffee Buyers have a palate as distinguished as a sommelier and can keenly identify coffee quality via cupping, or systematic tasting of brewed coffees. Through cupping, the coffee taster can assess a coffee's score and determine whether it is specialty grade quality, make decisions on which coffees they will include in their offerings, and often develop tasting notes and descriptions for the coffee on its final packaging. The green coffee buyer has a large role in communicating the information about a coffee to the roaster and café staff.

(Source: Jebena Coffees)

 

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Job Cluster: Food & Beverages Jobs

Food and Beverages Cluster

Materials sourced from Jobs & Skills WA [Barista; ] 
Craft Beverage Jobs

Zumbarcoffee [Roaster; ]
Higher Me [Lead Coffee Roaster; ]

JobOutlook [Barista; ] 

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Entrepreneur

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Wedding Coordinator

Hotel Motel Manager

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Pet Groomer

Picture Framer

Makeup Artist

Visual Merchandiser

Screen Printer

Signwriter

Kennel Cattery Operator

Vending Machine Servicer

Croupier

Butcher

Waiter

Florist

Hairdresser

Salesperson

Baker

Chef

Greengrocer

Home Entertainment Store Attendant

Beautician

Newsagent

Pharmacist