Industrial Designer

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Creative or ArtisticPractical or ManualScientific or AnalyticSkill Level 4Skill Level 5

Industrial designers create and produce designs for commercial, medical and industrial products. They also make models and prototypes of these designs for mass production. The products that industrial Future Growth Static designers create cover a wide range of manufactured goods, from toys and toasters to furniture and heavy machinery. Some work is carried out on the development of new products. Other work is related to updating and improving the design of existing products.

Industrial designers develop designs for a range of practical products that are used in commercial, domestic and industrial situations. They also create prototypes of these designs with a view towards mass production. They assess the design needs of their client, research and develop products, analyse the various costing, material, production and technological options for their designs, as well as bearing in mind fashion and marketing trends. They also supervise the construction of design models, and may also undertake some administrative tasks when necessary.


ANZSCO description: Plans, designs, develops and documents industrial, commercial or consumer products for manufacture with particular emphasis on ergonomic (human) factors, marketing considerations and manufacturability, and prepares designs and specifications of products for mass or batch production.

Alternative names: Product Designer

Specialisations: 3D Modeller, Ceramic Designer, Glass Designer, Textile Designer

Knowledge, skills and attributes

An industrial designer needs:

  • creativity and a love of design

  • problem-solving skills

  • a sound knowledge of maths and physics

  • strong communication skills

  • practical skills and technical ability

  • the ability to interpret and analyse data.

Duties and Tasks

Industrial designers may perform the following tasks:Sketches

  • discuss manufacturers' and clients' requirements
  • undertake research and development
  • consider factors influencing product design, such as cost, selection of materials, production methods, new technology, safety, fashion trends, ergonomics, the environment, marketing and business strategy
  • prepare presentation sketches showing style, size, shape, configuration of internal components and general appearance of products, either by hand or using a computer
  • supervise construction of models or samples of products and test them for function, quality and consumer appeal
  • estimate production costs
  • make engineering drawings and detailed diagrams of products and report these to manufacturers
  • modify designs where necessary to meet manufacturing or cost requirements.

Working conditions

Industrial designers usually work in offices, design studios or workshops. Their workspaces need to be spacious and well-lit. They work regular hours, but may be required to
work long hours and experience periods of intense pressure when deadlines must be met. Industrial designers may travel locally, interstate or overseas to view new design ideas or to attend conferences.

Industrial designers work closely with other professionals in the field, such as engineers, manufacturers, market researchers, marketing consultants, drafters and product testing staff.

They work in studios when creating and refining designs, using their hands and/or computer-aided design. They may also spend time in the field observing and researching product usage, and in manufacturing plants observing methods of production and collecting information about new materials and production processes.


Tools and technologies

Industrial designers spend a lot of time on computers, especially using computer-aided design (CAD) software, and other two or three-dimensional design programs. They use model-building equipment and materials, drawing boards, desks and art supplies for sketching, and may also use other office equipment such as telephones, faxes and photocopiers.

Education and training/entrance requirements

To become an industrial designer you usually need to complete a qualification in industrial design or a related field.

The Advanced Diploma of Industrial Design is offered at TAFE Colleges and other registered training organisations throughout Australia.

You can also complete a degree majoring in industrial design, integrated design or a related area.



Did You Know?

What is Industrial Design?
https://youtu.be/d3hJcnWKezk

 


 

Industrial Designer

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Archaeologist

Mathematician

Scientist

Forensic Scientist

Environmental Scientist

Marine Biologist

Museum Curator

Biochemist

Entomologist

Conservator

Microbiologist

Agricultural Scientist

Industrial Designer

Inventor

Geneticist

Biotechnologist

Criminologist

Botantist

Agronomist

Historian

Geologist

Soil Scientist

Immunologist

Hydrologist

Anthropologist

Cartographer

Zoologist

Geophysicist

University Lecturer

Exercise Sports Scientist

Oceanographer

Astronomer

Political Scientist

Physicist

Toxicologist

Haematologist

Medical Laboratory Technician

Robotics Engineer

Pharmacologist

Biometrician

Epidemiologist

Medical Laboratory Scientist

Virologist

Demographer

GIS Officer