Nurse Manager

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Midwifery Manager
Midwifery Unit Manager

Nursing Clinical Director

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Clerical or OrganisingAnalytic or ScientificSkill Level 5

Nurse managers oversee nursing care on a ward or unit in public or private hospitals, aged or palliative care homes, or other healthcare facilities. They supervise nursing staff to ensure nurses Future Growth Very Strong provide safe and effective nursing care to patients. They also oversee the continuous professional training and development of nurses to meet clinical standards.

Nurse managers are responsible for the smooth running of their ward,
making sure that the ward is adequately staffed and well stocked with medical supplies, including medications and equipment.

Nurse Managers manage health service units and sub-units of hospitals, aged care and community health care facilities, supervise nursing staff and financial resources to enable the provision of safe, cost effective nursing care within specified fields or for particular units, and monitor quality, clinical standards and professional development of nurses.


ANZSCO description: Manages a health service unit or sub-unit of a hospital, aged care or community health care facility, supervises nursing staff and financial resources to enable the provision of safe, cost effective nursing care within a specified field or for a particular unit, and monitors quality, clinical standards and professional development of nurses. Registration or licensing is required.

Alternative names: Charge Nurse, Nurse Supervisor, Nurse Unit Manager

Knowledge, skills and attributes

A nurse manager needs: Tablets

  • advanced knowledge and experience in nursing
  • to assume responsibility and provide leadership
  • to be able to solve problems and make decisions
  • discretion and respect for patient confidentiality
  • the ability to remain calm in stressful situations
  • excellent communication skills to liaise with other professionals and provide clear information to patients.



Duties and Tasks

  • developing, implementing and monitoring policies and objectives of nursing care as they apply to units, staff and community groups

  • coordinating the allocation of human and material resources for a health service unit such as recruitment of staff, human resource management, preparation of budgets and fiscal management

  • •monitoring and controlling the performance of nursing and support staff within the unit, and providing leadership

  • initiating studies to evaluate the effectiveness of nursing services in the unit in relation to objectives, costs and nursing care

  • promoting working relationships with community agencies and health and education providers

  • contributing to organisational objectives in relation to quality, safety and risk management

Working conditions

Nurse managers usually work regular office hours, but may be required to do shift work including weekends and public holidays, and their working times may be irregular depending on the size of the unit they supervise. They may also need to be able to provide training and organise and attend meetings with staff and upper management.

Tools and technologies

​Nurse managers regularly use computers to maintain staff records and coordinate patient care, provide reports to upper management, help to create staff rosters, and allocate resources in the nursing care unit they supervise. They may also use computers and other resources to keep up to date with current advances in nursing, consult government legislation and policies, and access professional development and training for staff.

Education and training/entrance requirements

To become a nurse manager you must first become a qualified registered nurse. You must also gain sufficient practical experience as a nurse in the area you wish to work in, and usually need to complete postgraduate study in nursing and management.

Most universities in Australia offer relevant bachelor degree courses in nursing, and postgraduate courses in nursing and management.

To work as a nurse in Australia, you must obtain professional registration with the Nursing and Midwifery Board of Australia, and hold a current Working with Children Check issued by the Working with Children Screening Unit of the Department of Community Services.

 

Did You Know?

Traits of a Successful Nurse Manager

Working as a nurse manager requires skills beyond clinical care. The job requires management skills, budgeting and business acumen and leadership qualities.

Communications and interpersonal skills are also vital. The following characteristics are common among successful nurse managers:


Effective Communication Skills – Part of being an effective leader is listening to staff and patient concerns and communicating needs. Nurse managers must be able to build solid rapports with all staff members, from the janitorial staff to head administrators, as well as patients to create cohesiveness.

Advocacy –
In some cases, nurse leaders might have to advocate for staff to ensure a safe and reasonable practice environment. In other cases, they might have to advocate for patient safety and access to quality healthcare. Nurse managers should not be afraid of using their voice and position.

Participation –
With so many administrative demands, it is important that nurse managers balance business with patient care. Nurse managers must have superior clinical skills to ensure patient safety and wellbeing.

Mentoring –
Successful nurse leaders do not micromanage their staff. They encourage, empower, mentor, and find strengths. They boost creativity and mindfulness.

Maturity –
Nurse managers do not immediately take sides in squabbles or assess blame before knowing all the facts. They don’t let simmering emotions boil over. Instead, they meet conflict and work through it.

Professionalism –
Nurse managers follow their moral compass to ensure all aspects of the profession are met with honesty and integrity. They address people with respect and do not bully.

Supportive –
They don’t set the bar for expectations unreasonably high. Instead, they use supportive encouragement to challenge employees to success. They coach and mentor.

(Source: Duquesne University, School of Nursing)


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