Corporate Trainer

Office and Administration

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Clerical or OrganisingHelping or AdvisingSkill Level 4Skill Level 5

Training officers plan, develop, implement and evaluate training and development programs in organisations.

They often consult with an organisation's management and staff to identify areas where training is necessary to improve aspects such as efficiency and safety. Training officers work in industries all Future Growth Decline over Australia, from corporate offices in cities through to retail chains and fast food companies with stores in towns and cities. Training usually covers areas such as occupational health and safety, operating equipment, preparing for retirement, management and leadership skills, general clerical duties and/or industrial relations. Most training officers specialise in only one or two fields, so larger organisations may employ more than one.


ANZSCO description: Plans, develops, implements and evaluates training and development programs to ensure management and staff acquire the skills and develop the competencies required by an organisation to meet organisational objectives.

Alternative names: Trainer, Training Coordinator, Training Officer

Specialisations: Education Officer (Air Force and Army), Training Systems Officer (Navy)

Knowledge, skills and attributes

A training officer needs: 

  • excellent communication and presentation skills
  • initiative, tact and maturity
  • aptitude for research
  • good people skills
  • to be motivated and able to motivate others
  • organisational skills
  • to be flexible in their teaching methods


Duties and Tasks

Training officers may perform the following tasks:Training words

  • coordinate a staff training program based on organisational and employee needs
  • use questionnaires and surveys in consultation with managers and staff to analyse training needs as they relate to the goals of the organisation and work area
  • compile training manuals
  • develop training resources, which may involve preparing notes and visual displays from researched information or their own knowledge
  • arrange or conduct training courses, which may involve demonstrating equipment, operating video recorders and cameras, leading group discussions or role-playing activities and employing experts to run sessions
  • evaluate the effectiveness of training programs using surveys, questionnaires, interviews and observation, in order to plan future courses or to amend existing ones
  • obtain information on work-related external courses, prepare reports on their suitability and make recommendations on staff attendance at training courses
  • prepare, administer and conduct training assessments
  • provide career development sessions for existing staff and conduct induction sessions for new employees
  • assist in developing training interventions to meet the needs of internal and external stakeholders
  • support learners during training interventions
  • maintain learner outcomes in a Learning Management System.

Working conditions

Training officers instruct staff and management in many areas including occupational health and safety, operating plant machinery and equipment, driving, industrial relations, preparing for retirement, general clerical duties and supervisory skills.

Working conditions for training officers depend largely on the subjects they teach. In many cases they work indoors, in an office or classroom environment, though they may also work in workshops or outdoors. They often conduct training at a client's workplace, which in some instances may require them to complete a safety induction, particularly if visiting a construction or mine site. Depending on the size and structure of an organisation, training officers may be required to travel interstate or even overseas to assess a workplace and deliver training.

Most training officers work regular hours, however, they may also work evening and weekends, depending on a client's specific needs. Corporate Trainer

Tools and technologies

Most training officers use computers and various types of audio-visual equipment, such as projectors and microphones, to deliver training. A range of other equipment may also be used, depending on the specific training being delivered. For instance, a training officer teaching staff how to use a new piece of industrial machinery would need to be able to use it correctly themselves.
 
Education and training/entrance requirements

To become a training and development professional, you usually need to complete a formal qualification in human resource management, training and development, or a related area. You may also be required to have significant experience in the area in which you offer training.

The Certificate IV in Training and Assessment is offered at TAFE colleges and other registered training organisations throughout Australia.

You can also complete a degree majoring in human resource management.

 

Did You Know?

Companies have long sought to boost their employees' performance through training and leadership programs.

U.S. businesses spent $171.5 billion on learning and development in 2010, the most recent year for which data is available, according to the American Society for Training and Development.

General Electric Co., for example, spends $1 billion annually on training and education programs for its employees, according to its website.
(Source: Wall Street Journal)



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