Life On The Job



Indigenous Famous or Historic People



Patrick [Patty] Sammie James Mills [11 August 1988 - ] Sportsperson - Basketballer

 

Olympian
Patty Mills an Olympian Boomer
(Source: Olympics - Toyko)

Patrick Sammie Mills (born 11 August 1988) is an Australian professional basketball player for the San Antonio Spurs of the National Basketball Association (NBA).

Mills was born and raised in Canberra, and is of Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal Australian descent. In 2007, he became only the third Indigenous basketball player to play for Australia's national team. Mills was selected by the Portland Trail Blazers with the 55th overall pick in the 2009 NBA draft after playing two years of college basketball for Saint Mary's College of California.

A 6'0" guard, Mills began his NBA career with the Portland Trail Blazers in 2010. In 2011, during the NBA lockout, Mills played for the Melbourne Tigers of the National Basketball League (NBL) and for the Xinjiang Flying Tigers in China. Mills returned to the United States in March 2012 and signed with the San Antonio Spurs, where he has remained ever since.



On Wednesday 7th July 2021, Patty was named one of the Australian Olympic Team's Flagbearers, alongside Cate Campbell.

Announcement of Flagbearer
Olympic Australian Flagbearer announced July 2021
(Source: ABC News)

Olympic Update 7 August 2021

"Patty for PM.

That was the call coming from basketball fans who watched a perfect Patty Mills lead the Boomers to their first ever Olympic medal courtesy of a 107-93 win over Slovenia on Saturday night.

The veteran of four Olympic campaigns was sensational as he poured in 42 points in the bronze medal playoff, banishing the demons associated with four previous losses when third place was on the line at a Games. The man of the hour became emotional when receiving his precious bling on the podium alongside his teammates, breaking down in tears.

“We have been waiting for this moment for a long time. And it’s taken a lot of experiences, a lot of ups, a lot of downs, for us to get over the hump,” Mills told Channel 7. “And it’s our culture, at the end of the day, Australian culture, our Aussie spirit.

“It’s the boys being able to hang together and understand the meaning of what it means to represent your country, and how deep the layers go. For it to just come pouring out in moments like this (is great).

“I don’t know whether to cry, laugh, smile, a lot of emotions.

“It’s time to bring an Olympic medal home, back to our country, Australia, so I can hang it up at mum and dad’s house.” (Source: News)

After winning
After winning the Bronze Olympic Medal

Fast Facts

Sport:
Basketball

Event:
Men's Basketball

Team:
Patty Mills - Tokyo 2020 Flagbearer alongside Cate Campbell [held in July 2021]
Australian Boomers #5 /San Antonio Spurs#8

League:
National Basketball Association [NBA]/Australian Boomers

Position:
Point Guard

Height:
6' or 183cm

Weight:
79Kg

Olympic History:
Beijing 2008, London 2012, Rio 2016, Tokyo 2021

Year Born:
1988

State Born:
ACT

Early Life

Mills was born in the Australian capital city of Canberra. Mills' father, Benny, is a Torres Strait Islander (Muralag) and his mother, Yvonne, is Aboriginal Australian (Nyunga), the daughter of a white man and an Aboriginal woman. As part of the Stolen Generations, she and her four siblings were taken from their parents by the Australian state after her parents' separation in 1949. Mills has said that learning of his mother's past was a "turning point" in his understanding of his identity as Indigenous Australian.

Patty at two practising
Patrick playing basketball at age of two
(Source: ABC News)

 

Education & Training

Patrick attended Marist College Canberra until the end of 2004 to attend the Australian Institute of Sport [AIS] and Lake Ginninderra College for Years 11 - 12.

Champion AFL player for Marist College
First VXIII AFL Marist College Premier Team - Champions 2004 aged 16
(Source: Patty Mills)

In 2006, Mills was the youngest athlete selected in the 22-man extended Australian Boomers squad ahead of the 2006 FIBA World Championship. In July, he was named the 2006 Junior Male Player of the Year at Basketball Australia's annual Junior Basketball Awards.

Mills was named the "most promising new sports talent" at the 2006 Deadlys Awards. The Deadlys Awards honor Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders achievements in sports, music, entertainment and community. In addition to receiving the Deadlys Award, Mills was named the 2006 Australia Basketball Player of the Year and the National Sportsperson of the Year by the NAIDOC.


Employment

In November 2006, Mills signed to play college basketball for Saint Mary's College of California beginning in the 2007–08 season. He set a Saint Mary's freshman record for points in a season with 472, and set the school freshman mark for points in a game with a 37-point performance against Oregon on 20 November 2007.

Due to the 2011 NBA lockout, Mills returned to Australia to play in the National Basketball League (NBL). On 29 August 2011, he signed with the Melbourne Tigers.

On 27 March 2012, Mills signed with the San Antonio Spurs. On 26 April 2012, Mills set career highs with 34 points and 12 assists for his first NBA double-double in a 107–101 win over the Golden State Warriors. Mills posted the highest single-game score by an Australian in the NBA, surpassing Andrew Bogut's 32 points in January 2010.

On 13 July 2012, Mills re-signed with the Spurs. In the Spurs' second last game of the regular season on 15 April 2013, Mills scored a season-high 23 points in a 116–106 loss to Golden State.

On 19 January 2020, Mills made his 1,000th NBA 3-pointer. He is the first Australian player in NBA history to reach that milestone.

On 29 December 2020, he became the tenth player in Spurs history to play in 600 games with the team. As of December 2020, Mills is the Spurs' longest-tenured player and is the only player remaining on the roster who was a member of the Spurs' NBA championship-winning team in 2014.

Boomers
(Source: Basketball Australia)

 

 'Boomers', the colloquial term for adult male Kangaroos, is the perfect nickname for the Australian men's basketball team.

Australian Boomers

Patty with other Boomers

Patty #5

Australian National Team Career

In 2007, Mills made his senior national team debut for the Boomers at the FIBA Oceania Championship. Mills became the third Indigenous basketball player to play for Australia behind Olympians Michael Ah Matt (1964) and Danny Morseu (1980–84).

The following year, he played for Australia at the FIBA Diamond Ball tournament and represented his country at the Beijing Olympics, where he averaged 14.2 points per game. Mills went on to play for Australia at the 2010 FIBA World Championship and 2011 FIBA Oceania Championship, before once again representing his country at the 2012 London Olympics. At the 2012 Olympics, Mills had the highest scoring average with 21.2 points per game, ahead of Kevin Durant of the United States, who averaged 19.5 points per game.

In 2013, Mills played for Australia at the FIBA Oceania Championship. Two years later, he played at the 2015 FIBA Oceania Championship. In 2016, he helped the Boomers finish fourth at the 2016 Rio Olympics.[65]

In 2021, Mills will become the first indigenous Australian to be a flag bearer at an Olympic games when he co-carries the Australian flag at the Tokyo Olympic games

Patty Mills competing
(Source: ABC News)

Did You Know?

BASKETBALL POSITIONS


A basketball team can have a lot of players, but only five can play in a game at any one time. Players in a basketball game have assigned basketball positions: center, power forward, small forward, point guard, and shooting guard.

Centre

The centre is the tallest player on each team, playing near the basket. On offense, the centre tries to score on close shots and rebound. But on defense, the centre tries to block opponents’ shots and rebound their misses.

Power Forward

The power forward does many of the things a centre does, playing near the basket while rebounding and defending taller players. But power forwards also take longer shots than centres.

Small Forward

The small forward plays against small and large players. They roam all over on the court. Small forwards can score from long shots and close ones.

Point Guard

The point guard runs the offense and usually is the team’s best dribbler and passer. The point guard defends the opponent’s point guard and tries to steal the ball.

Shooting Guard

The shooting guard is usually the team’s best shooter. The shooting guard can make shots from long distance and also is a good dribbler.
(Source: NBA)




Patty is a Point Guard

POINT GUARD

The point guard plays a pivotal role in their team’s tempo and execution.
This position requires a high basketball IQ, as the point guard acts as the on-court coach by setting up plays. Point guards bring the ball up court, direct traffic and make the decisions that ideally result in high-percentage shots.

Point guards must have solid passing and ball-handling skills. As the floor general, point guards need to be vocal. Gyms can get loud. Point guards must be able to overcome the noise to set up plays.

On offense, point guards need the ability to drive the lane. They also need a solid jump shot and 3-pointer. On defense, they can focus on guarding the other team’s best ball handler and getting into the passing lane for a steal.

The point guard is often the shortest player on the court. However, that isn’t always the case. Any player with the necessary skills can play the position, no matter how tall they are.

Skills and attributes needed to play point guard include:

Ball handling
Passing
Quickness
Communication
Composure
Unselfishness
(Source: Dick's ProTips)

YouTube: Spurs Stories: Patty Mills
https://youtu.be/DRwfQM5EtH0

 

YouTube: Spurslandia Episode 1: Patty Mills
https://youtu.be/3ebPzfBgsVs

 

 

YouTube: Patty Mills ERUPTS For 22 PTS & 4 AST In Australia's Win! 13 July 2021
https://youtu.be/q0zsCgb15VY

 

YouTube: The Guard you can't stop • Patty Mills • Best Of • FIBA 5 September 2020
https://youtu.be/g2PYgTfOnhk

YouTube: Patty Mills "For My People" Documentary Trailer
https://youtu.be/J1bh4b3PB-M

 

 

 

Links:

Patty Mills' Website

website
Australian Olympic Team - Tokyo - July 2021

Olympic Team
Basketball Reference

Patrick Mills BB Reference
NBA - Patty Mills

NBA
Basketball Australia

BB Australia
 

 


Activities

Robot Basketball (developed by Try Engineering.org)

PrimaryPrimary  MiddleMiddle High SchoolSecondary

 

ICT Capability Australian Curriculum General Capability: ICT Capability

Critical & Creative ThinkingAustralian Curriculum General Capability: Critical & Creative Thinking

NumeracyAustralian Curriculum General Capability: Numeracy

LiteracyAustralian Curriculum General Capability: Literacy

 

TeacherTeacher

This lesson demonstrates the difference between precision and accuracy. Students design a device that can shoot a basketball free-throw shot accurately every time.

  • Explore precision and accuracy.
  • Design & build a device that can throw a free-throw shot accurately.
  • Implement the engineering design process to solve the design challenge.

Lesson Plan
Student Handouts

1. Materials & Preparation

Build Materials (For each team)
Required Materials (Trading/Table of Possibilities)

Pieces of corrugated cardboard (different sizes cut out of boxes)
Card stock and/or file folders
Cups and Plates (foam, plastic and paper all different sizes)
Plastic spoons
Rulers
String
Pipe cleaners
Craft Sticks
Straws
Binder Clips (all sizes)
Paper Clips (all sizes)
Rubber Bands
Craft Wire or pipe cleaners
Wood skewers
Clay
Paper and/or Construction paper
Optional: Basketball

Testing Materials

Chair, desk or small table (surface is 2 feet above the floor)
Trash can (small)
Plastic cups (different sizes)
Masking tape
Ping Pong Balls (3 or more, the ones painted like a basketball are fun or use a sharpie to add the lines yourself)

Materials

  • Chair, desk or small table (surface is 2 feet above the floor)
  • Trash can (small)
  • Plastic cups (different sizes)
  • Masking tape
  • Ping Pong Balls (3 or more, the ones painted like a basketball are fun or use a sharpie to add the lines yourself)

Process

  • Set up the Testing Zone with a “net” – small trash can or a plastic cup (depending on how challenging you would like it to be)
  • Tape the “net” on a chair, desk or small table (2 feet above the floor)
  • Place a piece of masking tape on the floor 6 feet away from the net – this is the starting line
  • Place 3 ping-pong balls in a cup at the starting line
  • Have each team use their robot design to make 3 free throw shots from the starting line
  • Teams document how many of their shots go into the net and then calculate their percentage of accuracy (see below). They also note the precision of each shot (how close they land to each other)

Optional Testing Zone Set-up

  • Tape a cup to the wall (2 feet above a desk )
  • Place a desk 6 feet away – this is the starting line
  • Place 3 ping-pong balls in a cup at the starting line
  • Have each team use their robot design to make 3 free throw shots from the starting line
  • Teams document how many of their shots go into the net and then calculate their percentage of accuracy (see below). They also note the precision of each shot (how close they land to each other)

Calculating Accuracy

  • Accuracy is how close a measured value is to the actual (true) value.
  • Precision is how close the measured values are to each other.

Each team calculates their percentage of accuracy by taking how many of their shots went into the net divided by 3 shots multiplied by 100.

2 in basket / 3 shots x 100 = 67% (rounded)

Engineering Design Challenge

Students: PrimaryPrimary  MiddleMiddle High SchoolSecondary

Design Challenge

  • You are part of a team of engineers challenged to design and build a “robot” basketball player. The “robot” must be able to accurately shoot three free-throw shots into a net that is 2 feet above the floor and 6 feet from the “robot.”

Criteria

  • Net must be 2 feet above the floor (or desk) and 6 feet from the “robot.”

Constraints

  • Only get 3 free-throw shots for the tryout
  • Use only the materials provided
  • Teams may trade unlimited materials

 

TeacherTeacher

1. Break class into teams of 2-3.

2. Hand out the Robot Basketball worksheet, as well as some sheets of paper for sketching designs.

3. Discuss the topics in the Background Concepts Section.

  • If you have a basketball, hold it up and ask…how many of you have ever played basketball? What types of shots do players have to make? [The official types of shots involved in basketball are the mid-range shot, the layup, the three-pointer, the dunk, the alley-oop, the half-court shot, and the free-throw shot.]
  • Ask a student to demonstrate the free-throw shot by throwing a crumpled-up paper into a trash can 6 feet away.
    • Point out motion from the arm specifically from the elbow to the hands.
    • Ask (or tell if they don’t already know about simple machines): What simple machine does this part of the arm look like to you?
      • A lever is a rigid bar that rotates around a fixed point called a fulcrum, which lifts or moves loads.
      • In an arm, the elbow is the fulcrum and the forearm is the stiff bar.


4. Review the Engineering Design Process, Design Challenge, Criteria, Constraints and Materials.

5. Instruct students to start brainstorming and sketching their designs.

6. Provide each team with their materials.

7. Explain that students must develop

8. Announce the amount of time they have to design and build (1 hour recommended).

9. Use a timer or an on-line stopwatch (count down feature) to ensure you keep on time. (www.online-stopwatch.com/full-screen-stopwatch). Give students regular “time checks” so they stay on task. If they are struggling, ask questions that will lead them to a solution quicker.

10. Students meet and develop a plan for their robot. They agree on materials they will need, write/draw their plan, and present their plan to the class. Teams may trade unlimited materials with other teams to develop their ideal parts list.

11. Teams build their designs. Make special note of how students’ “robots” must be ACCURATE (successful in getting their “basketball” into the “net” 3 times in a row). See the Student Resource sheet or Background Concepts section for information on the difference between accuracy and precision. Their robot must be 100% accurate. Students can either test at their own station where they set up a mock testing zone of their own or they can use the class “testing zone” as they build.

12. Test the robot designs using the testing zone outlined under the “Testing Materials and Process” section.

13. Teams should document how many of their shots go into the net and then calculate their percentage of accuracy (see below). They also note the precision of each shot (how close they land to each other)
Each team calculates their percentage of accuracy by taking how many of their shots went into the net divided by 3 shots multiplied by 100.
2 in basket / 3 shots x 100 = 67% (rounded)

14. As a class, discuss the student reflection questions.
For more content on the topic, work on “Digging Deeper” section here: 

  • including Accuracy and Precision (mathsisfun.com)
  • Writing Activity: Students could write short stories about their team’s free-throw player and/or the World Robotic Basketball League (WRBL), personifying the “robot(s).” Students could create an ad that will promote the WRBL to draw more people to the games. Students could write an explanatory essay detailing the steps their robot takes to make an accurate free-throw shot.


Reflection
Student Reflection

  • What went well?
  • What didn’t go well?
  • Were there any trades-offs (an exchange that occurs as a compromise or concession) you had to make with your design? If so, explain.
  • What is your favorite element of your “Robot”?
  • If you had time to redesign again, what changes would you make?

Time Modification

The lesson can be done in as little as 1 class period for older students. However, to help students from feeling rushed and to ensure student success (especially for younger students), split the lesson into two periods giving students more time to brainstorm, test ideas and finalize their design. Conduct the testing and debrief in the next class period.

 

Alternative activity:

Purdu Robotics at the Final Four

Purdue

 

Life on the Job

Other Famous Australian Sportspersons in "On the Job":

Lionel Rose

Lionel Rose
Cathy Freeman

Cathy Freeman
Michael Milton

Michael Milton
Evonne Goolagong Cawley

Evonne Goolagong Cawley
  Ashleigh Barty

Ash Barty
 

Material sourced from
Olympics

Wikipedia

 

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