Tennis Coach

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Assistant Tennis Coach
Head Tennis Coach
High Performance Tennis Coach

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Practical or MechanicalNature or RecreationClerical or OrganisingHelping or advisingSkill Level 2
Skill Level 3Skill Level 4Skill Level 5

A tennis coach works with people who want to learn, improve, or compete in tennis. Tennis Coaches provide training to students who wish to learn how to play tennis, improve their tennis skills, or compete in tennis tournaments. They coordinate individual and group tennis lessons, develop training programs based on students' tennis skills, and evaluate students’ performance.  Future Growth Very Strong

 

Knowledge, skills and attributes

  • Proven experience working as a Tennis Coach or Instructor.
  • Sound knowledge of various coaching techniques.
  • CPR and first aid certifications.
  • The ability to motivate students.
  • Excellent organizational, analytical, and problem-solving skills.
  • Exceptional communication and customer service skills.
  • A passion for tennis.

     

Tennis Coach at practice
Practicing
(Source: Better Team)


Duties and Tasks

The duties of a coach involve helping players develop various skills that are useful in a live match, such as serving the tennis ball, backhand play, and more. They lead one-on-one or group practices, often at a school or club tennis court. A tennis coach should be able to gauge student abilities and provide them with instruction to improve their skills on the tennis court.

  • Assisting students in developing and improving various tennis skills
  • Assessing students' tennis skills to determine areas in need of improvement.
  • Motivates students and supervises practice sessions.
  • Coordinating and conducting individual and group tennis lessons.
  • Developing suitable training programs for students based on their age, objectives, and individual skillsets.
  • Developing innovative ways to assist beginner or younger students in learning and remembering the rules of the game.
  • Promotes tennis and skills development, and oversees the participation of young people in tennis.
  • Identifying the learning styles that work best for each student and adapting all coaching methods accordingly.
  • Providing a secure and productive learning environment for students.
  • Scheduling meetings with students' parents or guardians to discuss their progress.
  • Attending students' tennis matches, competitions, and tournaments as required.
  • Officiates at tennis events to enforce rules.
  • Recruits players and other coaching staff.
  • Arranges entries into tennis competitions.
  • Co-ordinates and directs tennis activities, and liaises with other tennis officials to interpret and enforce rules and regulations relating to tennis.


Education and training/entrance requirements

You need a high level of tennis skills and knowledge to work as a Tennis Coach. Formal qualifications might be useful but aren't essential. Tennis coaching courses are available through Tennis Australia. You can obtain a Bachelor’s degree in Physical Education, Sports Management, or a related field.

Qualifications may include a bachelor’s degree and experience playing tennis at an university or professional level. A high school tennis coach is typically a licensed teacher.

 

 

Assistant Tennis Coach
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Practical or MechanicalClerical or OrganisingNature or RecreationHelping or advisingSkill Level 2

Skill Level 3Skill Level 4Skill Level 5

An assistant tennis coach is primarily in charge of performing various tasks to assist and support tennis coaches and players. It is their duty to help coaches in preparing and setting-up facilities, monitoring inventory and purchasing supplies, facilitating training and practice sessions, and maintaining records of players. Their job also entails handling tasks such as preparing and processing documents, organizing files, managing calls and correspondence, and updating databases. Moreover, they work together with coaches in developing strategies to enhance the players' skills and game plans. Future Growth Very Strong

The main responsibility of an Assistant Tennis Coach is to work under the direction of a head coach and evaluate the students and assist in organizing and running specific training programs of athletes at various skill levels. The job description entails planning drills and improving the player’s skills and preparing them for each tennis match they are competing with.

Knowledge, skills and attributes   

  • be able to train participants and be able to explain the intricacies of the game to both intermediary and senior-level players
  • Patience and confidence are needed to deal with slow learners
  • Communication skills shows that you are able to relay your thoughts, opinions and ideas clearly to those around you.
  • Dedication is a skill that refers to one's commitment to a project or responsibility.
  • Interpersonal skills involves being able to communicate efficiently with multiple people regarding your thoughts, ideas and feedback.

Practising       
(Source: Improve Your Tennis)

Duties and Tasks

  • Provide support to coach tennis team and participate in various tennis tournaments./span>
  • Train and counsel students to improve physical, social and intellectual behavior of all students.
  • Administer and evaluate team physical talent through quality coaching and teaching team work principles.
  • Plan and administer all sorts of training sessions for team members through proper planning.
  • Recruit tennis players from students and collaborate with Tennis Australia's office to increase enrollment for various tennis matches.
  • Provide professional training to student team members and participate in various competitive games.
  • Maintain and evaluate all of equipment inventories and provide regular updates.
  • Manage student tennis team and maintain entire equipment and facilities used by team members.
  • Ensure that team members and games in compliance with state and Tennis Australia’s’s policies and procedures.

Education and training/entrance requirements

You need a high level of tennis skills and knowledge to work as an Assistant Tennis Coach. Formal qualifications might be useful but aren't essential. Tennis coaching courses are available through Tennis Australia. You can obtain a Bachelor’s degree in Physical Education, Sports Management, or a related field.

Head Tennis Coach
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Practical or MechanicalClerical or OrganisingHelping or advisingAnalytic or ScientificSkill Level 3

Skill Level 4Skill Level 5

 

The head tennis coach responsibilities include supervising the performance of the tennis players and giving them tips on how to play better tennis. A head tennis coach also administrates and directs other junior tennis coaches with enhancing the performances of the players. Future Growth Very Strong

Knowledge, skills and attributes           

Duties and Tasks

  • Monitor workplace operations like staff meetings and training to manage and improve knowledge, program effectiveness and efficiency.
  • Arbitrate in personal and personnel disputes.
  • Monitor tennis coaches to ensure timely administration and implementation of programs and duties and prospering stakeholder relationships.
  • Mentor tennis coaches to develop clients
  • Execute Academy’s business philosophy and vision.
  • Create and execute term schedules with Director of Programming.
  • Select and enroll clients in Tennis Academy programs.
  • Report to and meet with Director of Programming for updates regularly.
  • Monitor equipment inventory and determine equipment needs.
  • Instruct clients and drive Tennis Academy functions.

Working conditions

Tools and technologies

Education and training/entrance requirements

You need a high level of tennis skills and knowledge to work as the Head Tennis Coach. Formal qualifications might be useful but aren't essential. Tennis coaching courses are available through Tennis Australia. You can obtain a Bachelor’s degree in Physical Education, Sports Management, or a related field.

 


High Performance Tennis Coach
Leisure and Entertainment

Practical or MechanicalClerical or OrganisingHelping or advisingAnalytic or ScientificSkill Level 3
Skill Level 4Skill Level 5

High Performance Tennis Coaches are the people who are responsible for taking a lot of tennis players from the amateur phase and transform them into seasoned professionals. The role of the coach is not just about cheering the players on but developing all aspects of a player's game. Future Growth Very Strong

Did You Know?

The Conversation 21 January 2013

The Conversation

"
So what exactly sets an expert coach apart?

Watch and (help others to) learn
There are many facets to coaching but one of the primary responsibilities is guiding player development through technique analysis and feedback. Visit the practice courts to watch any of the players and you will no doubt see their coach out on court, scrutinising their player’s performance. It is the coach’s job to view the player’s technique, analyse critical features, detect errors and provide timely and accurate feedback so the player’s performance can be improved.

Even slight changes in ball toss or trunk rotation – which may be imperceptible to the untrained eye – can have a significant effect on speed, accuracy and consistency in a player’s game. Consequently, the skill of observation is critical for coaches and a key to their success. What the coach can or can’t “see” in a player’s technique directly influences the feedback they can provide a player.

Like coach, like player
What a coach “sees” are the kinematics of action – how the player’s limbs are positioned and coordinated in space to produce the desired movement outcome (ball speed and direction). An enhanced understanding or ability to interpret the kinematics of an action allows expert coaches to make informed, accurate and often quick decisions. It is a quality that separates them from other less-skilled coaches.

This same concept of expert interpretation of movement patterns is evident in players as well – when returning serve, for instance. The best receivers in the world appear to have all the time in the world to get a serve back over the net. This advantage is borne out of superior perceptual skills to interpret an opponent’s serve mechanics, which ultimately gives them more time to react.

Through research we know that expert tennis players are better at perceiving and interpreting an opponent’s body movements prior to ball impact during the serve, allowing them to accurately anticipate shot direction and produce a successful response. Like expert players, expert coaches are better equipped to perceive and interpret important kinematic information, and then to use this information to determine whether a change in technique is required.

What we did
Through a series of experiments (the results of which haven’t yet been published) analysing the gaze behaviour of coaches we have discovered that when watching a player’s serve, expert coaches tend to focus on proximal areas (those close to the midline) such as the trunk. Novices spend more time viewing the racquet and ball motion. We analysed the coaches’ gaze using a lightweight pair of glasses with two small cameras, one positioned to capture the scene (what the coach is seeing) and one to capture the coach’s eye. When combined, the two cameras allow us to see exactly where the coach is looking.

It is well known that the ability to interpret and use earlier occurring information (“proximal kinematics”) is a key contributor to expertise. Proximal segments (such as the trunk) are critically important as they form the foundation of movement. They also typically move slower so they are easier to see than distal segments such as the racquet.

Putting it all together
With a greater understanding of the kinetic chain – a sequence of movements, usually proximal to distal used to create an effective tennis serve – expert coaches are able to identify problems with the player’s game. For example an expert coach will identify low clearance over the net then use their superior knowledge of kinematics to pinpoint specific segments – poor leg drive perhaps – which are contributing to or causing the particular problem. Coaches may not always be aware of how they perceive kinematics, or how sensitive they are to seeing changes in technique but, like players, they operate best when performing judgements automatically, or without conscious processing.

An increased understanding of kinematics is also what allows coaches to prescribe exercises or drills aimed at fixing specific technical issues contributing to larger problems in a player’s game. It’s this eye for detail that ultimately leads to the production of champion players."
(Source: The Conversation)

Knowledge, skills and attributes     

A HP tennis coach must embody professionalism, sportsmanship, and excellence to inspire and motivate players.

  • Safety awareness
  • Excellent verbal and written communication
  • Excellent team building skills
  • Awareness of nutritional advice
  • Excellent Strategic Planning
  • Excellent ability to give individual instruction
  • Ability to provide technique demonstration

Duties and Tasks

The role of the HPT coach is not just about cheering the players on. Every aspiring tennis player has the dream to grow from an amateur to a professional. A HP tennis coach is instrumental in growing the players through the different ups and downs in the sport.

The role of the HPT coach can be summarized into five aspects.

  • Persuasion – A tennis coach is responsible for persuading the tennis player to undertake certain challenges or sign contracts. Every coach is to have the power of persuasion because they would be responsible for instigating these players to take the bold steps that would propel their career.
  • Evaluation – This can be said to be the most important and common role of tennis coaches. The coach is responsible for the evaluation of every aspect of the tennis player’s life. They will evaluate their performance during matches, their training and even their diet. It is through this evaluation that they would be able to advise the player. Their evaluation can make or break their career.
  • Provision of information – Information is vital to the success of every player. The information given by a coach can be info of updates on upcoming matches, training evaluation report, advice on upcoming matches and so on. This information forms a huge part of the tennis player’s life.
  • Motivate and Inspire – There comes a time in the life of every tennis player where they experience a huge loss or life changing event. The tennis coach is to get the player back on the right track. They do this by motivating and inspiring them using the best means possible to them. A lot of tennis players have attributed their success to the motivational role of their coaches.
  • Solve problems – Tennis is not a sport without its own bottle necks and challenges. The challenges may be in form of a tough opponent or long stretches of matches. The coach works with the tennis player to go around these problems. The coach is responsible for analyzing such problems and providing the advice that would eliminate that problem. A close look at players who easily overcome their challenges would reveal that their coaches have been instrumental to their success.

The HP tennis coach can be said to be the most important aspect of the professional life of every tennis player

  • to build a strong working relationship with their player
  • to provide feedback on how a player can improve
  • to work with a player to set specific goals to focus their energy on
  • coaches research and identify the tournaments that their player has a realistic chance of winning
  • to perform strong research and stretch their players, while also ensuring that the goals they set for them are within reach
  • be able to read their tennis player's mindset and attitude
  • tailor their coaching to fit the strengths of their player
  • to break down an opponents game and come up with a game plan to defeat them
  • to draw on their [HPTC's] network to find a solution to a problem they cannot solve

 

Education and training/entrance requirements

You need a high level of tennis skills and knowledge to work as the HP Tennis Coach. Formal qualifications might be useful but aren't essential. Tennis coaching courses are available through Tennis Australia. You can obtain a Bachelor’s degree in Physical Education, Sports Management, or a related field.

 

 

 

Life on the Job

Famous Australian Tennis Players on this website:

 

Ash Barty

Ash Barty
Evonne Goolagong Cawley

Evonne Goolagong Cawley

 

 

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Materials sourced from

Better Team [Tennis Coach; ]
Great Sampler Resumer [Assistant Tennis Coach; Head Tennis Coach;]
Improve Your Tennis [High Performance Tennis Coach;]
Future Sports Academy [Role of Tennis Coaches;]
Live Career [Tennis Coach; ]
Zip Recruiter [ Tennis Coach; ]
Zippia [Assistant Tennis Coach; ]

JobOutlook [Tennis Coaches;  ]

 

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