Sports Coach

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Amateur Sports Coach
Athletic Trainer
Professional Sport Coach

Sports Trainer
Swimming Teacher/Coach

 


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Sports coaches teach individuals and teams how to improve the way they play their sport by analysing their performances, instructing them in relevant skills, providing motivation and enhancing their Future Growth Very Strong capabilities.

Sports coaches develop the ability, technique and performance of professional or amateur sports people. They teach either individuals or teams how to improve the skills that they need to succeed in their chosen sport, and instruct on the specifics of technique and strategy.

They supervise and facilitate training sessions, plan individual programs for each player, liaise with sports science support staff, oversee competitions or games, analyse their team or individual client's performance, and work with managers to select team members for particular matches or competitions. They may work for sporting clubs and recreation centres instructing the public, or they may work for specific professional teams with high-level athletes.

Sports coaches operate on a professional (paid) or honorary (unpaid) basis. They usually specialise in a particular sport. The degree of personal proficiency required to coach a sport varies widely, and can include experience as a voluntary junior coach through to an elite coach of a highly commercialised sport.

 

ANZSCO description: Coaches, trains and instructs participants in other sports by analysing their performances and developing their abilities. Registration or licensing may be required.

Specialisations: Sports coaches usually specialise in a particular sport. Sports coaches operate on a professional (paid) or honorary (unpaid) basis. The degree of personal proficiency required to coach a sport varies widely and can include a voluntary junior coach through to an elite coach of a highly commercialised sport.

Basketball Coach, Cricket Coach, Football Coach, Sports Trainer, Windsurfing Instructor, Tennis Coach

Knowledge, skills and attributes

Sports coaches need: Hands

  • a passion for their chosen sport
  • good fitness and overall health
  • strategic and lateral thinking skills
  • good communication and interpersonal skills
  • the ability to be flexible and innovative
  • thorough understanding of preferred sport
  • enthusiastic, disciplined and dedicated
  • prepared to travel and to work long hours, evenings and weekends.

Duties and Tasks

Sports coaches may perform the following tasks:
Coaching words

  • observe individuals' performances to determine the level of instruction required
  • teach techniques to help players acquire additional skills or improve existing skills
  • supervise practice sessions
  • plan training programs
  • supervise the physical development of athletes
  • organise and liaise with sports science support staff
  • arrange entries into competitions
  • plan and direct game strategy, sometimes in consultation with club officials
  • analyse the progress of games or competitions and give signals and instructions to players
  • carry out after-competition analysis of performance and evaluate strategy
  • undertake related administrative tasks such as booking venues, organising tours and budgeting
  • travel with individuals and teams to competitions
  • recruit players and other coaching staff.

Working conditions

Sports coaches may work on a professional basis for state or national sporting teams or organisations, or they may work on an honorary and unpaid basis. They usually specialise in a particular sport and must therefore be particularly familiar with its rules and history. They can work either indoors or outdoors depending on the sport they specialise in. They may be required to work weekends, and to attend sporting events which may often also fall on weekends. They may be required to travel interstate or internationally to coach their team.

Tools and technologies

Sports coaches will need to be familiar with the equipment that is used in the sport in which they coach, and may also need to be familiar with sports monitoring technologies, fitness equipment, and other tools used by sports people in their training.

Education and training/entrance requirements

You can work as a sports coach or instructor without any formal qualifications. However, entry into this occupation may be improved by obtaining a qualification in sport development, sports or exercise science, or a related field. You may improve your employment prospects if you have experience and/or qualifications in a particular sport.

The Certificate IV in Sport Development is offered at TAFE Colleges and other registered training organisations throughout Australia. You can become a sports coach through a traineeship in Sport Coaching. You can also complete a degree majoring in sports science or exercise and sports science.

It is recommended that coaches become accredited. The National Coaching Accreditation Scheme (NCAS), coordinated by the Australian Sports Commission, offers education, training and accreditation to coaches. NCAS training programmes include components for both general coaching principles and sport-specific skills, techniques and strategies. NCAS-registered programmes are available in more than 70 sports, providing the industry-standard qualification for coaches.

Employment Opportunities

There are limited full-time positions for professional sports coaches. Coaches are employed by sporting clubs and associations, government agencies, government-funded centres (such as the Australian Institute of Sport, state, territory or regional institutes or academies of sport), holiday resorts and centres specialising in particular sports (such as horse-riding schools), swimming centres, health clubs, community institutions and educational institutions (schools and tertiary, for example). In some sports, coaches may be self-employed in a sports training centre that they own or lease. Many sports coaches also work on a voluntary basis.

There are a number of sports that have coaching development officers who are responsible for coordinating the many part-time and voluntary coaches who contribute to the sport.

Job opportunities depend on the number of people playing various sports, corporate sponsorship and media coverage of sporting events, the performance of Australian sporting teams and individuals and the level of community interest/involvement in these performances. Other factors include the acceptance of sports as part of a healthy lifestyle, the amount of money available to sporting clubs, the effectiveness of sports promotion, as well as the trend towards professionalism in many sports, including football, basketball, baseball, netball, hockey and soccer.

Professional Sports Coach
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Did You Know?

LOTJ
Cameo


Norma Plummer - Netball Coach to Australia and South Africa.

Norma Plummer
(Source: Fox Sports)



Norma Margaret Plummer AM (born 24 November 1944) is a former Australian national player who also served as netball coach for both Australia and South Africa. She was coach of the Australian national netball team from 2003 to 2011, ending her coaching career with the Diamonds on 67 victories from 89 Tests — a success rate of 75 per cent. She was replaced as coach of Australia by Lisa Alexander. She was appointed a Member of the Order of Australia for her services to the sport.

Norma Plummer began her career in 1967 and represented Australian Diamonds in 1972 with who she spent a decade which includes the win at the 1975 World Netball Championships in New Zealand.

She had a long and successful career as an Australian representative netballer, including a four-Test stint as national captain in 1978. After some time as playing coach of her state league team, Plummer embarked on a successful coaching career, coaching the Victorian state team to several victories at the national netball championships which was followed by her retirement from the team in 1982 and coaching the Melbourne Pumas in the Esso Superleague (later Mobil League).

After the Mobil League was disbanded in favour of the new Commonwealth Bank Trophy, Plummer became the founding coach of the new Melbourne Phoenix team, which took many of the players from the former Pumas, and successfully coached them to the inaugural premiership. She was also appointed coach of the Australian youth team and took them to several successes. She subsequently resigned as coach of the Phoenix at the beginning of the 1999 season in order to take up a position as head netball coach at the Australian Institute of Sport. While in this role, she was integral in the campaign to add the AIS Canberra Darters to the national competition.

After several years as coach of the national youth team, and having been rumoured for the head national coach position since the late 1980s, Plummer was the obvious favourite when Jill McIntosh resigned in July 2003, and subsequently took the reins of the national team in late August. In her nearly three years as coach for the Australian team, she has retained her prior reputation as a hard coach willing to axe even star players if not performing, and remains widely respected, even with a downturn in the team's fortunes during 2005.

In June 2006 after the silver medal in March at the Commonwealth Games Norma Plummer led her young team to victory in all Test Match Series in 2006 & 2007 and in November 2007 won the World Championships in Auckland, New Zealand.

In 2008 Plummer's team Australian Diamonds, had beaten Silver Ferns 53 to 51 at the Horncastle Arena and two years later won a gold medal at the 2010 Commonwealth Games in New Delhi. She also coached Australian national team at the 2011 Netball World Championships in Singapore.
(Source: Wikipedia)



In July [2011] Plummer had led Australia to consecutive world titles after a thrilling over time win against New Zealand in Singapore.

Senator Arbib [Minister for Sport] said Plummer had enjoyed tremendous international success and was regarded as one of the country’s best coaches.

“Norma Plummer has been an outstanding Australian netball coach, leading the
Diamonds to back-to-back World Titles in Singapore last month,[July 2011]” Senator Arbib said.

“She is passionate about the game and has developed the skills of some of our greatest netball talents during her eight years in the job.

“Norma leaves the national coaching position with the team on top of the world and at the top of its game, having developed some great young players who will be the core of the team for years to come.”

Plummer will now take on a coaching role at
West Coast Fever in the ANZ Championships.
(Source: Australian Sports Commission: Government congratulates Norma Plummer)

Diamonds
(Source: Diamonds - Australian Netball Team)

Norma Plummer's website
(Source: Norma Plummer)

YouTube: Norma Plummer - Coaching Philosophy
https://youtu.be/SoVmAP0rYUY



Athletic Trainer
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Clerical or OrganisingNature or RecreationHelping or advisingAnalytic or Scientific

Skill Level 4Skill Level 5

Athletic Trainers work with medical professionals, coaches and athletes to ensure that players are ready to play, maintain proper diets, and receive proper treatment in the event of illness or injury. They evaluate the physical condition of athletes, assist with establishing dietary and fitness plans, and use their knowledge of sports-related injuries to diagnose and treat players. Future Growth Very Strong

Athletic trainers are highly qualified, multi-skilled health care professionals who work as part of a collaborative inter-professional health care team. They work with physicians and other health care professionals to provide injury/illness prevention and wellness protection, clinical evaluation and diagnosis, immediate and emergency care, treatment and rehabilitation and organizational and professional health and well-being.

Many people think athletic trainers and personal trainers are the same career, but they are not. There is a significant difference in the education, skill set and job duties of an athletic trainer versus that of a personal trainer. Athletic training uses a medical model for professional education that includes both didactic and clinical education.
 

Knowledge, skills and attributes   

  • Bachelor’s degree in athletic training and a valid state license or certification.
  • Proven education or experience may be desired.
  • Strong understanding of the challenges athletes face, proper nutrition, sports injuries, and treatment options.
  • Understanding of first-aid treatments, massage, and physical therapy techniques and equipment.
  • Detail-oriented, analytical, and attentive.
  • Excellent interpersonal, problem solving, decision making, and communication skills. 

Athletic Trainer at work
(Source: BetterTeam)

Duties and Tasks

  • Working with coaches, athletes, and medical professionals to evaluate the player's condition.
  • Creating exercise and nutrition plans.
  • Speaking to coaches, family members, and athletes to set health and fitness goals.
  • Designing training and rehabilitation programs for athletes.
  • Using knowledge of sports-related injuries to diagnose and treat athletes.
  • Referring athletes to another doctor or other medical staff members.
  • Assisting and monitoring injured players as they heal and progress towards recovery.
  • Maintaining records relating to athlete condition and training, diet, and treatment plans.
  • Handling clerical tasks, such as maintaining inventory, assisting with budgets, or restocking supplies.

Working conditions

Many athletic trainers work in educational settings, such as colleges, universities, elementary schools, and secondary schools. Others work in hospitals, fitness centers, or physicians’ offices, or for professional sports teams.

Tools and technologies

In the past, athletic trainers were known for taping ankles and icing injuries, but new technology advancements are helping give these industry professionals the chance to be a part of an athlete’s injury prevention, treatment and rehabilitation process.

Athletic trainers can now identify concussions, administer neurocognitive tests, perform specialized rehab and treat heat-related illnesses. Athletic trainers use to spend lots of time watching videos, taking notes and then charting results to illustrate the athlete's performance, but now wearable devices are changing the game.

New technology is becoming smaller, more resilient and less cumbersome for athletes to wear, so trainers can get real-time data.

The massive adoption of mobile phones allows for quick messages between athletes, coaches and trainers. Watching video of previous games is still actively used by college and professional teams, but thanks to smart phones and smart televisions, it can now be viewed on numerous devices and even in the comfort of the athlete’s home.

There are also several fitness and diet trackers available to athletes to help them keep a physical record of their progress and their calorie intake. These programs are accessed through the Internet or mobile apps. Athletic trainers can utilize these journals to make sure athletes are eating properly as well as hold them accountable for their training. Technology advancements have produced a variety of wearables to enhance an athlete’s performance. Sensors placed on the body or in “smart clothing” deliver real time data to athletic trainers. Almost anything can be measured from these sensors including heart and breathing rate, hydration levels and core temperature.

Athletes have individual needs, so this specific data can help trainers decide when to give them a break or train harder, helping their overall performance.

Athletic Trainer
(Source: AusLeisure)

Injury Prevention

Not only does this individualized data help performance, but it can also help prevent injuries. With fatigue being one of the leading causes of injury in athletics, athletes can now wear sensors that alert athletic trainers and coaches when they have muscle fatigue. Another type of wearable is helping athletic trainers record whether a player is leaning a certain way when he cuts, jumps or lands, or if they are favoring one side over the other. This data indicates early signs of injury, muscular imbalance or movement dysfunction which can be improved in training to prevent further damage.

NFL teams are also using chips in their player’s pads to record data on force and impact. These readings help determine which athletes are vulnerable to concussions. This data is helping athletic trainers and coaches decide when a player needs to come off the field and if they need to undergo additional neurological tests.

Injury Rehabilitation

Once a player is injured or undergoes surgery to fix an injury, athletic trainers help them get back to peak playing performance. Athletic trainers use body performance measurements to test an athlete and make sure they are ready to get back on the field. If an athlete goes back to practicing at full strength, or playing in a game too early, it can result in aggravating the injury or making it worse.

Today, athletes rehabbing lower extremities can use anti-gravity treadmills to get them up and moving quicker. These machines act as a brace around the waist of the athlete and have a vacuum sealed skirt that can reduce 20 to 80 percent of the athlete’s weight, minimizing the amount of stress exerted on the body. Many trainers are also using pneumatic recovery units which wrap around the legs and are inflated with air. The athletes feel a massaging sensation as blood and lymphs are circulated throughout the legs.

While ice and tape will always be used by athletic trainers, technology has changed the way they do almost everything, from preventing injuries to rehabbing after surgery.

Education and training/entrance requirements

Your employment prospects may be improved if you have a background in the specific sport and/or have tertiary qualifications in a sports-related area. You may like to consider a VET qualification in sport coaching or sport development, or a degree in exercise and sports science, sports management or human movement. To get into these courses you usually need to gain your senior secondary school certificate or equivalent. English, mathematics, biology, and health & physical edication would be appropriate subjects to study prior to university.

It is recommended that sports coaches become accredited. The National Coaching Accreditation Scheme (NCAS), coordinated by the Australian Sports Commission, offers education and a nationally recognised qualification to people coaching at all levels.

Amateur Sports Coach
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Practical or MechanicalHelping or advisingAnalytic or ScientificSkill Level 1Skill Level 2
Skill Level 3Skill Level 4Skill Level 5

Amateur Sports Coaches teach amateur athletes the skills they need to succeed at their chosen sport. They teach sports skills to individuals and teams of all ages and abilities.

Knowledge, skills and attributes   

To become an amateur sports coach, you would need:

  • a thorough understanding of and enthusiam for your sport
  • good communication skills
  • good interpersonal skills
  • the ability to motivate others
  • discipline and dedication
  • good physical fitness
  • preparedness to travel and to work on evenings and weekends.       

 

Amateur Sports Coach
(Source: The Conversation)

Duties and Tasks

As an amateur sports coach, you would:

  • provide training direction, encouragement, and motivation to prepare athletes for games and competitive events
  • plan, organise, and conduct practice sessions
  • explain and enforce safety rules and regulations
  • plan and direct physical conditioning programs that will enable athletes to achieve maximum performance
  • instruct individuals or groups in sports rules, game strategies, and performance principles, such as specific ways of moving the body, hands, or feet, to achieve desired results
  • analyse the progress of games or competitions and give instructions to players
  • carry out post-competition analysis of performance
  • travel with individuals and teams to competitions.

Working conditions

Coaches often work irregular hours, including evenings, weekends, and holidays. Full-time coaches usually work more than 40 hours a week for several months during the sports season. Coaches travel frequently to sporting events. You are likely to need a current drivers' licence.

Education and training/entrance requirements

You can work as an amateur sports coach without formal qualifications. Most sports have a coach qualification framework that is managed by the sport's state or national governing body.

Employment Opportunities

Employment of sports coaches is projected to grow faster than the average for all occupations. Rising participation in sport at high school and in the community generally, as well as the growing interest in professional sport, are likely to increase demand for coaches.

 

Sports Trainer
Leisure and Entertainment

Practical or MechanicalAnalytic or ScientificSkill Level 4Skill Level 5

A Sports Trainer is a vital member of a sports team who provides a crucial link between the coach, player and health professional. They are highly qualified and multi skilled health care experts that help provide preventative services, emergency care, clinical diagnosis, therapeutic intervention and rehabilitation of injuries and medical conditions.

A Sports Trainer is responsible for making sport safer for the athletes that participate in it. That can be preventative, teaching players how to prevent injuries using anatomical expertise, or curative, giving first aid and ensuring injuries are tended to quickly and effectively.

Knowledge, skills and attributes   

  • Positive attitude to achieve in potentially difficult circumstances.
  • Excellent communication skills with both players and staff
  • Good organisational and time management skills.
  • Ability to work in a team and multi-skill environment.
  • Self-motivated and an ability to motivate others.
  • Professional appearance suitable for the relevant environment

       

Sports Trainer

Duties and Tasks

  • Training players in musculoskeletal anatomy and body movement.
  • Teaching players about nutrition and hydration, and ensuring they are eating and drinking correctly.
  • Discussing illnesses and injuries with players and providing frontline treatment.
  • Managing injured athletes and coordinating the rehabilitation process.
  • Giving players guidance and lead pre-match warm-up, stretching and post-match cooldowns.
  • Transporting injured athletes and coordinating contemporaneous medical services.
  • Taping hands, wrists, elbows, shoulders, knees and ankles with sports tape to prevent new injuries.
  • Comply with sporting codes, particularly regulations around drugs in sport
  • Monitor and Deliver First Aid and occurrence of injury treatment at all games.
  • Strap players for prevention of injury and stability prior to games.
  • Monitor players during games with regards to potential injuries or occurrence of injuries and initial treatment of.
  • Assess, record and document players’ injuries that occur in games.
  • Arrive at an appropriate time. This will be determined by the Head Coach
  • Assess players who are injured during games and give initial treatment.
  • Assist with the preparation of players in terms of strapping and first aid prior to the Game Day warm up.
  • Assist with the delivery of water (hydration)/First Aid treatment) on match day.

 

Education and training/entrance requirements

In recent years this role is being implemented in more and more teams around Australia and the world with teams putting more emphasis on ensuring the trainers have up-to-date qualifications and hands on experience. Sports Trainers need to be qualified to be able to manage the health and wellbeing of players and athletes. Complete a Sports Trainer Level 1, 2 or 3 certification. You can find these courses at private colleges, such as Sports Medicine Australia. There are no specific minimum entry requirements for Level 1, and it will take you between 1 day and 1 week to complete full-time. Level 1 is a prerequisite for Levels 2 and 3. Complete a Bachelor of Medicine, Sports Management or Exercise Science at university. You will need to have completed year 12 or gain special admission through an alternative pathway. You will need a police clearance and Working With Children Check if you plan to train people under 18 years of age.

 

AFL Sports Trainer
(Source: SEN)

The qualifications required to become a sports trainer vary quite a lot. In Australia, trainers will just need to hold a qualification in a medical field of some description. These can include:

Physiotherapy
Medicine
Sports Science
Health Care/Paramedicine
Nursing
Occupational Health & Safety

If you wish to become a sports trainer you can also complete various certificates through Sports Medicine Australia. These include Level 1, Level 2 and Level 3 Sports Trainer. You can also complete qualifications in Sports Taping, Sports Massage, Wound Management, Nutrition, Drugs in Sport and much more.

Become an AFL Sports Trainer
Sports trainers have been part of Australian Football since the origins of the game. They are part of the fabric of every club and play a key role in player preparation and safety at all levels. In community Australian Football clubs, first aid is usually provided by sports trainers or by other people with medical or higher level qualifications and experience. Sports trainers are likely to play a more major role when there is no-one else with medical or allied health qualifications at a game or training.

Become an NRL Sports Trainer
The NRL has a National Sports Trainers Accreditation Scheme that focusses on player welfare and associated risk management. This scheme has made it mandatory for all sports trainers to gain relevant qualifications. This can include a Certificate IV in Health Care, which several of their trainers are currently completing.

Sports Trainer
(Source: Seek)

 

Swimming Teacher/Coach
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Practical or MechanicalNature or RecreationHelping or advisingSkill Level 1

Swimming Teachers help children and adults develop proper swimming techniques. They may also coach swim teams and help more advanced swimmers enhance their swimming abilities. Swimming Instructors help people of all ages learn to swim and instruct them on matters of water safety. They are trained in aquatic safety, survival and rescue skills and are proficient swimmers, usually capable of swimming at least 25 metres in any given swimming stroke. They often work with children, teaching them water familiarisation, buoyancy techniques and safe diving techniques. FutureGrowthModerate

Swimming coaches teach competitive swimmers.

Alternative names: Swimming Instructor, Swim Instructor

Specialisations: Depending on age of learners and their abilities.

Swim Instructor

Knowledge, skills and attributes         

  • Proven experience working as a swim instructor or lifeguard.
  • CPR, First Aid, and Red Cross Water Safety Instructor or Basic Swim Instructor (BSI) certifications.
  • Sound knowledge of proper swimming techniques and water safety rules.
  • Strong swimming abilities.
  • Excellent conflict resolution skills.
  • Effective communication skills.
  • Good organisational skills
  • Passionate and enthusiastic
  • The ability to inspire confidence and motivate swimmers
  • Perseverance and patience
  • The ability to encourage people and put them at ease
  • An understanding of how to differentiate in a teaching session
  • Professional, punctual and well-organised person responsible for the implementation, development and organisation of swimming classes
  • Flexibility to work weekdays, evenings and weekends

Swimming Teacher
(Source: Becky Adlington Swim Stars)

Duties and Tasks

  • Teach groups and individual lessons
  • Teaching swimming techniques, swimming strokes, and water safety rules to students of all ages with varying swimming abilities.
  • Demonstrate different swimming techniques and strokes
  • Assisting more experienced swimmers to enhance their swimming abilities.
  • Assessing the progress of students and adjusting teaching programs accordingly.
  • Monitoring students to prevent accidents and injuries.
  • Implementing ground rules for each swim session.
  • Planning swimming lessons that take into account students’ abilities and progressive development.
  • Identifying incorrect swimming techniques and correcting students accordingly.
  • Follow strict safety standards
  • Ensuring that the swimming pool and locker rooms are kept clean and tidy
  • Planning and implementing teaching strategies, gathering basic documentation to support and reinforce in-person training
  • Teaching principles of movement in water
  • Teaching basic aquatic survival and rescue skills
  • Understand how to use lifesaving equipment and administer basic first aid
  • Developing water familiarisation, buoyancy and mobility in children and people of all ages
  • Teaching safer diving skills
  • Supporting efficient stroke development
  • Supervising public swimming pools and group swimming sessions.

Working conditions

Swimming Instructors work in a range of settings such as public pools and aquatic centres, at holiday camps and in educational departments. They may also provide private tuition in residential homes. As a swimming teacher or swimming coach you would usually work irregular hours, including early mornings, in the evenings and at weekends. As a coach you would be expected to attend competitions to support your students. Part-time work is generally available.

You could work in a range of places, including government-run pools, leisure centres or schools. As a coach, you may have to travel locally, nationally or internationally.

Swimming Teacher
(Source: Seek)

Tools and technologies

Swimming apps such as swim analytics platform can track different metrics based on swimmer motion. The metrics include splits, stroke rates, index and speed, DPS, time in breakouts, turns and underwater. In short, the information recorded in a small unit placed inside a swimmer’s cap, is transmitted immediately to an iPad. This data gives coach and swimmer the ability to track training, diagnose weaknesses and monitor progress. Additionally, motion analysis software syncs video with the power of acceleration and speed data. The resulting frame by frame output clearly indicates which movements help a swimmer gain or lose speed within their strokes and skills.

Education and training/entrance requirements

Swimming Instructors must complete formal training. A current CPR certificate and a Working with Children check is also required. Be at least 16 years old with a reasonable level of fitness and swimming ability. Hold a current CPR certificate issued by a Registered Training Organisation. Hold a current Working with Children check or equivalent. Licensing is mandatory for anyone engaging, or intending to engage in child-related work as an employee or volunteer with children under the age of 18. Achieve a Statement of Attainment with the Swimming and Water Safety Teacher (SISSS00112) skill set through a Registered Training Organisation.

To teach swimming in Australia you would need to gain your AUSTSWIM Teacher Licence. You must pass a Swimming and Water Safety course, be 17 years or older and a strong swimmer to get your licence.

Employment Opportunities

Employment of swimming teachers and coaches is projected to grow about as fast as the average for all occupations. Rising participation in sport at school and in the community generally, as well as the growing interest in professional sport, are likely increase demand for swimming teachers and coaches.

 

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