Radio Presenter

   Information, Media and Telecommunications


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Media Presenter
Radio Producer

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Artistic or CreativeService or PersuadingSkill Level 2Skill Level 3

Skill Level 4Skill Level 5

Radio Producers and Presenters, part of a larger industry group of all media producers and presenters, are responsible for much of the administrative work involved in radio production. They also often speak on-air, host radio shows, and interview guests. Future Growth Decline

Radio presenters are the public voice of commercial, public and community radio stations. They compile and present radio programs to the public on a range of topics and with a specific musical or topical focus that may vary according to the type of station for which they work or their particular skills or areas of interest. Their on-air presentation may focus more on a particular style of music, on interviewing and talkback, or on a specific topic like sports, cooking, current affairs or gardening.

Alternative names: Media Presenter, Announcer, Broadcaster, Radio and Television Announcer, Disc Jockey, DJ, News Reader, Radio Announcer and Television Presenter.

Specialisations:  


Knowledge, skills and attributes  Sound Check

Radio presenters need:

  • Active listening

  • Research, interviewing and interpersonal skills

  • Reading comprehension

  • Use of logic, reasoning, and critical thinking

  • a strong on-air personality

  • confidence

  • a suitable voice for radio

  • good communication and public speaking skills

  • the ability to work under pressure

Duties and tasks

  • announce programmes, music and entertainment items

  • read commercials, both live and pre-recorded

  • read news bulletins

  • provide station identification, time, weather and community announcements

  • introduce live performances

  • conduct interviews and host talkback programmes

  • make live action commentary on sporting events, politics, and social and economic matters

  • work off-camera in television announcing programmes

  • host panel shows and live variety shows

  • interview personalities at special events, or in studios for live or taped broadcasts

  • introduce performers and host special events

  • write their own scriptsCoordinating a staff of production experts

  • Developing radio shows and designing the outline of specific episodes

  • Editing productions for time and quality

  • Inviting and interviewing guests to air opinions

  • Making special announcements (emergency and otherwise) as needed throughout the program

  • Managing radio and other audio productions

  • Researching current stories on which to report or comment upon

Working conditionsEditing

Radio Producers and Presenters usually work at radio stations or larger media conglomerates. Their work may be on-air or more behind the scenes in nature. Radio presenters usually work for a specific radio station, which may be located either in the same location as their broadcasting facility, or somewhere completely different. Most radio stations are located in cities and major towns, although some may be located in smaller, regional areas.

Because radio is a 24-hour phenomenon, some radio presenters may be required to work outside standard business hours. For example, they may present a breakfast program or a late-night program. However, many radio stations also pre-record programs that are broadcast late at night.

Tools and technologies

Radio presenters need to be familiar with a radio broadcasting mixing desk and the equipment that accompanies it, such as CD or vinyl record players, external phone lines, and computers. They need to be aware of on-air broadcasting techniques, and may also need to be familiar with digital or analogue recording and sound editing techniques, such as those used when compiling news stories or other radio presentations


Education and training/entrance requirementsReading


It may be possible to become a radio presenter without any formal qualifications, as many radio presenters are employed by broadcasters because they may have a high profile in a field related to the area in which they present, such as the sporting or popular music industries. However, entry into this occupation may be improved by obtaining a formal qualification in broadcasting or a related area.

The Certificate III in Media, Diploma of Screen and Media (Radio) and the Advanced Diploma of Screen and Media (Radio Broadcasting) are offered at State Training Providers and other registered training organisations throughout Australia.

Most universities offer relevant courses in broadcasting, media, and communications.

You can also complete a traineeship. The community radio program maker/presenter or radio producer/presenter traineeships usually take 12 months to complete.

 


Did You Know?

The World Radio Day is on 13th February  

NFSA

WRD

 

Radio Producer
Leisure and Entertainment

Artistic or CreativeService or PersuadingSkill Level 2Skill Level 3

Skill Level 4Skill Level 5

 

Radio producers create and develop radio programs, and oversee the technical and organisational aspects of their production. They generate and research ideas for programs, source on-air contributors, write and develop scripts, select music for the show and listen to recordings to edit them Future Growth Decline into stories or segments. Radio producers may also present programs on-air, or manage the presenters for pre-recorded or live broadcast content. They check the copyright and legal guidelines of media content usage, brief on-air or technical staff about particular recording or broadcast requirements, and archive material that has been broadcast. Radio producers are needed all over the state on commercial and community stations.

Microphone



Knowledge, skills and attributes

A radio producer needs:

  • an interest in broadcast media, particularly radio

  • organisational skills

  • creativity and ingenuity

  • problem-solving skills

  • the ability to motivate others

  • strong communication and negotiation skills

Working conditionsat desk

Radio producers work in the production facilities of radio stations. These facilities may or may not be attached to the station's broadcasting facilities. They may also be required to travel to record radio news or other stories live on-location. They work regular hours, but may be expected to work long hours when working to a deadline, and may need to work late hours if they are producing a show that is broadcast live in a late-night slot.

Tools and technologies

Radio producers use a range of radio broadcasting equipment, including multi-channel sound and mixing desks, CD and other media players, and both studio and portable microphones for recording on location. They also use sound recording and editing software, and computers with music editing software.
 
Education and training/entrance requirements

To become a radio producer, you usually need to complete a VET qualification or degree in broadcasting, media, communications or a related area.

The Diploma of Screen and Media (Radio) and the Advanced Diploma of Screen and Media (Radio Broadcasting) are offered at State Training Providers and other registered training organisations throughout Australia.

Most universities offer relevant courses.

You can also complete a traineeship. The radio producer/presenter traineeship usually takes 12 months to complete.

 

 

 

Media Presenter
   Information, Media and Telecommunications

Service or PersuadingClerical or OrganisingSkill Level 3Skill Level 4Skill Level 5

Media presenters host and present a variety of radio, television and live programmes, and web-based programs including live talkback, sports programs, interviews and news and weather bulletins. They also present music programs, covering all types of music formats, including live concert broadcasts, music and chat programmes, interview and talkback programmes. They may also present rock and classical music concerts that are broadcast live to air, and pre-recorded programmes such as documentary and music specials. Future Growth Decline

 

Alternative names: Announcer, Broadcaster, Radio and Television Announcer, Disc Jockey, DJ, News Reader, Radio Announcer and Television Presenter

Specialisations: sports commentator, disc jockey, newsreader, talkback announcer and political commentator

Knowledge, skills and attributes   

  • clear speaking voice with good command of English or the language in which you are presenting

  • broad general knowledge

  • interest and knowledge in current affairs and/or music

  • technical ability to operate broadcasting equipment

  • able to work under pressure and remain calm

  • good communication skills

  • willing to work in country areas

  • confidence and an outgoing personality

  • excellent speaking voice and presentation skills

  • interviewing skills

  • the ability to multi-task.

        Media Presenter
(Source: Good Universities Guide)

Duties and Tasks

Media presenters may perform the following tasks:

  • announce programmes, music and entertainment items

  • read commercials, both live and pre-recorded

  • read news bulletins

  • provide station identification, time, weather and community announcements

  • introduce live performances

  • conduct interviews and host talkback programmes

  • make live action commentary on sporting events, politics, and social and economic matters and other live-to-air broadcasts

  • work off-camera in television announcing programmes

  • host panel shows and live variety shows

  • interview personalities at special events, or in studios for live or taped broadcasts

  • introduce performers and host special events

  • be briefed by researchers, or prepare your own scripts and interview questions

  • meet with producers or the production team to go through the running order of the program

  • announce guests, music and entertainment items

  • work with studio audiences

  • listen and react to instructions from producers, directors or floor managers.

Working conditions

As a media presenter you might have a regular on-air time slot, but you may also work irregular hours pre-recording interviews and researching stories. Media presenters may be required to work irregular hours, including weekends. On-camera presenters need to be well groomed. Specialist presenters, such as sports and political commentators, should have a solid knowledge of the subject they are presenting.

You would work in a TV or radio studio, as well as in the field conducting interviews and presenting live-to-air programs. You may be required to travel at short notice.

Tools and technologies

Media presenters need to be familiar with the recording equipment either TV cameras, sound equipment, and radio. They need to be aware of on-air broadcasting techniques, and may also need to be familiar with digital or analogue recording and sound editing techniques, such as those used when compiling news stories for TV or radio presentations.

Video

BTN
Video of Behind the scenes at BTN (4m)
(Source: BTN)

Education and training/entrance requirements

You can work as a media presenter without formal qualifications. However, the majority of media presenters begin their careers in other roles in media, such as program production, journalism or research. Most entry level roles in the media will require a university degree in media, communication or journalism. To get into these degree courses you usually need to gain your senior secondary school certificate or equivalent with English.

You will probably get some informal training on the job. Entry to this occupation may be improved if you have qualifications.

You may like to consider a VOC qualification in media or screen and media. Applicants may be required to attend an audition or an interview. As subjects and prerequisites can vary between institutions, you should contact your chosen institution for further information. You may be able to study through distance education.

You can also become a media presenter through a traineeship in Media or Screen and Media.

Entry requirements may vary, but employers generally require Year 10.

Alternatively, you can become a media presenter by studying media, communication or journalism at university. To get into these courses you usually need to gain your HSC/ACT Year 12 with English. Applicants may be required to attend an audition or an interview. Most universities in Australia offer degrees in these areas. Universities have different prerequisites and some have flexible entry requirements or offer external study.

Educational and community radio stations are mainly staffed by volunteers. They offer you experience and often conduct their own short courses or offer opportunities for you to gain credit towards training package qualifications. Contact your local station or the Community Broadcasting Association of Australia for more details.

Entry level roles in the media are extremely competitive. You should try to gain some experience by volunteering or undertaking an internship in community, university or commercial media.


Additional Information

Once you are employed, you may be able to develop, and have recognised, additional skills under the Screen and Media Training Package that will expand your career opportunities within this industry.

Employment Opportunities

Media presenters work for radio and television stations and advertising production houses. Competition is very strong for any positions offered. There are often more vacancies in country radio stations, which is where inexperienced media presenters usually begin their careers. Successful applicants are often those with knowledge in special areas of interest such as sport, music or drama.

Employment of media presenters is projected to remain neutral. Declining revenue for all forms of media organisations has led to less demand for all workers in the media. However, media organisations will still need presenters. Employment prospects are likely to be better for presenters who can research and write some of their own material, and who have experience in more than one type of media.



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