Journalist

   Information, Media and Telecommunications

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Print Journalist
Radio Journalist

Science Journalist
Sports Commentator

Television Journalist

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Service or PersuadingClerical or OrganisingArtistic or CreativeAnalytic or ScientificSkill Level 4Skill Level 5

Journalists research, write and edit news reports, commentaries and features for newspapers, magazines, electronic media and radio or television stations.

Journalists usually start as cadets and report routine events. In newspapers and on radio and Future Growth Static television, most reporters are expected to be 'generalists' who are able to cover almost any topic of interest.

With experience and sometimes further training, journalists may perform a variety of tasks according to their area of specialisation. Journalists may also work as editors.

ANZSCO ID: 2124

Alternative names: Reporters or Correspondents

Specialisations: Columnist, Feature Writer, Leader Writer, News Reporter, Roundsperson, Sports Commentator
    

Columnist
A columnist writes a regular segment within their particular interest category (e.g. gardening, fashion, politics).

Feature Writer
A feature writer writes detailed stories or presents commentaries on specific news topics.

Leader Writer
A leader writer discusses news topics in the editorial columns of newspapers or magazines.

Headline News

News Reporter
A news reporter reports on day-to-day news events (e.g. crime, education, health, sport).

Roundsperson
A roundsperson reports and discusses a specialised area (e.g. politics, economics, education).

Knowledge, skills and attributesNote-taking

  • able to write clear, concise, objective and accurate material quickly

  • good general knowledge

  • interested in current events

  • aptitude to learn keyboard and shorthand skills

  • able to speak clearly with confidence when working on radio and television

  • excellent communication and people skills

  • good listening and questioning skills

  • empathy and tact

  • good writing and research skills
    confidence and a clear speaking voice

  • persistence and motivation

Duties and Tasks

Journalists may perform the following tasks: Newspapers

  • gather news and information by interviewing people and attending events

  • undertake research to provide background information for articles using online and in-house sources

  • assess the suitability of reports and articles for publication or broadcasting, within an established style and format, and edit as necessary

  • research stories, using online and in-house sources

  • build networks of contacts in your focus areas

  • generate ideas for stories, based on leads or your own research

  • gather news and information by interviewing people or attending briefings or press conferences

  • write articles for hardcopy or online publications, or social media content

  • follow established style and format guidelines, and edit as necessary

  • prepare interview questions and conduct live and pre-recorded interviews

  • operate digital recording and editing equipment

  • present news on air (television and radio).

  • write articles that comment on or interpret news events, some of which may put forward a point of view on behalf of the publication

In many radio or TV jobs you would be part of a production team which could include other journalists, researchers, editors, broadcast assistants and producers.

Journalist interviewing
(Source: YourCareer)

Working conditions

All journalists are required to understand the laws of defamation, contempt and copyright. They may have to work long and irregular hours and are often under pressure to meet deadlines.

Journalists may work indoors and carry out interviews by telephone or may have to work outdoors in all kinds of weather. Travel is sometimes required.

You would work in a newsroom, using a telephone and computer. You might also spend some of your time out-and-about doing interviews and covering stories. Outside broadcasts take place in all weather conditions. The work could involve local, national or international travel, often at short notice.


Tools and technologies

Journalists use computers for research and writing, but may also use notepads and pens, dictaophones or portable sound and video recording devices, and may even be involved in the use of photographic and digital video equipment.

Education and training/entrance requirements

To become a journalist, you usually need to study a degree with a major in journalism or a related field, followed by a one-year graduate cadetship involving on the job training.

Alternatively, you can become a journalist by completing a 3-year cadetship, during which you receive instruction and gain experience in practical journalism under the supervision of senior journalists.

Cadetships are offered by national, regional and local media organisations. Entry requirements vary, but you will need to demonstrate a passion for journalism and a flair for writing. Competition is very strong.

Employment Opportunities

Most journalists work for country, metropolitan and suburban newspapers, magazines, radio and television stations. They may also work for press agencies. Due to changes in the industry, it is common for journalists to work on a freelance basis. Others move into publicity roles in government departments, work as press secretaries for government ministers or work in related fields such as advertising, marketing and public relations.

Technological changes have increased the speed of information exchange, leading to a more interpretative role for journalists. This has increased the demand for journalists with expertise in specialist fields such as economics and political science.

Factors that influence employment range from the number, size and economic viability of media organisations to the use of modern technology and the degree of networking and resource sharing between organisations.


Sports Commentator
   Information, Media and Telecommunications

Analytic or Scientific
Skill Level 4Skill Level 5

 

Sports commentators discuss and describe sporting matches or events for the benefit of viewers or listeners not able to be there live. Future Growth Static
A sports commentator describes the progress of play during broadcasts of sporting events and explains the technicalities and the tactics of the sport to the audience.

Sports commentators describe the action and provide colorful commentary for broadcasts of sporting events. They can work in television or radio or for an internet media outlet. Former coaches and players are hired for commentary jobs while other announcers handle the play-by-play duties.

Overall, sports commentators are very knowledgeable sports fanatics who provide coverage for games or competitions in a certain sport. While some commentators may only provide on-air commentary, others may specialize in conducting research or supervising the production of different sporting events. The road towards becoming a sports commentator may be lined with steep competition, but this career is the ideal path for individuals with superb communications skills who have a passion for helping others enjoy sports.

ANZSCO ID: 212499

Alternative names: Sports broadcaster, announcer, broadcaster, sportscaster,

Specialisations: a particular sport or code

Sports Commentators at Olympics
Channel 7s Sports Commentators at Olympics
(Source: Mediaweek)

Knowledge, skills and attributes     

To become a sports commentator, you would need:

  • excellent communication skills
  • a clear voice and good pronunciation
  • good presentation skills
  • confidence when talking to large numbers of people
  • a genuine interest in sports
  • a knowledge of one or more sports, the teams that are playing and their players
  • the ability to quickly summarize what's happening during the game.
  • The ability to offer commentary on the game.
  • The ability to banter with your on-air colleagues.
  • Knowledge of how the particular form of broadcasting works
  • to remain impartial during commentary.
        

In order to be successful, sports commentators must have exceptional public speaking skills with a pleasing voice, good pronunciation, solid timing, and witty personality. Most sports commentators must write their own material for presenting on the air, so writing skills are a must. Research skills are important because sports commentators need to find up-to-date information on the latest sports topics for commenting on during the broadcast. Sports commentators should have excellent interpersonal skills to make interviewing guests, interacting with other broadcasters, and answering phone calls on air more comfortable. It’s also essential that sports commentators in radio have the technical skills to operate computers and editing equipment.

Sports commentators must combine all of those attributes so the things they say engage the audience and come across as friendly and intelligent. They should let their personalities shine through but not to the extent that they interfere with viewer and listener enjoyment of the game.

Sports Announcer
(Source: Balance Careers)

Duties and Tasks

As a sports commentator, you might:

  • research the participants and their clubs or teams before the event
  • commentate on the build up and interview relevant people before the start
  • work with the production team to plan how the event will be run
  • take direction from the producer during the match or event
  • describe the run of play in depth for listeners
  • have relevant statistics to hand for in-between periods of play
  • summarise what has happened after the event and offer expert opinion on it.

 

Cameo - Life on the Job - Aaron Bryans

LOTJ

“I had always wanted to be a writer while also having a passion for sport. After visiting Open Day at Curtin, I was tossing up between sports science and journalism. I opted for the latter and never looked back.

“I graduated in 2015 with extensive print, radio and TV journalism knowledge and ended up getting a job with the ABC shortly afterwards,” says the young reporter.

In his role with the public broadcaster, Bryans interviews athletes, cuts and archives audio, researches facts on players and teams, and studies numbers ahead of weekend commentary calls for games (Bryans hints that if you want to be a sports commentator, you have to be prepared to give up your Saturdays and Sundays).

“Alongside commentating, weekend days can end up being 12-plus hours long depending on other factors, such as hosting or producing the ABC’s talkback radio show, SportsTalk, or hosting or producing national AFL games.

“During the summer we also have our National Grandstand radio show on the weekends alongside our cricket and basketball coverage.”
The ABC is home to some of Australia’s best sports journalists and commentators, and tuning in to National Grandstand or SportsTalk throughout the year is a revered pastime for many a discerning sports fan.

“From a commentary aspect, the ABC prides itself on its in-depth knowledge of players, teams and history of the sport,” Bryans says.
“Our commentary is descriptive and informative, focusing on the game, not the commentary team itself. We want listeners to know the score and where the ball is at all times while allowing the experts to delve deeper into the analytical aspect of the game.”

Bryans discovered his passion for sports journalism after racking up hours of work experience in the media industry, which helped him to figure out the areas of journalism he excelled at and enjoyed most.

He says his work experience, which was often organised through Curtin, gave him an advantage when it came to applying for graduate roles.

“When there are so many graduates competing for a position, the easiest way to stand above the rest is to have already done some work within the industry.

“Through networking and relationships with my tutors, I was able to tee up paid and unpaid work with The West Australian, The Sunday Times, Xpress Magazine, ScienceNetwork WA [now Particle], RTRFM and the Fremantle Dockers during my degree.
“The biggest factor in achieving these opportunities was work ethic, taught through real-time newsroom environments during my degree, which stressed speed and efficiency while also striving for accuracy.”

He says working with the Fremantle Dockers was a particular highlight of the journalism course.

Aaron Bryans

“The Sports Media Production/Docker TV unit at Curtin is an incredible opportunity developed through Curtin’s partnership with the Fremantle Dockers. It runs as an advanced work experience unit that enables students to work for the Dockers, have their work edited and published for their portfolio and expose them to the lifestyle of a media worker in the Australian Rules Football landscape.
“It also gave me a chance to work with a team of students, each with unique talents such as writing, filming, editing, lighting and audio.”

While he’s only just cut his teeth in the industry, Bryans has already kicked a few career goals, including assisting with the coverage of the 2016 and 2017 AFL Grand Final, won by the Western Bulldogs and Richmond Tigers respectively.

Although he’s a Richmond fan, Bryans says he was more impressed by the Bulldogs’ 2016 grand final win than the victory of the boys in yellow and black last year.

“As a Richmond supporter, the 2017 grand final was a huge day for me, but as any neutral supporter would tell you, the game itself wasn’t overly entertaining. The Bulldogs 2016 premiership, however, was an incredibly exciting and unpredictable tale – hearing from fans who’d waited decades to see their team reach this point, and being in the crowd when the siren finally sounded for a team who finished 7th on the AFL ladder but won the premiership.”

As well as covering national AFL games, he has also produced Ashes cricket coverage for National Grandstand and worked courtside at National Basketball League games.

Bryans will be back in Melbourne this year for the 2018 AFL Grand Final, where he will cover the game on social media and assist with player interviews and photography. He’ll no doubt also be soaking up the atmosphere and perhaps brushing shoulders with some of the game’s superstars.

He doesn’t take any of it for granted and says there’s still much for him to learn, including the art of calling an AFL grand final game. As long as he’s challenged, he says he’ll never forfeit his passion for sports journalism.

“The best part about the job for me personally is how it’s constantly challenging. I always found with previous jobs I’d get bored once I’d mastered a specific aspect of it.

“In journalism, your job is constantly evolving. I started out as a producer and over the years have moved into hosting and commentating. There are always new things to learn and new stories to delve into.”
(Source: Curtin University)

Working conditions

As a sports commentator you would work irregular long hours. Generally you would be commentating live at sporting events, which often take place in the evenings and at weekends.

Sports commentators work most prominently in broadcast booths at stadiums and other sporting venues. They may also work in an office-type setting while preparing for broadcasts.

You would travel locally, nationally and internationally to wherever the sport is being played. Depending on the sport you may be in a commentary box or outside in all sort of weathers. You may also spend time in a studio pre-recordng interviews or promotional pieces.

Tools and technologies

Aaron Bryans at production desk
Aaron Bryans at production desk at ABC Radio Perth
(Source: Curtin University)

Instant replay is an example of the remarkable technology being used in sports today. With this technology, officials are able to see exactly what happened, providing a second perspective on sports events.

Sensor tools are often used to analyze whether a goal is valid or not. It is often used in cases where the naked eye cannot truly tell if a ball went past the goal line. Different sports use varying sensor tools. For example, cricket’s Hawk-Eye technology analyzes sound to determine if the ball smashed into the bat before it was caught. Hawk-Eye is also used to determine where the ball would have landed if it had not hit a player’s foot. This establishes whether the ball was unfairly blocked from striking the wicket. On the other hand, tennis sensor tools use laser beams to determine whether the tennis ball went out of bounds or not. Sensor technologies help to accurately determine the position of the ball at a given time.

Nobody uses a stopwatch when timing a race anymore. This means that differences in reaction time no longer affect the precision and consistency of a racing event. In many races today, the starter pistol is linked to a clock. Once the pistol goes off, the clock immediately starts timing the race. On the other hand, swimming uses a touch pad placed at the finish lanes as well as wearable inertial sensors to determine performance. Many racing events also use laser beams and photographs to determine winners.

RFID chips are often used to time individual contestants in an event. The devices use antennas that relay wireless signals. RFID chips are often used in long distance races to help sports commentators and viewers track the exact locations of contestants during a race. There are two types of chips used in races: active and passive chips. Active chips have an in-built battery or power source and can determine the exact time a participant crosses a specific line. Passive chips can only be used with sensors placed in a mat because they do not have an in-built power source.

Education and training/entrance requirements

You can work as a sports commentator without formal qualifications. However, many sports commentators begin their careers in other roles in media, such as journalism or research. Most entry level roles in the media will require a university degree in media, communication or journalism. To get into these degree courses you usually need to gain your senior secondary school certificate or equivalent with English.

Many sports commentators are ex-professionals in their chosen sports, who have retired and moved into commentating, thereby making it harder for others without the sporting experience to get roles.

Entry level roles in the media are extremely competitive. You should try to gain some experience by volunteering or undertaking an internship in community, university or commercial media.

ABC Grandstand
ABC's Grandstand Commentators

 

Print Journalist
   Information, Media and Telecommunications

Clerical or OrganisingAnalytic or ScientificSkill Level 4Skill Level 5

Print Journalists collect and analyse facts about newsworthy events by interview, investigation and observation and write stories for newspapers, magazines or journals. Future Growth Static

ANZSCO ID: 212413

Specialisations: Columnist, Feature Writer, Leader Writer, Newspaper Reporter.

Duties and Tasks

  • Collects and analyses facts about newsworthy events from interviews, printed matter, investigations and observations.

  • Writes news reports, commentaries, articles and feature stories for newspapers, magazines, and journals on topics of public interest.


Education and training/entrance requirements

You usually need a bachelor degree in journalism, followed by a one-year cadetship involving on the job training, to work as a Print Journalist. Training is also available through VET (Vocational Education and Training).

 

 

Did You Know?
Superman's alter ego, Clark Kent, was a reporter for a newspaper called The Daily Planet.

Superman Stamp


 

Radio Journalist
   Information, Media and Telecommunications

Clerical or OrganisingAnalytic or ScientificSkill Level 4Skill Level 5

Radio Journalists collect and analyse facts about newsworthy events by interview, investigation and observation and write stories for radio news or current affairs programs. Future Growth Static

ANZSCO ID: 212414

Duties and Tasks

  • Collects and analyses facts about newsworthy events from interviews, printed matter, investigations and observations.
  • Writes news reports, commentaries, articles and feature stories for radio on topics of public interest.


Education and training/entrance requirements


You usually need a bachelor degree in journalism, followed by a one-year cadetship involving on the job training, to work as a Radio Journalist. Training is also available through VET (Vocational Education and Training).


Television Journalist
   Information, Media and Telecommunications

Clerical or OrganisingAnalytic or ScientificSkill Level 4Skill Level 5

 

Television Journalists collect and analyse facts about newsworthy events by interview, investigation and observation and write stories for television news or current affairs programs. Future Growth Static

ANZSCO ID: 212416


Duties and Tasks

  • Collects and analyses facts about newsworthy events from interviews, printed matter, investigations and observations.

  • Writes news reports, commentaries, articles and feature stories for television on topics of public interest.


Education and training/entrance requirements

You usually need a bachelor degree in journalism, followed by a one-year cadetship involving on-the-job training, to work as a Television Journalist. Training is also available through VET (Vocational Education and Training).

Music Critic
   Information, Media and Telecommunications


Clerical or OrganisingArtistic or CreativeSkill Level 3Skill Level 4Skill Level 5

A music critic is employed by major print media publishers to report on the performing arts. Local areas usually have part-time critics who report regularly on local and visiting artists in the local press. The usual tasks of a music critic include writing reviews of newly released cd's and records and conducting interviews with musicians, performers, and, bands. Future Growth Static

Music Critics are employed by newspapers and blogs to interview musicians, review performances and albums, and sometimes cover music news. Although most publications have a few full-time Music Critics on staff, due to the increasing importance of music blogs, more and more critics work freelance.

The great thing about the music industry is that there is an endless input of new songs and continued discovery of new talents. As long as there are songs to be written, artists who perform it and people who listen and appreciate them, the opportunity for a music critic is vast. The road to becoming a respected music critic comes with its own set of obstacles. Rejection from publications is one that you will face and must overcome. Nevertheless, if you succeed, this career path will bring you both professional and personal satisfaction.

ANZSCO ID: 212499

Alternative names: Music journalists; Music writers

Knowledge, skills and attributes     

  • Not only should you be a good writer, but also be a good communicator and interviewer.

  • Be familiar with various types of music.

  • Have ample knowledge of music history and notable musicians whether past or present.

  • Always be updated on upcoming artists and newly released songs.

  • Be fair, honest and impartial in your opinions.

  • If you're a freelancer, ask whether you will be paid per word or per article.

  • Build your portfolio      

Music Critic
 (Source: Careers in Music)

Duties and Tasks

As with any journalist, the job of a music critic is to write articles based on the information they have gathered. They listen to cd's, attend concerts and talk to musicians in order to get more input for the material they are going to write. The articles they create are based on both fact and their personal impartial reaction to the music, song or artist. They inform consumers which albums are worth buying and which artists are worth seeing.

Working conditions

"Although some Music Critics work in offices, the majority work from home, so it can be isolating. As Patrin mentioned above, a Critic’s daily schedule varies depending on the workload from a few hours of writing a busy day where deadlines must be met. He says, “It can be pretty indoorsy, though part of the job can and will involve going out to live shows (often for free!) so that’s an incentive in itself.”

"Of a typical day on the job, Music Critic Nate Patrin says, “I freelance, so it’s a mix of things — listening to new albums as I get them, checking social media/blogs for info and leads on things people are talking about or just random stuff that seems interesting, pitching story ideas/reviews to editors, and doing the writing, research, and interview work itself.

“Even on the slowest days, I’m usually doing at least two or three of these things during working hours, which can be a few hours of the day or the majority of my waking hours depending on deadlines and workload.”

Since the job involves a lot of time behind the computer, day-to-day work can be solitary. As to people he works with, Patrin says, “I contact Publicists every so often, but the vast majority of my working relationships are with Editors.” (Source: Careers in Music)

Education and training/entrance requirements

It may be possible to build a following as a music critic through online reviewing without any specific education, although employment in this field typically requires a bachelor's degree, and most music critics have a relevant master's degree. Many music critics write on a freelance or part-time basis, providing articles to multiple publications.

Music critics combine music studies with journalism. They may write for a variety of print and online publications covering specialized genres or broad ranges of music. A bachelor's degree in journalism or in a music-related field, such as music theory or musical performance, is considered the minimum education for a job as a music critic; however, many critics have earned a master's degree. Writers with a love for music and in-depth knowledge of music artistry may want to explore this path.

 

Science Journalist
    Information, Media and Telecommunications

Clerical or OrganisingAnalytic or ScientificSkill Level 5

As a science journalist you will be reporting on some of the latest discoveries or advancements in science. This might involve writing for a newspaper or magazine, talking on radio or reporting on a television program as a broadcast journalist. You have a big job researching science stories, talking with people, analysing data and presenting the information in a way that is easily understood by the public. You may be writing for an online newsletter, print magazine or doing a radio or television broadcast so you need to be familiar across all the different media forms. FutureGrowthModerate

Most of a journalist’s time is spent talking to people to get information about a story either over the phone or face to face and working to short deadlines. You might come up with your own idea for a story or you might follow up information sent to you in a media release.

Being a journalist requires an excellent understanding of English and grammar. Your job is to communicate information accurately and concisely. Spelling and facts need to be correct otherwise your credibility as a reliable journalist could be damaged.

Having strong skills in mathematics will also be useful to understand scientific concepts or to interpret graphs and data. Lots of stories often come from data results so you need to understand them and accurately report on them. If you enjoy writing and learning new things, then a career as a science journalist could be for you.

Science writers cover fields which are undergoing rapid advances and changes, giving them the chance to report on exciting and ground-breaking developments

As a science writer you'll research, write and edit scientific news, articles and features, for business, trade and professional publications, specialist scientific and technical journals, and the general media, including television, radio and blogs. As a Scientific writer, you report on scientific news for the media and take on a more investigatory, critical role. Science writing for non-media outlets involves communicating scientific research to a professional or lay audience, either for journals, promotional brochures and websites or as press releases.

Some science writing jobs might have an element of editing or broader communications responsibilities in addition to researching and writing. Science writers need to understand complex scientific information, theories and practices. You should be able to write in clear, concise and accurate language that can be understood by the general public.

ANZSCO ID: 2124

Alternative names: Science writer, Science Communicator, Scientific Journalist,

Specialisations: TV, Radio, Social Media,

Knowledge, skills and attributes  

  • excellent written and oral communication skills
  • a strong interest in science
  • the ability to think logically and understand complex ideas and data
  • good organisational and time management skills
  • ability to work under pressure to deadlines
  • resilience, flexibility, persistence and self-motivation
  • a sound understanding of standard computer programs.organising and curating public events and exhibits for science organisations  

12 Quality Indicators for Science Communication
(Source: Quest Project)

Duties and Tasks

The particular activities you'll undertake depend on the nature of your role and who you're writing for. Common activities include:

  • producing articles for publication in print and online according to agreed style, and keeping to strict deadlines
  • conducting interviews with scientists, doctors and academics and establishing a network of industry experts
  • attending academic and press conferences
  • visiting research establishments
  • reading and researching specialist media and literature, e.g. scientific papers, company reports, newspapers, magazines and journals, press releases and internet resources including social media
  • attending meetings or taking part in conference calls with clients, scientists or other writers
  • meeting with colleagues to plan the content of a document or publication
  • conducting reference searches
  • reviewing and amending work in response to editor feedback
  • selecting appropriate artwork to accompany articles
  • occasionally reading page proofs from printers and checking colour proofs.
  • broadcasting science on TV and radio
  • publicising science through websites and social media
  • editing and publishing scientific content.      

Working conditions

Working hours vary, although if you're working in-house you'll typically be working 9am to 5pm. However, science writers sometimes have to work long hours to meet deadlines, so you'll need a flexible approach to working extra to accommodate breaking news and in-depth, time consuming projects. Work is primarily office based but visits to meet with clients or to interview experts may be required.

Writers working for smaller and non-media organisations will likely receive informal, on-the-job training. This includes receiving feedback from editors, peers and clients, and learning from more experienced colleagues. In general, writers must be open minded, able to accept criticism and willing to make changes to their writing style. As a writer, you'll also learn to improve your writing through regularly reading the work of other good scientific communicators.

It's important to keep up to date with any advances in the science industry. Attending science-related conferences and gaining membership to any relevant professional bodies are a way of maintaining an ongoing knowledge of the industry.


Science writers often work on a freelance basis, putting forward ideas for articles to science editors and by getting 'on the books' as a regular freelance writer for one or more organisations. If this applies to you, you may work from home or travel to company offices if you've been contracted for a certain amount of work. Jobs are available in cities throughout Australia.
 
Travel during the working day is common. Writers may also travel internationally to attend conferences and visit clients.

Tools and technologies

Science Journalists use computers for research and writing, but may also use notepads and pens, dictaophones or portable sound and video recording devices, and may even be involved in the use of photographic and digital video equipment.

Education and training/entrance requirements

Broadly speaking, there are two routes you can take to become a science writer:

  • move from a science career into writing
  • move from journalism into specialist science writing.

Some science writers have a science degree and sometimes even a postgraduate science qualification. A scientist can either start writing immediately upon graduation, or can move into the industry after several years of scientific research.

Sometimes writers with science degrees take on a further postgraduate qualification in journalism or scientific communications in order to further their scientific writing careers. These courses aim to help those from a science-based background distil complex information to a level that the general public can understand.

Degrees specifically in science communication are available from a range of Australian universities.

Employment Opportunities

 Jobs in science communication are generally on the rise - fewer science journalism roles are on offer, however.

 Political Satirist
   Information, Media and Telecommunications

Analytic or ScientificArtistic or CreativeSkill Level 4Skill Level 5



ANZSCO ID: 212499

 

A great example from Sammy J:

I Can’t Call Australia Home | Sammy J (S4 Ep12) 6 May 2021
https://youtu.be/UW-C0PAocBU

 

 


Journalist

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Newspaper Editor

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3D Animator

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Social Media Manager

Journalist

Applications Programmer

Film Producer

Photographer

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Cinematographer

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Multimedia Specialist

Newspaper Editor

Games Developer

IT Analyst

Radio Producer Presenter

Writer

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Broadcasting Technician

3D Animator

Archivist

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Social Media Manager

Journalist

Applications Programmer

Film Producer

Photographer

Web Designer

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Graphic Designer

Multimedia Specialist

Newspaper Editor

Games Developer

IT Analyst

Radio Producer Presenter

 

Writer

Illustrator

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Broadcasting Technician

3D Animator

Archivist

Librarian

Social Media Manager

Journalist

Applications Programmer

Film Producer

Photographer

Web Designer

Cinematographer

Publisher

Graphic Designer

Multimedia Specialist

Newspaper Editor

Games Developer

IT Analyst

Radio Producer Presenter

Writer

Illustrator

Director

Broadcasting Technician

3D Animator

Archivist

Librarian

Social Media Manager

Journalist

Applications Programmer

Film Producer

Photographer

Web Designer

Cinematographer

Publisher

Graphic Designer

Multimedia Specialist