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Parliamentarians are elected by the people (constituents) of a particular region (such as an electorate) to represent their interests. They make decisions in federal, state or territory parliaments and undertake activities in their local electorates. FutureGrowthModerate

Parliamentarians represent the people of Australia in federal or state parliament by making decisions on their behalf and undertaking community-oriented activities in their electorate. They attend public meetings and events, make speeches in public or to organised groups,and work to develop government policies that represent the views of their electorate. Parliamentarians also attend sittings of parliament, during which time they debate and vote on new laws and changes to existing laws. They may also be placed in charge of a ministry or government department, and take responsibility for the directions that these bodies take under their leadership.


ANZSCO description: Represents the interests of people in a constituency as their elected member to a national, state or territory parliament.

Alternative names: Parliamentarian, Politician, Member of Parliament,

Specialisations: Chief Minister (Aus), Government Minister, Member of the Legislative Assembly (Aus), Member of the Legislative Council (Aus), Premier (Aus), Prime Minister, Senator (Aus), State Parliamentarian


Knowledge, skills and attributes

A parliamentarian needs: House of Representatives

  • knowledge of either state or federal politics

  • conviction in their political beliefs

  • enjoy dealing with issues in current affairs and politics

  • strong communication and networking skills

  • enjoy talking to, working with and helping people

  • public speaking and debating skills - good oral and written communication skills

  • organisational skills

  • prepared to work long hours

  • willing to travel and live away from home when required

  • the ability to make decisions and able to apply sound judgment

  • sound management skills



Duties and Tasks

Parliamentarians may perform the following tasks: Senate

  • present issues for debate and discussion in parliament

  • propose and debate new legislation and changes to existing legislation

  • develop policy that best serves the interests of the public and the electorate

  • investigate matters of concern to the public or particular interest groups

  • present petitions on behalf of concerned interest groups

  • serve on parliamentary committees or enquiries

  • manage an office in their home electorate and in the house of parliament.

Working conditions

Parliamentarians have a high level of personal contact with the public. Elected parliamentarians tend to spend most of their time working with constituents who are seeking assistance with issues such as pensions, taxation, immigration, education, health services, visas and other matters of public concern.

Parliamentarians work in offices, as well as in parliament buildings either in their cities or Canberra, depending on whether they are involved in state or federal politics. They also work at their electorate or political party's offices, and may also work from home. They work long and irregular hours, and may be on call to attend meetings or provide statements to the press. Parliamentarians travel regularly and often between their electorate and either state parliament or federal parliament in Canberra.

Tools and technologies

Parliamentarians use computers and standard office equipment. They may also use laptop computers with wireless internet and mobile phones to stay in touch with key political contacts

Education and training/entrance requirements

Any person who is an Australian citizen over the age of 18 and free from indictable offenses on their criminal record may stand as a candidate to be elected to represent their state or federal electorate in parliament.

In order to become a parliamentarian you need to be elected to parliament. Any member of the community may seek to become a member of parliament by either independent nomination or by becoming a member of a political party and then standing for pre-selection, where they are selected from a group of other candidates by members of their political party to represent the party in parliament.

There are no standard qualification requirements to become an elected official, but it is useful to have a broad educational background. Most members of parliament already have established careers in anything from law or business to agriculture or community services.



Did You Know?

"One of the oldest continuous democracies in the world, the Commonwealth of Australia was created in 1901 when the former British colonies—now the six states—agreed to federate. The democratic practices and principles that shaped the pre-federation colonial parliaments (such as ‘one man, one vote’ and women’s suffrage) were adopted by Australia’s first federal government.

The Australian colonies had inherited an electoral tradition from Britain that included limited franchise and public and plural voting. Abuses such as bribery and intimidation of voters stimulated electoral change. Australia pioneered reforms that underpin the electoral practices of modern democracies.

In 1855, Victoria introduced the secret ballot, which became known throughout the world as ‘the Australian ballot’. In 1856, South Australia eliminated professional and property qualifications and gave the vote to all adult men, and in 1892 gave adult women the vote. In the 1890s the colonies adopted the principle of one vote per person, stopping the practice of plural voting.

Australia’s government is based on a popularly elected parliament with two chambers: the House of Representatives and the Senate. Ministers appointed from these chambers conduct executive government, and policy decisions are made in Cabinet meetings. Apart from the announcement of decisions, Cabinet discussions are not disclosed. Ministers are bound by the principle of Cabinet solidarity, which closely mirrors the British model of Cabinet government responsible to parliament.

Although Australia is an independent nation, Queen Elizabeth II of Great Britain is also formally Queen of Australia. The Queen appoints a Governor-General (on the advice of the elected Australian Government) to represent her. The Governor-General has wide powers, but by convention acts only on the advice of ministers on virtually all matters."
(Source: Australian Government)

Peter Cosgrove

General Peter Cosgrove - 26th Governor General of Australia
(Source: News)

The Conversation 21 June 2016
Read this article to understand the Senate and it's work
(Source: The Conversation)



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Local Government Inspector

Biosecurity Officer

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Naval Officer

Road Worker

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Urban and Regional Planner

Police Officer

Community Corrections

Diplomat

Public Servant

Coroner

Primary Products Inspector

Tourist Information Officer

Transport Services Officer

Meteorologist

Emergency Disaster Planner

Air Force Officer

WHS Officer

Electorate Officer

Park Ranger

Prison Officer

Fisheries Officer

Postal Worker

Local Government Inspector

Biosecurity Officer

Border Force Officer

Naval Officer