Local Government Inspector

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Compliance Officer (Local Government)
Environmental Compliance Officer
Parking Inspector
Swimming Pool & Spa Inspector



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Local government inspectors are responsible for enforcing various council by-laws, parking and traffic regulations and provisions contained in the Local Government Act and other legislation Future Growth Static enforced by councils.

 

Specialisations: Duties performed by inspectors vary among councils depending on where the council is and the inspector's experience and training. For example, an inspector employed by a coastal council is likely to perform duties relating to provisions contained in the Coastal Protection and Boating Acts. In some councils, inspectors perform both traffic and general inspection duties.

Parking Inspector/Officer, Local Laws Officer, Traffic Officer, Ranger - Local Council; and Animal Management/Control Officer.

Knowledge, skills and attributes

  • enjoy working outdoors and willing to work in all types of weather
  • able to deal politely and, at times, firmly with members of the public
  • good communication and conflict resolution skills
  • mature and confident
  • patient, able to show initiative and be discrete
  • able to cope with the physical demands of the job

Duties and Tasks

Inspectors may perform the following tasks:

  • talk with people who dispute council actions
  • issue notices to cut back or remove plant growth that overhangs footpaths and streets, as well as undergrowth from premises
  • issue notices to people found littering
  • patrol streets and parking areas to check that vehicles are legally parked (e.g. have not exceeded maximum parking times)
  • issue notices to people parking illegally
  • provide information to the police on stolen or abandoned vehicles
  • issue notices to people in violation of environmental protection regulations (e.g. lighting an incinerator outside specified times or illegally burning substances such as rubber)
  • catch stray and unregistered dogs and, if possible, notify owners
  • follow up complaints, conduct interviews and issue penalty notices to dog owners who are in violation of the various acts and by-laws
  • keep records of issued notices and payment of penalties
  • attend court to give evidence in support of any prosecutions
  • give timely and courteous advice to the community.

Working conditions

Inspectors mainly work outdoors without direct supervision and may be required to wear a uniform. They may be required to work some evenings, weekends and public holidays, overtime or shifts.

Inspectors have a considerable amount of contact with the public.

Education and training/entrance requirements

You can work as a local government inspector without formal qualifications. You will probably get some informal training on the job.

Entry to this occupation may be improved if you have qualifications. You may like to consider a VOC qualification in local government, specialising in regulatory services or health and environment. As subjects and prerequisites can vary between institutions, you should contact your chosen institution for further information.

You can also become a local government inspector through a traineeship in Local Government (Health and Environment/Regulatory Services).

Entry requirements may vary, but employers generally require Year 10.

To work as a local government inspector, you may need to undergo a National Police Check and medical assessment. You may also need a drivers licence for cars and/or motorcycles. Contact your local council for further information.

Once you are employed, you may be able to develop, and have recognised, additional skills under the Local Government Training Package that will expand your career opportunities within this industry.


Employment Opportunities

Employment opportunities include full-time, part-time and casual work. With experience and sometimes further training, inspectors may progress to the position of chief inspector.

 

Parking Inspector
   Government and Defence

Clerical or OrganisingSkill Level 1Skill Level 2

Parking inspectors patrol streets and parking lots, enforcing local parking restrictions. They check Future Growth Static vehicles for valid parking permits or tickets and record how long vehicles have been in free-parking areas. They issue fines when cars have exceeded maximum parking times or are parked illegally. In some cases they may also arrange to have illegally parked vehicles towed away. While on patrol, parking inspectors are able to keep an eye out for stolen or abandoned vehicles and report them to police. They may also note damaged or faulty signs, traffic lights and other roadside equipment, reporting faults to Main Roads, the local council or another appropriate authority.

Parking inspectors or Traffic Wardens are assigned areas to patrol usually within the Central Business District (CBD). They check that vehicles in this area are legally parked and have not gone over the maximum parking time.

They also check that vehicles are not parked in ways that are dangerous or unsafe for the public.

ANZSCO description: Patrols assigned areas and issues parking infringement notices to owners of vehicles that are illegally parked.

Alternative names: Parking Enforcement Officer, Parking Meter Reader, Parking Officer, Parking Warden, Traffic Warden

Knowledge, skills and attributes

A parking inspector needs:

  • a reasonable level of fitness
  • good communication, interpersonal skills and conflict resolution skills
  • the ability to remain calm in stressful situations
  • the ability to politely deal with potentially hostile or aggressive members of the public
  • to be honest, ethical and reliable
  • enjoy working outdoors and willing to work in all types of weather
  • maturity and confidence
  • initiative, discretion and patience

Parking Inspector writing a ticket

Duties and Tasks

Parking inspectors may perform the following tasks:

  • chalk the tyres of vehicles parked in areas with limited time zones, including meters, to measure the length of time they have been parked
  • issue parking tickets to cars that are over the time limit or parked illegally
  • write reports on booked vehicles
  • keep records of issued notices and payment of penalties
  • organise the impounding of abandoned vehicles
  • present reports as evidence in court cases involving unpaid fines
  • provide directions and guidance to the public.

Working conditions

Parking inspectors are employed by local councils and generally work in larger cities and towns, particularly in the metropolitan region. They work outdoors, in most weather conditions and usually patrol their assigned area on foot. The hours of work may vary, depending on the parking regulations of a particular area. Parking inspectors usually work during business hours during the week, with many also required to work on weekends and public holidays. Some parking inspectors may be required to work shifts, covering 24-hours a day, 7-days a week. They have a high level of contact with the public, and may have to deal with hostility and aggression from some people.


Tools and technologies

Parking inspectors generally work with small hand-held computers which are able to record how long a vehicle has been parked in the same space and print infringement notices. Some parking inspectors may mark the tyres of parked vehicles with chalk to monitor their movement and write infringements by hand, though this is becoming less common. They usually carry two-way radios and/or mobile phones to stay in touch with other inspectors in the area and a central office. Parking inspectors may need to drive between patrol areas. They are generally issued a uniform, including hats and wet-weather gear.


Education and training/entrance requirements

You can become a parking inspector without formal qualifications and get training on the job. However, entry into this occupation may be improved by obtaining a qualification in Local Government.

The Certificate III in Local Government (Regulatory Services) is offered at TAFE Colleges and other registered training organisations throughout Australia.

Individual local government authorities will have their own specific employment requirements. However, you may be required to pass a police check, have a medical assessment and/or hold a current drivers licence.

                                                                                                                                                               A Must Listen...
Listen

JobSpeaker ABC

Park your preconceptions as two inspectors talk about the perks and pitfalls of the job.
Ever wondered the best excuse to get out of a parking ticket?
Hayden and Mo have heard pretty much all of them.
They both work as parking inspectors in Canberra and have seen their fair share of bad parking.
But they told Breakfast host Lish Fejer that there are quite a few bright spots in their day.
Duration: 4min 58sec
Broadcast: Thu 12 Aug 2021, 5:30am

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Urban and Regional Planner

Police Officer

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Diplomat

Public Servant

Coroner

Primary Products Inspector

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Transport Services Officer

Meteorologist

Emergency Disaster Planner

Animal Control Officer

Building Inspector

Air Force Officer

WHS Officer

Electorate Officer

Park Ranger

Prison Officer

Fisheries Officer

Postal Worker

Local Government Inspector

Biosecurity Officer

Border Force Officer

Naval Officer

Road Worker

Army Officer

Parliamentarian

Urban and Regional Planner

Police Officer

Community Corrections

Diplomat

Public Servant

Coroner

Primary Products Inspector

Tourist Information Officer

Transport Services Officer