Surveyor 

   Environments

Menu

Surveyor's Assistant
Surveying Technician/Draftsperson
Licensed / Registered Surveyor

Mine Surveyor

Related Jobs or Working with these Jobs

 

 

Practical or MechanicalClerical or OrganisingNature or RecreationAnalytic or ScientificSkill Level 5

Surveyors assemble and assess land and geographic information which is used for planning and regulation of the land, the sea and related structures. A surveyor collects and measures spatial information about the land and environment, including natural and constructed features such as open pit mines, coastlines, marine floors and underground works. Decline

This information can then be used by geographic information science specialists and cartographers to analyse and model the data, construct maps, plans, files, charts and reports.

A career in surveying can be very diverse and involves travelling and the use of specialised technology. Surveyors can be involved in making measurements in the outdoors or indoors processing data and creating plans and maps. To become a surveyor you must firstly do some study. This is usually undertaken at University and depends what discipline of surveying you would like to undertake and if you want to be registered. To be registered you must complete a university degree.

Surveyors' careers can take them to many parts of the world, sometimes to places rarely visited by other people. Surveyors can choose to be based in the city or the bush and can be involved in various types of projects involving various other types of professions and disciplines such as engineering, town planning, environment science, finance and the law.

Surveyors measure, analyse and report land-related information for the planning and regulation of land, sea and the environment. Surveyors may work in related fields such as photogrammetry, geographic information systems (GIS) or remote sensing, and as project managers. After spending some years in the field, they often progress to management roles.

ANZSCO description: 232212: Plans, directs and conducts survey work to determine, delineate, plan and precisely position tracts of land, natural and constructed features, coastlines, marine floors and underground works, and manages related information systems. Registration or licensing may be required.

Alternative names: Geomatic Engineer, Geomatician

Specialisations:

Cadastral/Land Surveyor
A cadastral/land surveyor marks property boundaries and records the information on plans and maps. They must be licensed to do this work, since the plans they make provide the basis for legal transactions of land parcels.
Land Surveyor
(Source: Seek)
Engineering Surveyor
An engineering surveyor surveys routes for railways, roads, pipelines, canals, sewers and tunnels and makes detailed surveys of construction sites, dam sites, multistorey buildings and other engineering projects.

Engineering Surveying is the broad term used to describe the work of surveyors on civil engineering jobs. The role of an engineering surveyor is a lot larger than simply set out for construction of a structure and survey pick-ups. Engineering Surveyors will usually be the professionals who first examine a finished design for a project and often will identify any design or practicality issues.

The Engineering Surveyor [ES] receives the plans for the job and after review, will begin to draw them on a CAD based computer programme. During the drawing and calculation stage, the ES will be able to identify any issues in the design or any they see in terms of the practicalities of building the structure. If any issues are found, the ES will liaise with the engineering team and help in a preparation of a technical query.

Once the design is plotted and calculations are completed, the work on site will begin. The ESs will first establish a network of control points around the site in a position predetermined with engineers and supervisors on site. The control points need to be in useful, safe and accessible areas but also in areas where they will not be disturbed. When the work commences, the ESs always communicate with the site supervisor and discuss which is the best and safest way to proceed with the setting out or survey task at hand.

Once all the survey data has been recorded, the Engineering Surveyor will return to the office to process the data, complete calculations and finally complete the as-built documentation. The as-built documentation may be presented on a drawing, spreadsheet or a combination of both.
(Source: Land Surveyors Perth)


Engineering Surveyor
(Source: Land Surveyors Perth)
Remote Sensing Surveyor
A remote sensing surveyor uses digital data from high-resolution satellites and airborne imagery systems to monitor changes in the surface features of the Earth.

Remote sensing plays a prominent and key role in the mapping and management of the Australian continent. Frequently it has been the only practical means to achieve the speed and detail necessary to explore and develop a rugged land covering more than 7 million km, with territorial waters of about the same area, and serve the needs of widely dispersed urban and rural communities.

Remote Sensing Map
Landsat 8 Operational Land Imager (OLI) true-colour image captured 27 April 2017 that
highlights areas of mangroves that changed to the oceanic information class (shown in red)
at Rocky Dam Creek/Cape Palmerston National Park.

(Source: MDPI)
Remote Sensing Surveyor
(Source: RMIT)
Topographic Surveyor
A topographic surveyor provides information for the compilation of maps of physical features of the earth's surface, such as hills, valleys, rivers and lakes, by making field measurements and taking aerial photographs. They work on, above or below the surface of the land or sea, and often work with other professionals.
Topographic Surveyor
(Source: Pinterest)
Geodetic Surveyor
A geodetic surveyor uses signals from satellites such as the global positioning system (GPS), star observations, precise levelling and electronic distance measurements to locate positions accurately on the earth's surface for global mapping, and to monitor movements of the earth's crust.

GPS Receiver
GPS Receiver
(Source: ICSM)
Geodetic
(Source: ICSM)
Photogrammetric Surveyor or Photogrammetrist

A photogrammetrist specializes in using satellite images, aerial photographs, light imaging detection, and ranging technology to build models of the Earth’s surface and it’s features in order to create maps. They compile and analyze spatial data like distance and elevation.

Photogrammetrists provide satellite and aerial surveys of locations to create base maps that provides geographic information systems (GIS) data to be layered on top. He or she may also use (LIDAR) technology. These systems use lasers attached to cars or planes to digitally map the topography of the earth and even the location and density of forest canopies.
Photogrammetric Surveyor results
(Source: ASPRS)
Mine Surveyor (below)  

 

Knowledge, skills and attributes

Surveyors need:

  • good mathematics skills
  • Interested in technology
  • Good organisational skills and attention to detail
  • the ability to work neatly and accurately
  • the ability to work independently or as part of a team
  • good health and eyesight (which can be corrected) - normal colour vision
  • a good eye for detail
  • Strong communication skills


Duties and Tasks

Surveyors may perform the following tasks:Surveyor

  • work out the size and shape of an area of land
  • work out the position of boundaries of public or private land
  • compile and evaluate data and interpret codes of practice
  • study the natural and social environment, measure land and marine resources and use the data in planning development in urban, rural and regional areas
  • plan, develop and redevelop urban or rural property, land and buildings
  • plan, measure and manage construction works
  • produce plans, maps, files, charts and reports.

 

Working ConditionsOn construction site

Surveyors may work in related fields such as photogrammetry, geographic information systems or remote sensing, and as project managers or financial advisers. After spending some years in the field, they often become managers.

Surveyors may spend a lot of time working outdoors. They also work in offices, analysing data and preparing plans and reports.

Surveyors can work on, above or below the surface of the land or sea, and often work with other professionals. They often work in multidisciplinary teams, and often outdoors, travelling extensively throughout Australia and overseas. In Australia, surveyors are often employed in fly in-fly out (FIFO) positions, basing themselves in cities and flying to a mine site.

The role is usually a full-time position, Monday to Friday, however this might vary when working on site.

Tools and technologies

Surveyors use a range of sophisticated surveying equipment and software, including Global Positioning Systems (GPS), Geographic Information Systems (GIS), Computer Assisted Drafting (CAD), theodolites (for measuring horizontal and vertical angles) and land levels.

Engineering Surveyors will use a wide range of instruments to assist them with their on-site work. The most common of these will be the Total Station, GPS and Dumpy Level or Digital Level.

  
Education and training/entrance requirements

To become a surveyor you usually need to complete a degree in surveying or a related area.

Surveyor

Farmer

Horticultural Assistant

Zookeeper

Beekeeper

Civil Engineer

Horticulturalist

Viticulturalist

Horticulturalist

Beekeeper

Landscape Architect

Lifeguard

Horse Trainer

Forester

Electrical Linesperson

Shearer

Greenkeeper

Stonemason

Crop Farmer

Livestock Farmer

Aquaculture Farmer

Miner

Mining Engineer

Petroleum Engineer

Jillaroo Jackeroo

Arborist

Horse Manager

Wool Classer

Farrier

Waste Water Operator

Horse Groomer

Grain Oilseed Pasture Grower

Animal Attendant and Trainer

Coastal Engineer

Pomologist

Pest and Weed Controller

Geographer

Olericulturist

Environmental Consultant

Floriculturist

Farmer

Horticultural Assistant

Zookeeper

Civil Engineer

Viticulturalist

Horticulturalist

Surveyor

Beekeeper

Landscape Architect

Lifeguard

Horse Trainer

Forester

Electrical Linesperson

Shearer

Greenkeeper

Stonemason

Crop Farmer

Livestock Farmer

Aquaculture Farmer

Miner

Mining Engineer

Petroleum Engineer

Jillaroo Jackeroo

Arborist

Horse Manager

Wool Classer

Farrier

Waste Water Operator

Horse Groomer

Grain Oilseed Pasture Grower

Animal Attendant and Trainer

Coastal Engineer

Pomologist

Pest and Weed Controller

Geographer

Olericulturist

Environmental Consultant

Floriculturist

Farmer

Horticultural Assistant

Zookeeper

Civil Engineer

Viticulturalist

Horticulturalist

Surveyor

Beekeeper

Landscape Architect

Lifeguard

Horse Trainer

Forester

Electrical Linesperson

Shearer

Greenkeeper

Stonemason

Crop Farmer

Livestock Farmer

Aquaculture Farmer

Miner

Mining Engineer

Petroleum Engineer

Jillaroo Jackeroo

Arborist

Horse Manager

Wool Classer

Farrier

Waste Water Operator

Horse Groomer

Grain Oilseed Pasture Grower

Animal Attendant and Trainer

Coastal Engineer

Pomologist

Pest and Weed Controller

Geographer

Olericulturist

Environmental Consultant

Floriculturist