Veterinary Surgeon

Community and Health

Equine Veterinarian
Veterinary Nurse

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Helping or advisingClerical or OrganisingAnalytic or ScientificSkill Level 5

Veterinarians diagnose and treat sickness, disease and injury in all types of animals. They advise on measures to prevent the occurrence or spread of diseases, and on ways to improve the health Future Growth Very Strong and productivity of animals. They also supervise safety standards for animal food supplies.

Veterinarians diagnose and treat sick and injured animals, including pets, farm animals, native wildlife, sporting animals and more exotic animals, such as those kept in zoos or aquariums. They examine tissue, blood, urine and other samples to assist in diagnosing the cause of disease and decide on the appropriate treatment. Treatments may include prescribing drugs, surgical procedures and nursing care. In some cases they may also have to humanely kill an animal to end pain and suffering, or to prevent the spread of disease. Veterinarians also educate animal owners and breeders on techniques to maintain or improve an animal's health and/or welfare.


ANZSCO description: Diagnoses, treats and prevents animal diseases, ailments and injuries. Registration or licensing is required.

Alternative names: Vet, Veterinary Surgeon

Specialisations: Veterinary Parasitologist, Veterinary Pathologist

Knowledge, skills and attributes Dog Examined

Veterinarians need:

  • interested in the health and welfare of animals
  • observant
  • good analysing and problem-solving skills
  • good communication skills
  • aptitude for science
  • an enquiring mind
  • organisational and supervisory skills.


Duties & Tasks

Veterinarians may perform the following tasks:

  • examine sick and injured animals and perform diagnostic tests
  • examine tissues and samples from sick animals to identify the cause of disease
  • treat animals by using drugs, surgical procedures and nursing care
  • vaccinate animals to prevent disease
  • certify viability of animals for breeding and performance
  • give advice to owners and breeders on animal health and care
  • humanely kill animals to end pain and suffering or to prevent the spread of disease
  • advise on feeding and breeding strategies to achieve maximum production
  • notify authorities of outbreaks of animal diseases and certify animals for exportation
  • attend horse and greyhound tracks, sporting events and dog and cat shows to monitor and/or advise on the condition of the animals
  • assist in public education programs in the promotion and maintenance of the welfare of animals.

Working conditions

The majority of veterinarians work in small animal practices, treating dogs, cats and other pets. Other veterinarians may work in rural areas, travelling to farms to treat sick livestock. Regardless of whether they work in a small private practice in the suburbs, or are driving between dairy farms, veterinarians work long hours, and may have to remain on call in case of emergencies. When working with animals that are distressed or in pain, veterinarians must take special care to avoid being bitten, kicked or scratched. It's not just the animal that may be distressed, with veterinarians often having to soothe with emotional or demanding pet owners. Veterinarians may work either indoors or outdoors depending on the location of their employment.

Veterinarians usually work long and irregular hours, especially those in private practice who may be called upon to treat sick animals at any hour of the day or night.

Tools and technologies

Veterinarians use a range of medical equipment, similar to that used by doctors treating humans, including stethoscopes and surgical instruments. They also use similar equipment for diagnosis, such as x-rays, ultrasounds and other radiographic machines.

Education and training/entrance requirements

To become a veterinarian you need to complete an accredited degree in veterinary science.

Some Australian Universities offers a five year veterinary science degree, consisting of the three year Bachelor of Science (Veterinary Biology) combined with the two year Doctor of Veterinary Medicine.

 

Did You Know?

While the vast majority of veterinary science graduates work as vets in private practice, there is a range of alternative career destinations available.

A number of graduates each year find employment in government services (in livestock disease control, diagnostic service work, disease research, animal export/import, quarantine for example), in research, higher education, industry, or in wildlife conservation departments or zoos.

Opportunities for veterinary science graduates are also beginning to emerge in additional areas such as genetic technologies, food safety, animal welfare and urban animal management.


Vets in Movies.......

Dr. Dolittle(1998): Trailer: YouTube: https://youtu.be/-0zVwz2jIf8


Or in TV servies

Bondi Vet

Bondi Vet


Vet on the Hill

Vet on Hill


 

Equine Veterinarian
Community and Health

Helping or advisingClerical or OrganisingAnalytic or ScientificSkill Level 5

Equine veterinarians are large animal practitioners that specialize in health management of horses. Future Growth Very Strong


Duties and Tasks

Equine veterinarians are licensed animal health professionals who are qualified to diagnose and treat horses involved in competition and production. An equine vet can work many environments, but they generally work closely with both equine patients and their human owners.

The typical routine for an equine vet includes performing basic exams, giving routine vaccinations, drawing blood, prescribing medications, evaluating and suturing wounds, performing surgeries, and giving post-surgical exams.


Other duties may include performing pre-purchase exams, monitoring the reproductive health of breeding stallions and broodmares, assisting with foalings, and taking x-rays or ultrasounds.

Equine veterinarians may work in conjunction with a farrier to correct angular limb deformities, solve lameness issues, and ensure that the foot is properly balanced.

It is common for equine veterinarians to work a five to six day week with additional “on call” emergency hours as needed. Work may occur outdoors in varying temperatures and weather conditions. Veterinarians, especially those working with large animals, should always follow proper safety precautions to minimize the risk of injury while working with their patients.
(Source: The Balance)



Vet
Tony Koenig examining horse

 

 

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Vet

Firefighter

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Local Government Inspector

Paramedic

Postal Worker

Police

Teacher

Dentist

physio

Optometrist

Chaplain

Nurse

Early Childhood Educator

Social Worker

Real Estate Agent

Special Care Worker

Parliamentarian

Public Servant

Chiropractor

Medical Practitioner

Ophthalmologist

Audiologist

Podiatrist

Medical Imaging Technologist