School Teacher

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Teacher of English to Speakers of other Languages [ESL]
Teacher of the Hearing Impaired
Teacher of the Sight Impaired
Vocational Education and Training [VET] Lecturer
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Related Jobs or Working with these Jobs

 

Overview: School Teacher

School teachers create and teach lessons on a many different topics to help students develop and improve.

School teachers teach their students in a number of different ways, including formal lessons, discussions, hands-on activities, experiments, projects, assignments, excursions and games.

School teachers undertake specific training to teach in secondary schools, primary schools, or early childhood settings.

 

Education Aide
Community and Health
Clerical or OrganisingHelping or advisingSkill Level 2Skill Level 3

Education Aides perform non-teaching duties to assist teaching staff in schools, provide care and supervision for children in preschools, and provide assistance to Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander and Maori students and their teachers. Future Growth Very Strong

Teacher's aides assist teaching staff in schools by performing non-teaching duties such as care and supervision for children. They assist and participate in learning activities, prepare learning areas and activities, and provide individual assistance to students, particularly those with learning, physical or behavioural difficulties.

Teacher's aides are needed throughout Australia, from the large schools in our cities and towns to the small remote schools in isolated country areas.


ANZSCO description: Assists teaching staff in preparing teaching materials and with general classroom tasks.

Alternative names: Education Aide, Teacher's Assistant, Education Support Worker

Specialisations: Aboriginal/Torres Strait Islander Education Worker, School Services Officer, Special Needs Teacher's Assistant, Student Liaison Officer, Teachers' Assistant

Aide working
(Source: Education Aotearoa)

Knowledge, skills and attributes

A teachers aide needs:

  • an interest in education and a love of learning
  • flexibility and adaptability
  • organisational skills
  • good communication skills
  • the ability to relate to children
  • the ability to accept direction and supervision

Duties and Tasks

  • demonstrating, supervising and participating in activities which enhance the physical, social, emotional and intellectual development of children in schools and preschool centres
  • preparing indoor and outdoor areas for learning and recreational activities
  • assisting children with intellectual, physical and behavioural difficulties with their academic studies
  • assisting children individually to learn social skills
  • assisting with preparing teaching aids, and copying and collating written and printed material
  • distributing and collecting lesson material
  • providing assistance to small groups of Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander and Maori students
  • providing home-school liaison and counselling for Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander and Maori students and their families

Working conditions

Teachers aides work mostly indoors in classrooms, libraries and other buildings in public and private schools, although they may also accompany school classes on field trips or outdoor activities. They often work part-time, but may also be employed on an ongoing basis, and they work within school hours, between 8am and 4pm. During their work they meet and connect with children, parents, teachers and other members of school staff. Teacher's aide work is more prevalent in pre-primary and primary education, however opportunities may also be available in secondary education for students with special needs.

Tools and technologies

Teachers' aides are often required to make copies of education resources, and may need to be familiar with photocopying equipment. They may also need to be familiar with word processing and other computer programs.

Education and training/entrance requirements

To become a teachers’ aide, you usually need to complete a formal qualification in education support.

The Certificate III and Certificate IV in Education Support are available from TAFE Colleges and other registered training organisations throughout Australia.

You can also complete a traineeship. The education assistant, Indigenous language and culture teaching assistant, education officer, and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander education officer traineeships usually take 12 months to complete.

To work in schools in Australia, you need to hold a current Working With Children Check issued by the Department of Community Services, and undergo a National Police History Check conducted by the Department of Education Screening Unit. Contact the Department of Education for more information.

 


Early Childhood Teacher
Community and Health


Helping or advising
Artistic or CreativeSkill Level 5

Early childhood teachers plan and conduct education programmes for young children. Future Growth Very Strong

Knowledge, skills and attributes

  • able to relate to children and their families

  • a keen desire to teach children

  • willing to learn

  • good problem-solving skills

  • sound literacy and numeracy skills

  • high-level planning and organisational skills

  • enthusiastic, tactful, patient and a sense of humour

  • prepared to work outside of school hours.

Duties and Tasks

Early childhood teachers may perform the following tasks:

  • plan activities using a variety of materials and equipment to develop good coordination, social skills, creativity, self-expression and an interest in learning

  • promote language development and self-confidence through storytelling, drama, music and discussions

  • help to organise and participate in excursions to enhance learning experiences

  • encourage children to question and explore the world in which they live

  • observe children to evaluate and record their progress and to detect signs of developmental disorders, ill health or emotional disturbance

  • recommend appropriate programmes for further development

  • work with guidance officers, speech pathologists and psychologists to assist children with special needs

  • help integrate children with special needs into mainstream classes

  • promote health and safety concepts and social interaction with other children Teacher with Preschool child

  • promote awareness and appreciation of diversity in multicultural societies

  • attend to sick children and those in need of first aid

  • comfort children who are hurt or distressed

  • assist children with their toileting and personal hygiene

  • discuss aspects of children's development with parents and other educators

  • discuss the aims of the education programme with parents

  • participate in community activities and parent/staff committees

  • supervise and work with student teachers and trainee childcare workers.

Working conditions

Early childhood teachers work in government-owned pre-school centres, early education classes, community kindergartens and community childcare centres.



Primary School Teacher
Community and Health

Clerical or OrganisingHelping or advisingArtistic or CreativeSkill Level 5

Primary school teachers educate children between the ages of five and twelve in Australia. Primary school teachers educate primary school children by planning and conducting an education programme Future Growth Strong to develop literacy and numeracy, as well as the physical, emotional, intellectual and social growth of their students and other academic skills. They prepare daily lesson plans that fit within wider curriculum requirements, and teach a wide range of subject areas including mathematics, English, science and technology, society and environment, health, creative arts and physical education. Primary school teachers are needed all over the state - from our busy urban areas to rural and regional centres and towns to remote communities in isolated areas.

ANZSCO description: Teaches and coordinates a range of subjects within a prescribed curriculum to primary school students. Registration or licensing is required. Teacher with Primary students

Specialisations:
Primary school teachers are usually trained to teach the whole curriculum. Some undertake further studies to become specialist primary teachers who develop and teach programmes for students with special needs, rural and isolated children or children for whom English is a second language. In some schools, primary school teachers teach languages other than English if they have the appropriate qualifications, skills and experience.

Aboriginal Education Teacher (Primary)
An Aboriginal education teacher (primary) teaches specially designed programmes to Indigenous primary school students.

Teacher Librarian - Primary
A teacher librarian - primary manages the school's learning resources in addition to undertaking the duties of a teacher. Teacher librarians play a key role in teaching cross-curricular skills in information literacy and provide professional development for other teachers. They help students to seek, critically evaluate, synthesise and present information using a range of resources and information technologies. They expose students to a variety of genres (writing styles) in print and digital formats, and promote the best quality literature and authors to reflect different cultures and themes. Teacher librarians ensure the library resource centre is multi-functional and a focal point for student learning.

Knowledge, skills and attributes

A primary school teacher needs:

  • to enjoy working with children
  • a friendly and personable demeanor
  • patience and tolerance in dealing with students of differing abilities
  • organisational skills and creativity
  • able to communicate simply and clearly
  • leadership and motivational skills
  • a supportive and caring nature
  • prepared to work outside of school hours.



Duties and Tasks

Primary school teachers may perform the following tasks:

  • prepare daily and longer-term lesson plans in accordance with curriculum guidelines
  • teach a full range of learning areas, including English (reading, writing, speaking and listening), mathematics, science, technology, society and environment, creative arts, personal development, health and physical education
  • develop children's interests, abilities and coordination using creative activities such as art, music and sport
  • use computers to assist with lesson preparation, teaching and reporting
  • develop and maintain good working habits and discipline in classrooms
  • carry out administrative duties
  • supervise students during classes and at other times in the school day, including in the playground during breaks
  • attend staff meetings and other training and development sessions
  • take part in joint decision-making about educational issues
  • assess and evaluate students' progress in written and oral work
  • discuss students' progress and concerns with parents and administrators
  • assist with and organise sporting activities, school concerts and excursions
  • prepare for and attend parent-teacher interviews and other functions.

Working conditions

Primary school teachers work in classrooms in primary schools, but may also undertake their duties in school libraries, administrative areas, outside in the playground or sports areas, and outside of school during excursions, field trips, sporting events or camps. Working conditions may be noisy or stressful. They usually work regular teaching hours, but are expected to work longer hours to plan and prepare lessons, mark work, and attend staff meetings or school events like fetes or graduation ceremonies.

Primary school teachers need to continually update their subject knowledge and teaching methods through private study and professional development activities. With further training and experience, they may be promoted to a position of educational leadership, such as primary school principal.

Tools and technologies

Primary school teachers use a range of educational resources such as white boards, workbooks and textbooks, audio-visual texts and equipment and a range of other teaching aids. They also use computers and other office equipment, and may also, depending on their role, use art and craft materials, musical instruments or sporting equipment.


Education and training/entrance requirements

To become a primary school teacher you usually need to complete an education degree majoring in primary education. Alternatively, you can study a degree in any area followed by the completion of a postgraduate qualification specialising in primary education.

 

Secondary School Teacher
Community and Health

Clerical or OrganisingNature or RecreationHelping or advisingArtistic or CreativeAnalytic or ScientificSkill Level 5

Secondary school teachers teach one or a number of subject areas to students in Years 7 to 12.  Subject areas include English, mathematics, science, history, geography, drama, dance, art, music, Future Growth Strong health and physical education, design, information technology, languages other than English, and home economics.

ANZSCO description: Teaches one or more subjects within a prescribed curriculum to secondary school students and promotes students' social, emotional, intellectual and physical development. Registration or licensing is required.

Knowledge, skills and attributes

A secondary school teacher needs:

  • enthusiasm for, and ability in, their chosen subject area and teaching high-level
  • to enjoy working with young people
  • able to communicate concepts and instructions clearly
  • a friendly and personable demeanor
  • patience and tolerance when dealing with students of differing abilities and cultures
  • organisational skills
  • acceptance of the rights and needs of all individuals
  • prepared to work outside of school hours
  • leadership and motivational skills
  • a supportive and caring nature

Duties and Tasks

Secondary school teachers may perform the following tasks:
Secondary Teacher

  • prepare daily lessons and long-term teaching programmes in accordance with state or territory curriculum and guidelines
  • teach using a variety of methods, including formal lessons, discussions, practical activities, experiments, projects, assignments and excursions, taking into account the differences between individual students
  • use information technology to assist with lesson preparation, teaching and reporting
  • set tests, exams, projects, assignments and homework; mark and correct assessments; and sort the results
  • evaluate and report on the progress of students, and discuss individual performance and problems with students and parents
  • establish and maintain good working habits and discipline in classrooms and throughout the school
  • supervise extra classes when other teachers are absent
  • supervise students in the yard during lunchtime and other breaks
  • carry out relevant administrative duties
  • attend staff meetings, educational conferences and other professional development activities
  • coordinate work experience and industry-based programmes
  • participate in other activities in partnership with parents and the school community, including parent-teacher nights, school council and other committees
  • assist with organising sporting events, camping trips and other excursions
  • be involved in distance education (for example, teaching using radio and television transmission, correspondence, audiovisual and other multimedia resources)
  • coordinate administrative support programmes and the work of non-teaching staff in schools
  • network with other teachers
  • work with other staff to revise the school's policies and curriculum implementation to reflect changing student needs and government initiatives.

Specialisations:

Aboriginal Education Teacher (Secondary)
An Aboriginal education teacher (secondary) teaches specially designed programmes to Indigenous secondary school students.

English Teacher - Secondary
An english teacher - secondary teaches students communication, writing and critical thinking skills in response to a wide array of literature and media. They guide students in understanding the different concepts and themes that are present in literary and media-based material and inform them of their historical context.

Mathematics Teacher - Secondary
A mathematics teacher - secondary teaches the fundamentals of mathematics in areas such as geometry, calculus, algebra and statistics. They help students to develop analytical skills through the application of mathematics in everyday life.

Science Teacher - Secondary
A science teacher - secondary teaches students the scientific principles of the world around them. They may also specialise in areas such as biology, human biology, chemistry, physics and environmental science.

Teacher Librarian - Secondary
A teacher librarian - secondary manages the school's learning resources in addition to undertaking the duties of a teacher. Teacher librarians play a key role in teaching cross-curricular skills in information literacy and provide professional development for other teachers. They help students to seek, critically evaluate, synthesise and present information using a range of resources and information technologies. They expose students to a variety of genres (writing styles) in print and digital formats and promote the best quality literature and authors to reflect different cultures and themes. Teacher librarians ensure the library resource centre is multi-functional and a focal point for student learning.

Did You Know?

The Australian Curriculum .....


Australian Curriculum


The Australian Curriculum describes what young Australians should learn as they progress through schooling. It is the foundation for their future learning, growth and active participation in the Australian community. It sets out essential knowledge, understanding, skills and capabilities and provides a national standard for student achievement in core learning areas.

The council of federal, state and territory education ministers is responsible for endorsing the Australian Curriculum. State and territory education authorities are responsible for implementation of the Australian Curriculum and for supporting schools and teachers.
(Source: Australian Curriculum)



Working conditions

Secondary school teachers work in high schools and senior campuses. They usually work regular teaching hours, but are expected to work additional hours to prepare for classes, attend staff meetings and undertake administrative tasks such as marking and writing reports. They may also be required to work additional hours to take students on excursions or camps, or to attend assemblies, graduations or other school functions. Secondary school teachers are also expected to attend professional development seminars and sessions.Secondary school teachers need to continually update their subject knowledge and teaching methods through private study and professional development activities.

Tools and technologies

Secondary school teachers use a range of educational teachnologies and tools to develop and deliver learning, such as white boards, workbooks and textbooks, audio-visual texts and equipment, and a range of other teaching aids. They also use computers and other office equipment, and may also, depending on their role, use materials or equipment that is relevant to the subject area in which they teach, such as art and craft supplies, sports equipment, film and video or photographic equipment, or other teaching aids relevant to their specialisation.


Education and training/entrance requirements

To become a secondary school teacher you usually need to complete a degree in secondary education.

Alternatively, you can undertake a postgraduate qualification in secondary education after completing a degree in a relevant study area.

Art Teacher
Community and Health

Clerical or OrganisingArtistic or CreativeSkill Level 5

Art teachers working in schools teach students painting, drawing, printmaking, photography, sculpture and ceramics. Art teachers teaching in secondary school teach the practical skills and theory of various art forms, and may also teach the history of these art forms. Depending on the school's facilities, art teachers may set-up and operate kilns, photographic darkrooms or other specialist art studios and/or equipment. When planning lessons and projects they must ensure that there are sufficient art supplies and tools for all students. Some art teachers may arrange exhibitions of student art work within a school and the local community. They may also work privately or at art centres.

Working conditions

Most art teachers work in private and public schools throughout Western Australia - teaching students from Year 1 through to Year 12. While they work regular school hours, they are also expected to work additional hours to prepare for lessons, attend staff meetings and carry out administrative tasks, such as marking and report writing. Teachers in any discipline (including art) are also expected to attend regular professional development courses.

Tools and technologies

Art teachers work with a range of media and materials, which may include pencils, paints, palette knives, dyes, paper, canvases, clay and textiles. Some art teachers may also use textbooks, whiteboards and other standard classroom equipment, especially when teaching art theory and history. They may also use computers, especially when they are teaching digital art forms, and when writing student performance reports.

Education and training/entrance requirements

To become an art teacher, you usually need to study a degree in education majoring in visual arts education.

Alternatively you can study a degree in visual arts or fine art, followed by a postgraduate degree in education.

Art Teacher - Private Tuition
Community and Health

Clerical or OrganisingArtistic or CreativeSkill Level 4Skill Level 5

 

Art Teachers (Private Tuition) teach art in private training establishments.

Duties and Tasks

  • Plans programmes of study for individual students and groups.

  • Prepares and presents material on the theory of the subject area.

  • Instructs and demonstrates practical aspects of the subject area.

  • Assigns problems and exercises relative to students' training needs and talents.

  • Assesses students and offers advice, criticism and encouragement.

  • Revises curricula, course content, course materials and methods of instruction.

  • Prepares students for examinations, performances and assessments.

  • Keep abreast of developments in the subject area by attending professional conferences, seminars and courses, reading current literature, and talking with colleagues.

  • May arrange visits and tours to professional exhibitions and performances.

  • May organise exhibitions or performances of students' work.



Education and training/entrance requirements

You need a high level of artistic ability to work as an Art Teacher (Private Tuition). Formal qualifications might be useful but aren't essential. VET (Vocational Education and Training) and university are both common study pathways for Art Teachers (Private Tuition).

Music Teacher
Community and Health

Clerical or OrganisingArtistic or CreativeSkill Level 3Skill Level 4Skill Level 5

Music teachers help students to develop their theoretical music skills, as well as instructing them in singing or playing musical instruments. They plan lessons based around the skill level of their students Future Growth Strong and teach them how to read, play or sing music. They also introduce their students to different styles of music, teach them the different practical applications of music theory, and discuss key concepts of music history, musical form and musical analysis with their students. Music teachers may also prepare students for musical exams or assessments, record their progress, mark their students' work, and organise rehearsals and performances for schools bands and choirs. Music teachers work right round the state in our cities and towns.


ANZSCO description: Teaches students in the practice, theory and performance of music in private training establishments.

Alternative names: Music Teacher

Specialisations: Instrumental Teacher, Private Music Tutor, School Music Teacher, Singing Teacher (Private Tuition)

Music tutor
(Source: Australian Music Teachers)

Knowledge, skills and attributes

A music teacher needs:

  • a love of and passion for music
  • musical abillity
  • a helpful and instructive manner
  • patience and an encouraging nature
  • organisational skills
  • communication skills

Duties and Tasks

  • planning programs of study for individual students and groups
  • preparing and presenting material on the theory of the subject area
  • instructing and demonstrating practical aspects of the subject area
  • assigning problems and exercises relative to students' training needs and talents
  • assessing students and offering advice, criticism and encouragement
  • revising curricula, course content, course materials and methods of instruction
  • preparing students for examinations, performance and assessments
  • keeping abreast of developments in the subject area by attending professional conferences, seminars and courses, reading current literature, and talking with colleagues
  • may arrange visits and tours to professional exhibitions and performances
  • may organise for exhibitions or performances of students' work


Working conditions

Music teachers either work as classroom teachers who usually lead classes of students in weekly music lessons and group music activities, or as one-on-one tutors who teach students how to play one specific instrument. They may work in school classrooms and offices, from home, at their student's home, at a studio space or music school, or in rented public spaces such as a community hall or recreation centre.

Classroom-based music teachers work regular school hours as well as longer hours to attend meetings, mark work and take care of administrative duties, whilst independent music teachers work irregular hours at times that are convenient for their students. They generally require quiet spaces to teach, and may need to organise for instruments such as pianos or drum kits to be available. They may need to travel to get to their lessons.

Tools and technologies

Music teachers use a range of musical instruments, as well as music reference books, sheet music, music stands and other musical equipment. They may use music recording equipment and audio-visual devices as teaching aids, and may also use computers and specialist musical software to teach the theoretical or practical aspects of music.

Education and training/entrance requirements

You can work as a private music teacher without any formal qualifications. However, you are more likely to improve your employment prospects if you have formal qualifications in music, or have a high level of musical ability and experience in teaching music.

VET courses in music are offered at TAFE colleges, and other registered training organisations throughout Australia.

You can also complete a degree majoring in music or music studies.

Most courses require an audition and you may be required to demonstrate a high level of musical proficiency.

To work with children in Australia, you must obtain a Working with Children Check.

Special Education Teacher
Community and Health

Clerical or OrganisingHelping or advisingAnalytic or ScientificSkill Level 5

Special needs teachers educate primary and secondary school students who have special learning needs such as learning difficulties, an impairment in their intellectual abilities, or students who need extra support to reach their full potential. Future Growth Strong

Special needs teachers assess students' abilities and limitations and aid students in the development of their literacy, numeracy and other academic skills, as well as fostering independence and life skills. They may also meet with parents and other teachers to discuss a student's progress.


ANZSCO description: Teaches academic and living skills to primary, middle or intermediate, and secondary school students with particular learning difficulties using various techniques, and promotes students' social, emotional, intellectual and physical development. Registration or licensing is required.

Alternative names: Special needs teacher

Special Needs Teacher
(Source: NSW Department of Education)

Knowledge, skills and attributes

​A special needs teacher needs:

  • to enjoy working with young people with special needs
  • patience and understanding
  • a supportive and caring nature
  • excellent interpersonal and communication skills
  • the ability to motivate and guide others
  • to be able to work as part of team.

Duties and Tasks

  • assessing students' abilities and limitations with regard to intellectual, physical, social and emotional disabilities, exceptional intellectual gifts, or specific problems of language and culture
  • planning, organising and implementing special programs to provide remedial or advanced tuition
  • administering various forms of assessment and interpreting the results
  • teaching basic academic subjects, and practical and self-help skills to hearing and sight impaired students
  • devising instructional materials, methods and aids to assist in training and rehabilitation
  • advising, instructing and counselling parents and teachers on the availability and use of special techniques
  • stimulating and developing interests, abilities, manual skills and coordination
  • conferring with other staff members to plan and schedule lessons for special needs students
  • preparing and maintaining student data and other records and submitting reports

Working conditions

​Special needs teachers mainly work in the education sector, in special education units teaching individuals or groups with special needs. They create educational plans for each student to address individual needs and enhance learning. They may also help integrate students into regular classrooms.

Special needs teachers usually work regular school hours, but may be required to work additional hours to prepare for classes and to attend staff meetings.


Tools and technologies

​Special needs teachers may use a variety of assistive technology to educate students with special needs. They may use communication boards, computers with text-to-speech or voice operated software, talking calculators or tablet computers. They may also use standard teaching materials, such as whiteboards, textbooks and workbooks.

Education and training/entrance requirements

​To become a special needs teacher, you usually need to complete a degree in primary or secondary education, specialising in special needs teaching.

Alternatively, you can complete a degree in a relevant study area, followed by a postgraduate qualification in education. You may also need to undertake further postgraduate study in special needs education to specialise in teaching special needs students.

To work as a special needs teacher in Australia, you must be registered. You also need to hold a current Working With Children Check and undergo a National Police History Check conducted by the Department of Education Screening Unit.

Teacher of ESL
Community and Health
Clerical or OrganisingHelping or advisingSkill Level 5

Teachers of English to Speakers of other Languages [ESL] teach classes in English to students whose first language is a language other than English.  Future Growth Decline

Duties and Tasks

  • assessing the extent of language difficulties in students for whom English is a second language
  • teaching students individually and in small groups out of the regular classroom, and assisting students within normal classroom settings
  • teaching students English language skills using a variety of methods including lecture and visual demonstration
  • providing assistance to other classroom teachers by designing special teaching programs for students with English language difficulties
  • designing and producing teaching materials and adapting existing materials
  • preparing course outlines and goals
  • assigning lessons, correcting homework, and preparing and grading exams
  • analysing, recording and reporting progress to regular classroom teachers, parents and students

Teacher

Vet

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Paramedic

Dentist

physio

Optometrist

Chaplain

Nurse

Early Childhood Educator

Midwife

Social Worker

Real Estate Agent

Special Care Worker

Chiropractor

Medical Practitioner

Ophthalmologist

Audiologist

Podiatrist

Medical Imaging Technologist

Speech Pathologist

Occupational Therapist

Natural Therapist

Prosthetist

SES Officer

Art Therapist

Dermatologist

Psychiatrist

Plastic or Reconstructive Surgeon

acupuncturist

Osteopath

Paediatrician

Neurologist

Indigenous Community Worker

Oncologist

Sports Doctor

Retirement Nursing Home Manager

Vet

Firefighter

Garbage Collector

Midwife

Paramedic

Teacher

Dentist

physio

Optometrist

Chaplain

Nurse

Early Childhood Educator

Social Worker

Real Estate Agent

Special Care Worker

Chiropractor

Medical Practitioner

Ophthalmologist

Audiologist

Podiatrist

Medical Imaging Technologist

Speech Pathologist

Occupational Therapist

Natural Therapist

Prosthetist

SES Officer

Art Therapist

Dermatologist

Psychiatrist

Plastic or Reconstructive Surgeon

acupuncturist

Osteopath

Paediatrician

Neurologist

Indigenous Community Worker

Oncologist

Sports Doctor

Retirement Nursing Home Manager

Vet

Firefighter

Garbage Collector

Midwife

Paramedic

Teacher

Dentist

physio

Optometrist

Chaplain

Nurse

Child Care Worker

Social Worker

Real Estate Agent

Special Care Worker

Chiropractor

Medical Practitioner

Ophthalmologist

Audiologist

Podiatrist

Medical Imaging Technologist

Speech Pathologist

Occupational Therapist

Natural Therapist

Prosthetist

SES Officer

Art Therapist

Dermatologist

Psychiatrist

Plastic or Reconstructive Surgeon

acupuncturist

Osteopath

Paediatrician

Neurologist

Indigenous Community Worker

Oncologist

Sports Doctor

Retirement Nursing Home Manager

Vet

Firefighter

Garbage Collector

Midwife

Paramedic

Teacher

Dentist

physio

Optometrist

Chaplain

Nurse

Child Care Worker

Social Worker

Real Estate Agent

Special Care Worker

Chiropractor

Medical Practitioner

Ophthalmologist

Audiologist

Podiatrist

Medical Imaging Technologist

Speech Pathologist

Occupational Therapist

Natural Therapist

Prosthetist

SES Officer

Art Therapist

Dermatologist

Psychiatrist

Plastic or Reconstructive Surgeon

acupuncturist

Osteopath

Paediatrician

Neurologist

Indigenous Community Worker

Oncologist

Sports Doctor

Retirement Nursing Home Manager

Vet

Firefighter

Garbage Collector

Midwife

Paramedic

Teacher

Dentist

physio

Optometrist

Chaplain

Nurse

Child Care Worker

Social Worker

Real Estate Agent

Special Care Worker

Medical Practitioner

Ophthalmologist

Audiologist

Podiatrist

Medical Imaging Technologist

  Speech Pathologist