Indigenous Community Worker

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Indigenous Community Liaison Officer

 

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Clerical or OrganisingHelping or advisingSkill Level 2Skill Level 3Skill Level 4
Skill Level 5

A community worker facilitates community development initiatives and collective solutions within a community. They do this by encouraging and assisting community groups to identify their needs, participate in decision-making and develop appropriate services and facilities. Future Growth Very Strong

They frequently act as a source of information and advice to individuals and communities about the services and programs available to them. These workers plan, develop and deliver a range of programs and services, including family support, resettlement programs for migrants and refugees, community and adult education, counselling services and programs for children.


ANZSCO description:
Facilitates community development initiatives and collective solutions within a community to address issues, needs and problems associated with recreational, health, housing, employment and other welfare matters.

Alternative names:
Indigenous Welfare Support Worker


Knowledge, skills and attributes

A community worker needs:

  • a genuine interest in community issues and people
  • good communication skills
  • an ability to resolve conflict quickly
  • to relate to people effectively and patiently
  • to enjoy assisting people
  • an ability to work independently and in collaboration with others.

Duties and Tasks

The primary role of the Indigenous Community Worker is to identify and assist in the development and improvement of the quality of life for Indigenous Australians.

  • To identify the needs and aspirations of the Indigenous Australian community and ensure honest and open relationships with members of this community.
  • To build strong community relations.
  • To develop strategies to increase and enhance the process of reconciliation
  • To provide the opportunity for and cultural development to occur by Indigenous Australian Community for the Indigenous Australian community
  • To ensure access and equity for the Indigenous Australian Citizens
  • To provide community information or education to raise awareness
  • To build and maintain community service system networks
  • To plan, develop and support new and existing community events
  • To advocate on community issues
  • To undertake research and inclusive local needs
  • To undertake strategies to improve access to other services for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people

Working conditions

Attendance at evening meetings, and occasional weekend activities can be expected. Community work also requires extensive travel within local and regional communities and considerable personal contact with members of the community.


Tools and technologies

Community workers may be need to be familiar with word processing and desktop publishing software as they may be required to write reports and submissions for funding. These tools will also be useful when developing programs and promoting them in their communities.

Education and training/entrance requirements

To become a qualified community worker, you usually have to obtain a formal qualification in community services work, social work or social sciences.

The Certificate III and IV in Community Services Work are offered at TAFE Colleges and other registered training organisations throughout Australia.

You can also complete a traineeship in community services work. The traineeships usually take between 12 and 24 months to complete.

You can also become a community worker by studying a degree in social work or social science.

To work with children in Australia, you must obtain a Working with Children Check.



Indigenous Community Liaison Officer
Community and Health

Service or PersuadingClerical or OrganisingHelping or advisingSkill Level 1

Indigenous community liaison officers liaise with Indigenous communities and the state or territory police forces in order to establish and maintain positive relationships.  Future Growth Strong

Alternative names: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community Liaison Officer, Aboriginal Community Constable, Aboriginal Community Liaison Officer, Aboriginal Community Police Officer, Police Aboriginal Liaison Officer, Police Liaison Officer, Community Constable and District Aboriginal Liaison Officer.

Indigenous community liaison officers usually have limited police powers, although in certain circumstances they may assist police officers with law enforcement tasks such as arrest, search and detainment.

In Tasmania and WA, however, there is no separate Indigenous community liaison officer programme. Instead, fully sworn members of the police force perform this function specialising in the liaison role.

ACLO NSW ACLO

Knowledge, skills and attributes

  • Enjoy working with people

  •  Good communication and negotiation skills

  •  Of Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander descent

  •  Of sound character

  •  Acceptable traffic/criminal record

  •  Medically and physically fit

 

Duties & Tasks

  • establish good communication between police and local Indigenous communities

  • help determine disputes involving police and Indigenous communities

  • advise and educate police officers on cross-cultural awareness

  • advise police on potential crime and disorder areas and suggest ways to stop crime and misbehaviour

  • improve community knowledge about policing services and law and order issues

  • provide assistance to relatives visiting Indigenous prisoners

  • assist police and Indigenous persons and their families involved in the juvenile justice process

  • use appropriate police powers and prepare prosecution briefs.

 

Working conditions

Indigenous community liaison officers are required to work shifts, including weekends and public holidays, and may serve in urban and remote communities. Indigenous community liaison officers usually have limited police powers, although in certain circumstances they may assist police officers with law enforcement tasks such as arrest, search and detainment. In Tasmania and WA, however, there is no separate Indigenous community liaison officer programme. Instead, fully sworn members of the police force perform this function specialising in the liaison role.

Education and training/entrance requirements

You can work as an Indigenous community liaison officer in New South Wales, the Northern Territory, South Australia and Queensland without formal qualifications, but employers usually require Year 10. The Aboriginal community liaison officer positions are Indigenous-specific positions. Training is undertaken on the job and further study may be required. Training periods and requirements vary between the states and territories. In Tasmania, Victoria and Western Australia, the role of police Aboriginal community liaison officer is performed by sworn officers of the police force and is not a separate occupation. Contact the recruitment division of your state or territory's police department for further information.

Additional Information

People who have established good networks within Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities are encouraged to apply. Applicants will be required to undergo a National Police Check and hold a drivers licence.

The demand for Aboriginal community liaison officers is dependent on the number of Indigenous people in the state or territory and the existence of police and community-funded initiatives.

Demand for Aboriginal community liaison officers has been increasing since the implementation of the Aboriginal Employment, Training and Career Development Strategy in 1995 by the NSW Police. This strategy aims to increase Aboriginal representation in the police force to two per cent.

In the ACT, the Australian Federal Police employ Indigenous community liaison officers.

 

 

Related Jobs or Working with these Jobs  
(Jobs not linked are currently being worked on)

 

Indigenous Health Worker

Indigenous Health Worker
Police Officer

Police Officer
Prison Officer

Prison Officer
Social Worker

Social Worker
Teacher

Teacher
     

 

Material sourced from  Jobs & Skills WA [Community Worker;]; 
Good Universities Guide [Indigenous Community Liaison Officer;]
CareersOnline [Indigneous Community Liaison Officer];
Ipswich Council; Kempsey Council


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