Fire Fighter

Community and Health

Aviation Firefigher
Commissioned Fire Officer
Fire Investigator
Fire Protection Equipment Technician

Related Jobs or Working with these Jobs

 

Practical or MechanicalSkill Level 1Skill Level 2

 

Fire fighters control and put out fires to protect lives and property. They also provide rescue services at serious vehicle and industrial accidents, carry out fire hydrant inspections and  maintenance, and conduct inspections and risk assessments of private, industrial and commercial properties. Fire FutureGrowthModerate fighters also work closely with communities to raise awareness of fire safety and prevention strategies.

Fire fighters in Australia also conduct planned and controlled burns of
bush land area to minimise the the damage caused by uncontrolled fires
during the summer bushfire season.

ANZSCO description: Responds to fire alarms and emergency calls, controls and extinguishes fires, and protects life and property. Registration or licensing is required.

Specialisations: Aviation Fire Fighters, Fire Engineer (Army), Fire Prevention Officer

 

Fighting a Bushfire
Fighting a Bushfire
by CSIRO

Knowledge, skills and attributes

A fire fighter needs

  • a high level of physical fitness
  • the stamina to stay on their feet for a sustained period of time
  • ability to work as part of a team
  • ability to work at heights and in confined spaces
  • able to work in high pressure situations
  • to be willing to undertake ongoing training and professional development

Duties & Tasks

Firefighters may perform any of the following tasks:

  • drive, or be part of a crew involved with driving, firefighting vehicles or other vehicles to fires or emergency situations
  • respond to fire alarms and emergency calls
  • operate equipment such as pumps, extinguishers and foam or water hoses
  • operate equipment to neutralise dangerous chemicals
  • rescue people who are trapped in dangerous situations or places. This may require using ladders or elevating platforms. Also cutting equipment may be used to create openings in buildings and crashed vehicles to free occupants.
  • give first aid
  • operate radios and computer systems
  • participate in demonstrations and fire drills
  • visit buildings and identify potential fire hazards
  • inspect firefighting equipment and hydrants
  • train volunteer firefighters in evacuation procedures, fire prevention, firefighting, rescue and the use of breathing equipment

 

Working conditions

In order to maintain a 24-hour service every day of the year, fire fighters are required to work shift work, including nights, weekends and public holidays. Fires can happen at any time of night or day so firefighters are required to work rotating day and evening shifts.

Fire fighters often work at heights and in confined spaces, and of course in potentially hazardous situations.

Tools and technologies

Fire fighters use a range of specialised equipment, which can vary depending on the situation they are responding to. Protective equipment such as helmets, gloves, breathing apparatus and specially designed uniforms. Hydraulic rescue tools, such as the Jaws of Life, are often used to free victims from motor vehicle crashes, or other small spaces. They also use large hoses, ladders and small hand tools, axes and crowbars. They attend daily drills where they practise skills such as driving, handling equipment and operating ladders.

Education and training/entrance requirements

To become a fire fighter you must pass the Department of Fire and Emergency Services [DFES WA or equivalent in the other States or Territories] recruitment process and complete the Trainee Fire Fighter School training program.

Applicants must be an Australian citizen or a Permanent Resident, have a current Provide First Aid Certificate and hold an Unrestricted HR (Heavy Rigid) Class driver’s licence.

Applicants who meet these pre-requirements will be invited to commence the selection process, involving a series of written, physical, psychological and medical checks, as well as an interview.

Successful applicants are required to attend a training school for 17 weeks. This is followed by placement in fire stations.

Firefighter

 

Aviation Firefighter
Community and Health

Practical or Mechanical Skill Level 1Skill Level 2

Aviation firefighters fight fires in aircraft and buildings at airports, provide rescue and first aid services for aircraft passengers and crew, provide technical advice on fire safety and assist in FutureGrowthModerate educating airport users about firefighting and safety.

"Airservices aviation rescue fire fighters work in 26 fire stations at airports around Australia. Our fire fighters protect travellers and workers at Australia’s busiest airports and respond to a broad range of aviation and airport emergencies

Our Aviation Rescue Fire Fighting (ARFF) service is one of the world’s largest with more than 900 operational and support personnel based at airports around Australia. With Airservices, you will gain world recognised qualifications.

Fire fighting at Airservices offers a unique opportunity to stay fit, help people in a meaningful way and work in a dynamic outdoor team environment. To succeed in this rewarding career, you will require a high level of fitness, be committed to ongoing physical and technical training and be comfortable working outdoors.

To ensure that our fire fighters maintain the required levels of fitness and strength, every fire station has an on-site gym. If you are selected as one of our talented fire fighters, you will also have access to the expertise of qualified physical training instructors to support your training and there is time for individual physical training built into every shift." (Source: Air Services Australia)

Training Aviation Firefighters US
(Source: Wikipedia:
Training US Navy Aviation Firefighters)

Knowledge, skills and attributes

An aviation firefighter needs

  • a high level of physical fitness
  • able to swim
  • the stamina to stay on their feet for a sustained period of time
  • ability to work as part of a team
  • ability to work at heights and in confined spaces
  • able to work in high pressure situations
  • able to work in a structured service environment
  • good interpersonal and communication skills
  • to be willing to undertake ongoing training and professional development
  • Australian citizenship or permanent residency


Duties and Tasks

Aviation firefighters may perform the following tasks: Airservices

  • assist in the evacuation of people in life-threatening situations using mobile high-performance vehicles and watercraft

  • fight fires using a range of equipment, such as hoses, foam sprayers and monitors

  • administer first aid

  • protect property endangered by fires

  • protect the environment (as necessary) in an emergency situation

  • participate in organised drills for fire control and rescue work

  • conduct fire safety inspections and inspect fire alarm boards

  • test and maintain fire vehicles, hoses and other equipment

  • assist in the operation of the Fire Control Centre at airports

  • observe aircraft arrivals and departures

  • undertake revenue earning and special services as required.



Working conditions Fire Truck

The majority of aviation firefighters in Australia are employed by Airservices Australia in the Aviation Rescue and Fire Fighting Service (ARFF).

Shiftwork is compulsory. At many locations, the ARFF operates 24 hours per day; however, at smaller locations the service may be provided for fewer hours. The length of individual shifts varies between 10 and 16 hours, depending on the requirements of the location, and are organised around a rotating roster.

Tools and technologies

fight fires using a range of equipment, such as hoses, foam branches and monitors

Education and training/entrance requirements

To become an Aviation Firefighter you need to complete a Certificate II in Public Safety (Firefighting and Emergency Operations).

If you are successful in applying for an Aviation Rescue Fire Fighting Services (ARFFS) position with Airservices, you will be required to complete the PUA20613 Certificate II in Public Safety (Firefighting and Emergency Operations) before your placement at one of our ARFFS stations within Australia.

The training program is designed to provide you with the necessary skills and knowledge to commence your career as an aviation rescue fire fighter. Your training will cover: 

  • injury prevention
  •  responding to aviation incidents
  • working in a team
  • operating breathing apparatus
  • operating equipment and much more.

To be eligible to be an Airservices aviation rescue fire fighter applicants must meet the following minimum entry standards:  

  • be at least 18 years old
  • be an Australian or New Zealand Citizen or hold Australian Permanent Residency
  • pass the physical aptitude test
  • hold a current water competency qualification (e.g. bronze Medallion) or the ability to undertake and pass an ARFFS water competency assessment prior to commencement of the recruit course. (This requirement applies to stations with water rescue equipment)
  • hold or obtain the HLTAID003 Provide First Aid certificate or equivalent prior to commencement of the recruit course
  • hold a current manual drivers licence
  • pass all pre-employment checks. (Source: Air Services Australia)

 
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If you would like to know more about Aviation Firefighters, read Alex's story here:  Life on the Job

 

Did You Know?

Australian Firefighters help fight wildfires in California.


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Parliamentarian

Public Servant

Chiropractor

Medical Practitioner

Ophthalmologist

Audiologist

Podiatrist

Medical Imaging Technologist

  Speech Pathologist

Occupational Therapist

Natural Therapist

Community Corrections Officer

Prosthetist

SES Officer

Art Therapist

Dermatologist

Psychiatrist

Plastic or Reconstructive Surgeon

acupuncturist

Osteopath

Paediatrician

Prison Officer

Neurologist

Indigenous Community Worker

Oncologist

Vet

Firefighter

Garbage Collector

Midwife

Local Government Inspector

Paramedic

Postal Worker

Police

Teacher

Dentist