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Retail and Hospitality - FLORIST

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bullet.gif (981 bytes)Flower Decoration at Home

PrimaryPrimary MiddleMiddle

Personal and social capabilityAustralian Curriculum General Capability: Personal and social capability

 

 

1. Look at House and Garden on Pinterest

Australian House & Garden

2. Investigate how the designers and florists have worked to decorate these spaces.

3. Experiment at home with flowers from your garden - practice arranging them, colour coordination, size and height.

4. Take a photo and submit it to Pinterest or On the Job.

 

 

bullet.gif (981 bytes)Your Flower Business?

MiddleMiddle

Personal and social capabilityAustralian Curriculum General Capability: Personal and social capability

 

1. In pairs, you are to visit your local florist. You are to interview the florist about their business.

Before your visit, you need to gain permission from the school and the florist.

Write up a list of questions you might ask the florist and send these to the florist beforehand eg. What is the best selling flower? What days or events are the best for your business? What is your online business like? Do you have an online business? Why? Why not?

2. Visit your florist and take photos.

Find out why they became a florist.

What are the good points of this job? Not so good points?

3. Make a leaflet explaining this business, why it is good, does the business make "good" money, all the flowers they offer, plus hints for keeping your flowers alive.

4. Reflection

Reflection.

Would you like to become a florist? Why? Why not? Write up your reasons.

5. A thriving flower business - Sai Garlands.

Look at the following video from Gardening Australia where Soori and Gana run a small business creating gorgeous flower garlands for weddings and celebrations, catering to diverse communities around Sydney.

Gardening Australia

Transcript: "Soori learned to make the garlands in Sri Lanka. “I learned myself, 16 years old. So these are the traditional garland style made from carnations, typically white and red. As you can see, it's quite vibrant.” Soori started volunteering at her local temple, making garlands over 25 years ago. Slowly but surely, word of mouth got around about Soori's garlands and eventually it turned into a business.

Soori’s daughter Gana is a biomedical engineer who is also taking on the family business. “As a child, our house used to always have flowers and never did I stop and go, "Oh, that's pretty." Like, I was like, "Cool, flowers," keep walking. But then I got married and during my wedding ceremony we started looking at the flowers together and that's when I started going, "Oh, this is actually really fun. "I'm actually really enjoying this."

Soori feels a connection to her Sri Lankan home through making the garlands. Culturally they are very important, used “for funerals, used at temples, used at weddings, even baby showers… So, it's like an offering that you give to God. You know, a lot of, like, the stories to do with Hinduism, one bride picks her husband from a series of guys by putting the garland on him. It's amazing how many different cultures use flowers in the same way.”

Wedding garlands are often less traditional than those used in temples. Gana says, “for the South Indian or Tamil Sri Lankan wedding, there's actually two outfits the bride wears, so you come in with one sari and then the groom's side presents you with another sari and you've got about five minutes to go get changed and come back. Yeah, you change everything. Some people even change their jewellery, their hair. And there's four sets of garlands. Some girls go all out, so... Yeah. Weddings are massive in our culture.”

The flowers for the garlands are sourced from the Sydney Flower Markets, including chrysanthemums, roses, and baby’s breath, all in the traditional colours of red, white, and yellow.

Chrysanthemum
Red Chrysanthemum - photo by Tom Quartermaine
(Source: Fine Art America)
Baby's Breath
Baby's Breath
(Source: The Little Market Bunch)
Yellow Roses
Yellow Roses
(Source: Bouqs)

To make a simple garland, first they take a quick measurement from neck to where you want it to end, to get the right size string, leaving leave a bit of slack to tie the knot at the end. Usually it’s “about 60 to 70 centimetres that we do for most people, and it fits really well.”

Starting with one side, a needle is threaded with the string. The flowers are pinched off the stem right to the base of the flower, and then the needle poked through the centre threading it onto the string. The flowers should be facing up towards the person wearing it. Each flower is carefully threaded on “as close as possible but not squishing them.”

The larger, more open flowers are best to use especially when “competing against a rose, you kind of need that size to see the colour and the bloom.” For this garland pattern, they alternate between 6 white chrysanthemum, 1 red rose, and another 6 yellow chrysanthemums. Then it’s time to move onto the other side, which should be symmetrical, before tying the two together. “Traditionally, there's a section that comes off the bottom as well” such as a few more flowers dangling downwards.

Gana says, “I'm glad I'm taking on the garlands because I know growing up with it in the house how it influenced me even without me knowing. And I hope it has the same effect when I have kids and when I have my baby” which will be very soon!" (Source: Gardening Australia)

Soori and Gana's business is called Sai Garlands. Go and have a look at their Facebook page.

 

This business is unique as it caters to a specific market. What ideas do you see for a florist business that is unique?

 

 


Online

bullet.gif (981 bytes)Cut Flowers and Valentine's Day: What do you know!

MiddleMiddle High SchoolSecondary

NumeracyAustralian Curriculum General Capability: Numeracy

Intercultural UnderstandingAustralian Curriculum General Capability: Intercultural Understanding

Australian Curriculum Cross Curriculum Priorities: Sustainability Priority

 

1. In pairs, read the following article in The Conversation 9 February 2018 Reading

The Conversation

2. Jot down all the facts and figures. Were you surprised by any of these figures?

3. Compare your facts and figures with another pair. Did you get the same results? Why? Why not? Discuss as a group your findings.

4. Visit your local florist. Ask about the sales for Valentine's Day. Compare and contrast from the article. Take photos of this shop.

5. Using the information from the article and your industry visit, compile an infographic. Submit this infographic to your teacher.

6. Reflection

Reflection.

Write up ways you can sustainably celebrate Valentine's Day.

 

 

DID YOU KNOW?

The nursery rhyme Ring Around the Rosey is often considered a rhyme about the plague. Infected people with the plague would get red circular sores (Ring around the rosey...), these sores would smell very badly so common folk would put flowers on their bodies somewhere inconspicuously), so that it would cover the smell of the sores (....pocket full of poseys..), People who died from the plague would be burned so as to reduce the possible spread of the disease (...ashes, ashes we all fall down!) (see more about this here).

Flowers on coffin

 

 

bullet.gif (981 bytes)Websites, Games & Apps
 

bullet.gif (981 bytes)Flower Memory Game 

PrimaryPrimary

ICT Capability
Australian Curriculum General Capability: ICT Capability




Fun Match
This is a simple memory game with four different
levels which determine the size of the game.
bullet.gif (981 bytes) Flower Games

PrimaryPrimary

ICT Capability
Australian Curriculum General Capability: ICT Capability


Flower Games
bullet.gif (981 bytes)Plant and Flower Games

PrimaryPrimary

ICT Capability
Australian Curriculum General Capability: ICT Capability


Plant and Flower Games
bullet.gif (981 bytes)The Florist Game

PrimaryPrimary

ICT Capability
Australian Curriculum General Capability: ICT Capability


The Florist Game


WebQuests

bullet.gif (981 bytes)Seed Power

PrimaryPrimary

ICT Capability Australian Curriculum General Capability: ICT Capability

Florist - Seed Power WebQuest


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