Fun Activities

On The Job

Government & Defence - PRISON OFFICER

Online

Prisons on Film: Australian Stories

High SchoolSecondary

CriticalAustralian Curriculum General Capability: Critical and creative thinking
Personal and social capability
Australian Curriculum General Capability:
Personal and social capability

IndigenousAustralian Curriculum Cross Curriculum Priorities: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories and cultures

 

1. Australian Screen provides Australia’s audiovisual heritage online. Paul Byrnes, a Curator at Australian Screen, has put together an article on Prisons on Film - from Ned Kelly through to an Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander film Here I am (2011).

ASO

 

In groups of five, use the Expert Jigsaw Strategy to form expert groups for the five sections of the article from Australian Screen:  Reading

  • Jailbirds and bushrangers

  • Convicts

  • Prison helps no-one

  • Prison comedy

  • Indigenous stories

2. You are each to

  • List the films stated in chronological order

  • State the premise of the story

3. Choose one film to investigate - eg. look at the clip if provided or look at YouTube videos from the film. Video

 Byrnes' ideas about prisons can be found in the following quotes:

The film contains many of the universal themes of the prison movie: the de-humanisation and violence between prisoner and prison officer, the tensions and loyalties between prisoners, the influence of politics and the ultimate strength of state repression. Almost no prison movie made anywhere in the world depicts a prison as a place where reform and rehabilitation are possible. Australian prison movies are no different.


The most overrepresented groups in Australian prisons, in comparison to population, are people of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander descent.


Incarceration has many colours and ages in Australia. As the 19th century became the 20th, children were locked up in prison ships on Sydney harbour, and in juvenile homes for girls. At the start of the 21st century, children are locked up in immigration detention centres, an ongoing shame to many Australians.

There is an old quote, often attributed to Dostoevsky, that a country’s civilisation can be measured by the way it treats its prisoners. The movies we make tell us a lot about our own attitudes to that question."


Which quote do you think represents the film you investigated?

4. Share with your group what you have learnt about the film you have investigated. 

Optional Extra

5. Look at the Prison Songs 2015 Documentary

 

Prison Songs

 

Does this documentary display any difference to the other films you have looked at previously?

What facts surprised you?

 

Discussion

Discuss with your group.

 

 

Cooma Prison: A creative response

 High SchoolSecondary

CriticalAustralian Curriculum General Capability: Critical and creative thinking
Personal and social capability
Australian Curriculum General Capability:
Personal and social capability

LiteracyAustralian Curriculum General Capability: Literacy

 

 1. Read the following article about the Cooma Jail [ABC News 2017]: Reading

 

ABC News

2. Write down all the facts from this article using the Retrieval Chart Strategy

3. Compare your findings with a group of 4 - 5 students.

4. Read the following poem from Henry Lawson [click here to learn more about the Poet Henry Lawson]: The Song of a Prison from the Australian Poetry Library. Reading

Australian Poetry Library

 

5. With reference to Henry Lawson's poem, you are to write a 5 stanza poem or quintet about the Cooma Prison. You can write it from either a prisoner or a prison officer's view.

 

 

 

side 5

side bar

side bar

sidebar 9

Jeweller side

side 5

side bar

side bar

sidebar 9

Jeweller side

side 5