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Create your own obstacle course

PrimaryPrimary MiddleMiddle  High SchoolSecondary

Critical & Creative ThinkingAustralian Curriculum General Capability: Critical & Creative Thinking

NumeracyAustralian Curriculum General Capability: Numeracy

 

1. To give you some ideas, look at the following photo of a real military obstacle course and some ideas from other courses:

Obstacle Course

Tyre Course
(Source: Ideas for kids parties)
Wall Climbing
(Source: Ideas for kids parties)

Do you have a wall at school to climb?
Monkey bars
(Source: Ideas for kids parties)
Sack Race
(Source: MomJunction)


Teams
(Source: Event Solutions)

2. As a class, reach consensus about the type and number of obstacles you want in your obstacle race. Use boxes, nets, cones and other objects to provide obstacles for students to jump, crawl, run through and climb over.

3. Construct a simple obstacle course in your school yard that only your class has access to. All students have at least three goes and the teacher is to time each student. Have one student record the PBs.

4. It would be an idea to film the event to be shown later to the whole class.

TeacherTeacher

Check with your teacher to make sure that your obstacle course is safe for use.

Time each run of the course and provide a prize for the winner. (Source: eHow)

See if students can improve on their PBs (Personal Best).

 

 

Tactical Operations

PrimaryPrimary MiddleMiddle  High SchoolSecondary

Critical & Creative ThinkingAustralian Curriculum General Capability: Critical & Creative Thinking

1. Divide into teams.

2. Fill 12 balloons with water and scatter across the allocated area to act as mines.

3. Blindfold one soldier from each team at a time and have him/her try to cross the makeshift minefield without standing on a mine.

 As the Army Officer, you are to direct the other players to give their teammates directions to help them across. The team to get the most players across safely wins.  (Source: eHow)

 

 

War Debate

PrimaryPrimary MiddleMiddle  High SchoolSecondary

Critical & Creative ThinkingAustralian Curriculum General Capability: Critical & Creative Thinking

Intercultural UnderstandingAustralian Curriculum General Capability: Intercultural Understanding

Personal and social capabilityAustralian Curriculum General Capability: Personal and social capability
Literacy
Australian Curriculum General Capability: Literacy

Ethical Understanding Australian Curriculum General Capability: Ethical Understanding

Conflicts in 2008

1. Read the following article:  Reading

Why Wars Happen

There have been nine wars and almost 130 violent conflicts across the world this year [2008], according to an annual report released on Monday December 15th by the Heidelberg Institute for International Conflict Research, a think-tank. The study classifies conflict broadly to include peaceful disputes over politics or borders (low intensity), as well as those involving sporadic or constant violence (medium or high intensity). In 2008 previously non-violent conflicts escalated into violence in countries such as Kenya and Yemen. Ideological change is both the most common cause of conflict and the root of most wars, but there is rarely only one cause of dispute. Congo's ongoing conflict encompasses a battle for its mineral resources and, according to some, an invasion by another state, Rwanda. (Source: The Economist)

2. What do you think the cause of war is?

3. Survey the class. What was the response most common to the class? Survey neighbouring classes. Were their responses similar?

4. Individually, create an argumentative speech, highlighting why yours is the most correct answer. You may wish to choose one you do not agree with and argue for it to show why it is not a valid answer.

5. Was there one common argument? Why do you think this is? How did you reach consensus?

 

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