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Mathematics and Horse Trainers

NumeracyAustralian Curriculum General Capability: Numeracy

MiddleMiddle High SchoolSecondary

 

1. Read the following article from The Conversation: Horses for courses: the science behind Melbourne Cup winners by David Evans, Adjunct Associate Professor in Equine Exercise Science at Charles Sturt University Reading

The Conversation 31102014

2. "During the race [The Melbourne Cup], each horse’s heart rate will hit 220-230 beats per minute, with each beat pumping around 1.3-1.4 litres of blood (this is called stroke volume). To put this in perspective, around 300 litres of blood will be pumped to each horse’s muscles and other tissues during each minute of the Melbourne Cup race.

That blood also has an extraordinarily high concentration of haemoglobin – its oxygen-carrying component – much higher than that of elite human athletes.

These factors combine to enable an elite racehorse to consume approximately 250 litres of oxygen during the race.

On average, horses in the Cup will consume oxygen at maximum rates of around 180ml per minute for each kilogram of body weight after the first minute of the race."
(Source: The Conversation)

3. Bart Cummings (J.B.Cummings)
was a famous Australian Horse Trainer - here are his results for the Melbourne Cup:

Year Horse Jockey Trainer Colours Sex Age Wgt Time
2008 Viewed B. Shinn J.B. Cummings Bay Horse 5 53 3.20.40
1999 Rogan Josh J. Marshall J.B. Cummings Brown Gelding 7 50 3.19.64
1996 Saintly D. Beadman J.B. Cummings Chesnut Gelding 4 55.5 3.18.80
1991 Lets Elope S.R. King J.B. Cummings Chesnut Mare 4 51 3.18.90
1990 Kingston Rule D. Beadman J.B. Cummings Chesnut Horse 5 53 3.16.30
1979 Hyperno H. White J.B. Cummings Bay/Brown Gelding 6 56 3.21.80
1977 Gold And Black J. Duggan J.B. Cummings Brown Gelding 5 57 3.18.40
1975 Think Big H. White J.B. Cummings Bay Gelding 5 58.5 3.29.60
1974 Think Big H. White J.B. Cummings Bay Gelding 4 53 3.23.10
1967 Red Handed R. Higgins J.B. Cummings Chesnut Gelding 5 55 3.20.40
1966 Galilee J. Miller J.B. Cummings Bay Gelding 4 56.5 3.21.90
1965 Light Fingers R. Higgins J.B. Cummings Chesnut Mare 4 52.5 3.21.10

 

4. Calculate for each of Bart Cummings' winners:

a. The oxygen consumed based on 180mls per minute for each kilogram of body weight.

b. The average time for Bart Cummings' winners

c. The best time to weight [handicap] ratio

d. The difference between the fastest and slowest times

e. If you were to predict Bart Cummings [before he died] next winning horse what would it's weight handicap, age and sex be?

 

Let's start a syndicate!

PrimaryPrimary MiddleMiddle 

NumeracyAustralian Curriculum General Capability: Numeracy

LiteracyAustralian Curriculum General Capability: Literacy

1. Read the following information with a partner. Reading

"Once upon a time it used to be an exclusive club that got to race a horse and get their name in the race book on race day, but now just a 5% share will see your name up in lights as an owner, well in the race book anyway, with up to 20 owners being allowed.

So how do you get involved in Racehorse Syndication?

First you need a horse. Horse racing shares can be as little as $1000 or less for a 10% share or as much as $10,000 or more, depending on the breeding of the horse in question.

A very well bred horse might fetch upwards of $5000-$10,000 a share while bargain buys may be around $1,000-$5000 a share.

Once you decide on an amount that you are willing to spend, then you can work out what to do next.

If you can afford a 5% or 10% share then you can use the following guide to associated ongoing costs.

How much does Racehorse Syndication cost?

For our guide we will use a 10% share as an example.

The yearly cost to train, race & maintain a racehorse is around $30,000 to $35,000, therefore a 10% share equates to around $3000-$3500 each year on average.

Weekly costs would set you back approximately $60-$70 per week for a 10% share, with a 5% share in the $30-$35 per week range.

5% Share - around $30-$35 per week ($1500-$1750 per year)
10% Share - around $60-$70 per week ($3000-$3500 per year)
15% Share - around $90-$105 per week ($4500-$5250 per year)
20% Share - around $120-$140 per week ($6000-$7000 per year)

Of course, if a 5% or 10% share and ongoing costs are out of your price range, then racehorse syndication is the perfect way to become a racehorse owner, because they make owning a racehorse very affordable!

How do I set up a Racehorse Syndicate?

The cost to set up a horse racing syndicate is $275 and you can use any name that is not registered, or is not offending in any way.

Let's say you and 4 friends want to get together to buy a racehorse and have all agreed on a 10% share in a lovely Fastnet Rock filly that has a $5,000 asking price for a 10% share.

Each of you would own a 2% share in the horse and be responsible for purchase & ongoing costs.
"
(Source: Progroupracing)

 

2. Questions:

  • What are your initial costs?
  • The fees for training, racing and maintaining the horsefor the month are ...?
  • If the horse wins a regional race, say at Scone Race Club, and collects $22K, how much will you get in your syndicate? You personally?
  • Your outfit for each race is averaged out at $125. You get a new outfit every third race. How much have you spent over the year on outfits? Are you still ahead with the cost of your racehorse?
  • The race entrance fee for your horse for each race is $1500. Are you still ahead after winning in your syndicate?
  • How many times will your horse have to win to give you the monies you would like to have? Remember, a horse can only race from September to April and only every two weeks.

3. Would you like to own a racehorse? Describe in one paragraph what that would be like for you. Share with your partner.

 

Racehorses & the Knackery

High SchoolSecondary

CriticalAustralian Curriculum General Capability: Critical and creative thinking

Ethical Understanding Australian Curriculum General Capability: Ethical Understanding

PhilosophyPhilosophy

 

1. In groups of 3 - 4 students, you are to read the following article from The Conversation 25 October 2019 Reading

The Conversation

2. As you are reading this article, note down dot points about the arguments given.

3. You are going to conduct a Community of Inquiry [CoI] with this article as your stimulus material.

4. The first thing in a CoI is to create questions about the topic and article using the following Question Quadrant

Philosophy Question Quadrant

Pair up within your group and come up with 1 question for each quadrant. As a group, explore 2 more Questions for Thinking.

5. Conduct your Community of Inquiry by discussing the most raised Thinking Question (s).

 

 

Websites, Games & Apps

Horse Rancher

PrimaryPrimary

ICTAustralian Curriculum General Capability: Information and Communication Technology Capability

Game

Derby Quest Horse Racing Game (iPhone App)

PrimaryPrimary MiddleMiddle


ICTAustralian Curriculum General Capability: Information and Communication Technology Capability

Derby Quest Horse Racing Game

Cost: Free

Screenshots

 WebQuests

Mustangs Run Free WebQuest

StarStarStarPrimary IconPrimary

ICTAustralian Curriculum General Capability: Information and Communication Technology Capability

LiteracyAustralian Curriculum General Capability: Literacy

Mustangs Run Free WebQuest

 

 

Syndicate Costs - Answer

1. Doing the maths, each of you would be up for an initial $1000 each for the share and $55 each to set up your horse racing syndicate.

2. Your weekly costs would be in the vicinity of $15 a week each (app $60 per month) for a 2% share.

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