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Environments - CIVIL ENGINEER


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What do you know: Fungi can help concrete heal its own cracks!

MiddleMiddle  High SchoolSecondary

LiteracyAustralian Curriculum General Capability: Literacy

Australian Curriculum Cross Curriculum Priorities: Sustainability Priority

1. In groups of 4 - 5 students, read the following article from The Conversation 20 January 2018 Reading

The Conversation

2. Re-read the article but this time use the Retrieval Chart Strategy to list as many important facts and statements as possible.

3. What do you think would be the next steps to bring this discovery to fruition in Australia? In your neighbourhood?

 

 

The Sydney Harbour Bridge: An investigation

MiddleMiddle  High SchoolSecondary

CriticalAustralian Curriculum General Capability: Critical and creative thinking

LiteracyAustralian Curriculum General Capability: Literacy

Australian Curriculum Cross Curriculum Priorities: Sustainability Priority

 

 

1. One of Australia's iconic structures is the Sydney Harbour Bridge. Read the following details about the bridge:  Reading

Did You Know?

The Sydney Harbour Bridge is one of Sydney's two most famous landmarks, the other being the Opera House.

Completed in 1932, the construction of the bridge - known locally as "The coathanger" - was an economic feat as well as an engineering triumph. Prior to the bridge being built, the only links between the city centre in the south and the residential north were by ferry or by a 20 kilometre (12½ mile) road route that involved five bridge crossings.

The Sydney Harbour Bridge, which is known locally as the "Coat Hanger", took eight years to build, including the railway line. The bridge was manufactured in sections on a site that is now occupied by Luna Park fun fair.

Construction on the bridge began in December, 1926. The foundations, which are 12 metres (39 feet) deep, are set in sandstone. Anchoring tunnels are 36 metres (118 feet) long and dug into rock at each end. Construction on the arch began in November, 1929. It was built in halves with steel cable restraints initially supporting each side. The arch spans 503 metres (1650 feet) and supports the weight of the bridge deck, with hinges at either end bearing the bridge's full weight and spreading the load to the foundations. The hinges allow the structure to move as the steel expands and contracts in response to wind and changes in temperatures.

By October, 1930, the two arch halves had met and work then began on the deck. The deck is 59 metres (194 feet) above sea level and was built from the centre out.

The Harbour Bridge was officially opened on 19 March 1932. The total cost of the Bridge was approximately 6.25 million Australian pounds ($A13.5 million), and was eventually paid off in 1988. The initial toll for a car was 6 pence (5 cents) and a horse and rider was 3 pence (2 cents). Today the toll costs $3.00. The toll is now used for bridge maintenance and to pay for the Sydney Harbour Tunnel. The annual maintenance costs are approximately $5 million. More than 150,000 vehicles cross the bridge each day.

The bridge was built by 1400 workers, 16 of whom were killed in accidents during construction. Painting the bridge has become an endless task. Approximately 80,000 litres (21,000 gallons) of paint are required for each coat, enough to cover an area equivalent to 60 soccer fields.

(Source: Sydney.com.au)

For a more detailed Engineering Materials (HSC standard) from the NSW Department of Education, go to

NSW Dept of Ed

2. In pairs, read the following two articles Reading

The Conversation 16 August 2018

The Conversation
The Conversation 22 August 2018

The Conversation

3. Discussion

Discuss and create a two minute presentation about the Sydney Harbour Bridge, its importance to Sydney, its maintenance and upkeep.

4. OR create an infographic about

i. Sydney Harbour Bridge, its importance to Sydney, its maintenance and upkeep.
ii. Bridges in general and the role of the Civil Engineer

 

 

Websites, Games & Apps

Building Games Online

PrimaryPrimary MiddleMiddle

ICT Capability Australian Curriculum General Capability: ICT Capability

Building Games
Engineering.com: Building Bridge Game

MiddleMiddle  High SchoolSecondary

ICT Capability Australian Curriculum General Capability: ICT Capability


Building Bridge
Extreme Engineering: Games


MiddleMiddle  High SchoolSecondary

ICT Capability Australian Curriculum General Capability: ICT Capability


Extreme Engineering games
Play Games

MiddleMiddle  High SchoolSecondary

ICT Capability Australian Curriculum General Capability: ICT Capability

Numeracy
Australian Curriculum General Capability: Numeracy


Play Engineering Games
Design a Mars Parachute


MiddleMiddle  High SchoolSecondary

ICT Capability Australian Curriculum General Capability: ICT Capability


Design a Mars Parachute
Beat the Heat

MiddleMiddle  High SchoolSecondary

ICT Capability Australian Curriculum General Capability: ICT Capability

Numeracy
Australian Curriculum General Capability: Numeracy


Beat the Heat
PowerUp

MiddleMiddle  High SchoolSecondary

ICT Capability Australian Curriculum General Capability: ICT Capability

Numeracy
Australian Curriculum General Capability: Numeracy


PowerUp

Enquiring Minds - Bridges to Higher Education Project

Bridges to Higher Education - Building

PrimaryPrimary

Numeracy
Australian Curriculum General Capability: Numeracy


Enquiring Minds

WebQuests

Cracking Dams

High SchoolSecondary

Numeracy
Australian Curriculum General Capability: Numeracy


Cracking Dams WebQuest



A Bridge over Water

High SchoolSecondary

Numeracy
Australian Curriculum General Capability: Numeracy



A Bridge Over Water WebQuest


 
Did You Know?

Temperature measurement and the Stevenson screen

To measure the temperature of the air accurately, it is important that the thermometer is shielded from direct
sunlight but is still exposed to a good airflow. The standard screen used internationally to shelter instruments is a double-louvred wooden box, with the instruments 1.2 to 2.0 metres above ground level. This screen, known as 'a Stevenson screen', was designed by Thomas Stevenson (1818-1887), a British civil engineer and father of Robert Louis Stevenson. The use of a standard screen allows temperatures to be compared accurately with those measured in earlier years and at different places.

The Stevenson screen was first introduced to Australia in the 1880s and was installed everywhere, with a few
exceptions, by 1910. Prior to this date, thermometers were located in various types of shelter, as well as under verandas and even in unheated rooms indoors. Because of this lack of standardisation, many pre-1910 temperatures in Australia are not strictly comparable with those measured after that date, and therefore must be used with care in analyses of climate change within Australia
.(Source: ABS)

Stevenson Screen
(Source: BOM - Stevenson Screen)


 

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